Title: Buffalo Bill's Wild West Route Diary

Date: 1896

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SOUVENIR
BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST
1896

 

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COL. W. F. CODY. "BUFFALO BILL."

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OFFICIAL SOUVENIR
BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST
And Congress of Rough Riders of the World.

1896

CONTAINING INTERESTING EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS,
VALUABLE DATA, ETC. FOR THE SEASON OF 1896.

Edited by M. B. BAILEY.

Compiled and Published by CHAS. R. HUTCHINSON.

 

THE COURIER COMPANY
DESIGNERS
ENGRAVERS
PRINTERS
BUFFALO, N.Y.

 

PREFACE

IT is usually customary in presenting a book of this kind to friends and the public to offer an apology, but the authors of this book have no apology to make, as neither one of us are authors or poets, but simply employees of the BUFFALO BILL WILD WEST COMPANY; and in an honest endeavor to earn our salaries and write a book at the same time is hard enough without going through the humiliation of offering an apology for our work, when we did the best we could under existing circumstances.

We have tried to avoid the lionizing of one class of people or overlooking others, but to give a correct account of things as they occurred. There may have been some mistakes made, and some things overlooked; for this we simply ask forbearance—nothing more.

Our principal object has been to have a book as near correct as possible, and one that would receive the approval of our fellow-workmen during the Season of 1896.

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Courier Co.

THE WAY THEY COME.

 

STAFF OF CODY AND SALSBURY.

COL. W. F. CODY, PRESIDENT.
NATE SALSBURY, VICE-PRESIDENT AND MANAGER.
MAJOR JOHN M. BURKE, General Manager.
JULE KEEN, Treasurer.
W. O. SNYDER, Representative of Col. Cody.
DEXTER W. FELLOWS, Press Agent.
MORRIS KERN, Accountant.
WILLIAM SWEENY, Leader of Band.
WILLIAM McCUNE, Chief Usher.
M.B. BAILEY, Superintendent Electric Lights.
J. J. McCARTHY, Orator.
G. W. BURCH, Chief of Cowboys.
JOHN BAKER, Superintendent Ammunition.
LEW McKOWN, Superintendent Bronco Tent.
CLYDE W. CLARY, Sergeant United States Cavalry.
W. THOMS, Sergeant 5th Royal Irish Lancers.
PAUL FAVRET, Sergeant French Dragoons.
CAPT. JULIUS VON NATZMER, Captain Cuirassiers.
SHEIK HADJ TAHAR, Chief of Arabs.
LOUCAS TCHKARTISKIVLY, Chief of Cossacks.
VICENTE ORAPEZA, Chief of Mexicans.
 

STAFF OF J. A. BAILEY

J. A. BAILEY, DIRECTOR OF TOUR.
J. T. McCADDON, Manager.
JAMES ANDERSON, General Superintendent.
CHARLES R. HUTCHINSON, Treasurer.
FRED. B. HUTCHINSON, Accountant.
JOSEPH P. QUAID, Assistant Treasurer.
ED. M. SHOWLES, Assistant Treasurer.
E. N. AIKEN, Secretary.
JAKE PLATT, Superintendent of Canvas.
JOHN H. MURRAY, Chief Usher.
JOHN McLAUGHLIN, Superintendent of Train.
WILLIAM WELTON, Superintendent of Stock.
DAN TAYLOR, Superintendent of Mechanics.
WILLIAM BAKER, Superintendent of Cars.
JACK STACKS, Superintendent of Wardrobe.
ED. McLAUGHLIN, Assistant Superintendent of Stock.
ED. LACEY, First Assistant Superintendent of Canvas.
JOHN EBERLEE, Second Assistant Superintendent of Canvas.
THOMAS McAVOY, Third Assistant Superintendent of Canvas.
H. VANBUREN, Fourth Assistant Superintendent of Canvas.
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JAMES A. BAILEY.

 

Advertising Department.

W. H. GARDNER, General Agent.

Major John M. Burke, Representing Cody & Salsbury in the Advance.
M. Coyle, Railroad and Excursion Agent.
Whiting Allen, General Press Agent.
S. H. Semon, Contracting Agent.

Car No. 1.

H. H. GUNNING, Car Manager.

J. E. Allien, Agent Special Programme.
Thomas Brown, Boss Bill-poster.
M. G. Fisher, Assistant Boss Bill-poster.
Frank C. Archer, Stenographer and Litho.
Arthur Windish, Lithographer.

BILL POSTERS.

Car No. 2.

GEORGE W. GOODHEART, Car Manager.

Mike Manton, Lithograph Boards.
George Neff, Lithographer.
Charles Knox, Boss Bill-poster.
E. H. Woods, Press and Mailing Agent

BILL POSTERS.

Car No. 3.

FRED. BECKMAN, Manager.

W. T. Morgan, Boss Bill-poster.
Tom Conners, Assistant Boss Bill-poster.
U. G. Herrman, Lithographer.
James E. King, Assistant Lithos.
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Courier Co.

UNITED STATES CAVALRY.

 

BILL POSTERS.

Special Agent.

BURT J. CONN.

Checker-Up.

FRED LE CRONE.

Layers-Out.

United States Cavalry.

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UNITED STATES CAVALRY

CLYDE W. CLARY, Sergeant.

PAUL H. WEINERT, Standard Bearer.

  • Newton H. Mangus,
  • Fred. Niedrest,
  • Arthur McCann,
  • Frank W. Chamberlain,
  • Cornelius Shea,
  • Harry Coyner,
  • Oscar Fuggle,
  • John T. Flint,
  • Mahew Elliott,
  • Harry B. Coulter,
  • Shelia Jenkins,
  • William Goodwin,
  • Bert Antes,
  • Richard Watson,
  • George Buyer,
  • William Baker.
  • Dennis Dangan,
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Courier Co.

GERMAN CUIRASSIERS.

 

American Cowboys.

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COWBOY

  • G. W. BURCH, Chief.
  • WILLIAM BRACE, Assistant.
  • John Franz,
  • Kid Gabel,
  • G. Hudson Piller,
  • Joseph Esquevel,
  • Phil. Smith,
  • Ed. Goodrich,
  • Pedro Esquevel,
  • Joe Campbell,
  • Abe Laduke,
  • Geo. Johnson,
  • Bob Wilkinson,
  • Ben Galindo,
  • Walter Scott,
  • Ed. Hughes,
  • John Burke,
  • Bert Schenck,
  • John Venoy,
  • Charles Higley.
  • William Gabel,
  • Si Compton,

German Cuirassiers.

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German Cavalry

  • JULIUS VON NATZMER, Captain.
  • ALBERT BUSCH, Standard Bearer.
  • Emil Wittmann,
  • Gustav Freyer,
  • Gustav Rosenberg,
  • Mathaeus Kinzel,
  • Theodor Gigeling,
  • Heinrich Spritulle,
  • Otto Leithaus,
  • Herman Ludwig,
  • Albert Zieplis,
  • Karl Stenzel,
  • Alfred Weber,
  • Herman Monthey.
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Courier Co.

ROYAL IRISH LANCERS.

 

French Dragoons.

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FRENCH CAVALRY.

  • PAUL FAVRET, Sergeant.
  • LOUIS RANIER, Standard Bearer.
  • Auguste Biree,
  • Charles Sene,
  • Albert Panard,
  • Desire Wiard,
  • Ernest Hubal,
  • Alfred Frabut,
  • Marcel Longchamps,
  • Lucien Deschamps,
  • Arme Humbert,
  • Herman Manthaf.
  • George Karcher,

5th Royal Irish Lancers.

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ROYAL IRISH LANCERS

  • W. THOMS, Sergeant.
  • H. BURROWS, Standard Bearer.
  • H. Winfield,
  • E. Davis,
  • J. Ryan,
  • J. Byrnes,
  • P. Danskin,
  • J. Frost,
  • J. Clarke,
  • E. Lodge,
  • W. Agland,
  • W. Corin,
  • J. Williams,
  • F. Marsden.
 

Cossacks.

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RUSSIAN COSSACK

  • THOMAS OLIVER, Interpreter.
  • LOUCAS TCHKARTISHVILY, Chief.
  • Konstantin Tchkartishvily,
  • Dgimshet Lomadze,
  • Nestor Khoukhounaishvily,
  • Loucas Ebralidze,
  • Alexzander Tskuitishvily,
  • Dimitry Tsintsadze.
  • Alexzander Mourouanidze,

Arabs.

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ARAB

  • SHIEK HADJ TAHAR.
  • F. Hadie,
  • Abdallah Ali,
  • Ambark Ali,
  • Hadj Sherriff (Dervish)
  • Said Ali,
  • Neif Sadie,
  • Slymen Ben Damood,
  • Salam Hadj Ali,
  • Saleem Nassar,
  • Asad Shwairy,
  • Baskar Hadj Ali,
  • Nafim Abdallah.
  • M. Muzie,
 

Mexicans.

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MEXICAN

  • VICENTE ORAPEZA, Chief.
  • Diomicio Ramos,
  • Bernardo Ramos,
  • Cruz F. Almendarez,
  • Trinidad Ramos,
  • Rito Aguillon,
  • Simon Malacara,
  • Manuael Pena,
  • Mariano Rocha.

Gauchos.

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GAUCHO S.A.

  • PEDRO ESQUEVEL, Chief.
  • Joseph Esquevel.
  • Ben Galindo.
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Courier Co.

RUSSIAN COSSACKS.

 

Indians.

Chiefs.

  • Rocky Bear,
  • Bear Foot
  • Black Fox,
  • Lone Bear,
  • Kills in Winter,
  • Poor Elk.
  • Flat Iron, Medicine Man.
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INDIAN CHIEF

Braves.

  • Brown Ears Horse,
  • Brave,
  • Bushy-Top Pine,
  • Bone,
  • Charging in Winter,
  • Bluffing Bear,
  • Comes Back,
  • Comes Last,
  • Eagle Bull,
  • Feather in his Head,
  • Full Stomach,
  • Flying Horse,
  • Good Elk,
  • Good Soldier,
  • High Wolf,
  • High Eagle,
  • High Bear,
  • Hawk Wing,
  • Kills Small,
  • Kills without Fear,
  • Kills Across,
  • Little Soldier,
  • Long Bull,
  • Lone Elk,
  • Loud-Voiced Hawk,
  • Looks and Kills,
  • Little Bull,
  • No Braid,
  • Plucks the Porcupine,
  • Pines,
  • Red Bull,
  • Red Feather,
  • Red Elk,
  • Red Star,
  • Strikes Three Times,
  • Sitting Holy,
  • Stabber,
  • Sounding Sides,
  • Shot in Pieces,
  • Tales,
  • Two Bulls,
  • Twins,
  • Two Bonnets,
  • Two Dogs,
  • White Bull,
  • White Wolf,
  • Yellow Horse,
  • Young Wolf Ears.

Squaws.

  • Red Dog Woman,
  • Looks Back,
  • Walks at Night,
  • Sallie Red Star.
  • Stella Fast Under.

Papoose.

Little Bear Ring.

Watchman Indian Camp.

Patsey Flinn.

All under the supervision of ALEX. MERRIVAL, Interpreter. He is the only Indian that ever wore a wooden leg that was made in New York City. It was manufactured by C. A. Frees & Co.

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Courier Co.

INDIAN CHIEFS.

 

Cody and Salsbury Mechanical Department.

LEW McKOWN, In Charge.

W. Wells, Harness Maker.
F. W. King, Blacksmith.
R. G. Grant, Helper.

Chandeliers.

JESS DELLING, In Charge.

Charles Wagner, Assistant.

Performers.

Miss Annie Oakley (Mrs. Butler), Little Sure Shot.
Frank Butler, Manager for Annie Oakley.
Master Johnnie Baker, Expert Marksman.

Hurdle Riders.

Joe. Campbell, Jockey.
Ed. Goodrich, Cowboy.
Two Bulls and Kills Without Fear, Indians.

Indian Bareback Riders.

  • Two-Bull.
  • Strikes Three Times.
  • Pines.

Orator.

J. J. McCARTHY

Matron of Camp.

Mrs. LOU DECKER.

Lithograph Collectors.

ED. M. SHOWLES, Superintendent.

Tom Burke, Assistant.
Frank Quinn, Assistant.
Starr Pixley, Assistant.
 

J. A. Bailey's Mechanical Department.

DAN TAYLOR, Superintendent.

John Spohn, Wheelwright.
Eddie Collins (Waxie) Harness Maker.
John Norbury, Blacksmith.
Sam. Allingham, Blacksmith.

Cody and Salsbury Horses.

LEW McKOWN, Superintendent.

S. W. ELLIOTT, Assistant.

J. P. Murphy, Col. Cody's Coachman.
J. Nye, Hurdle Horses.
N. E. Smith, U. S. Cavalry Horses.
J. B. Taylor, Assistant.
T. Farrell, English Horses.
J. J. Burke, Mexican Horses.
J. Murphy, Cossack Horses.
E. Melrose, Indian Horses.
F. F. Fitzhugh, Assistant.
W. R. Brown, Assistant.
J. Sehe, Assistant.
J. McPhillem, Groom.
J. Thompson, Bucking Horses.
G. Schnobrig, French Horses.
G. J. McDougal, Assistant.
F. E. East, German Horses.
H. Ward, Arab Horses.
H. L. Welch, Cowboy Horses.
J. E. Joyce, Assistant.
J. W. Porter, Mules.
Ben Galindo, Buffaloes.
M. Hogan, Train Watchman.
 

Buffalo Bill's Famous Cowboy Band.

WILLIAM SWEENEY, Leader, and Solo B Cornet.

O. L. Bond, Solo Cornet.
Frank Wentworth, Solo Cornet.
Joseph Walsh, First Cornet.
Elmer Parker, Second Cornet.
William Schinsley, Solo Clarionet.
Christian Scetting, Solo Clarionet.
John Grimm, Second Clarionet.
George Michell, Second Clarionet.
Frank Rossi, Piccolo.
Thomas Murphy, Baritone.
Edward Weber, First Alto.
John Howard, Second Alto.
William Wells, Third Alto.
John Galligan, First Trombone.
George Merrill, Second Trombone.
Ernest Lehfeldt, Third Trombone.
Fred Essex, Bb Bass.
W. A. Frank, Eb Bass.
Joseph Keock, Small Drum.
George W. Turner, Bass Drum.

Property Men.

  • CHARLES WICHELHAUSER, In Charge.
  • George Grooch,
  • Joseph McAvoy,
  • Thomas Burke.

Ammunition Department.

  • JOHNNIE BAKER, In Charge.
  • Michael Quinn, Assistant.
  • William Wood.
  • William Searle.

Electric Light Department.

M. B. BAILEY, Superintendent.

C. C. Crowell, Chief Engineer.
P. W. Heermans, Electrician.
H. P. Elexander, Fireman.
J. W. Roberds, Fireman.
R. Kyllo, Search Light.
T. Hollins, Search Light.
E. Laraway, Helper.
Grant G. Wilsie, Helper.
E. Wiebe, Helper.
H. Reaver, Helper.
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Courier Co.

ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT.

 

Ticket Sellers.

Main Ticket Wagon.

  • C. R. Hutchinson,
  • Joseph P. Quaid.
  • Ed. M. Showles.

Outside Tickets.

  • John Tippitts,
  • Lou Decker,
  • Ed. M. Showles.

Down-Town Office.

D. Gurney Spalding.

Down-Town Orator.

John Dougherty.

Reserve Seats.

JULE KEEN, In Charge.

J. Allen Darnaby, Ticket Seller.
Sam. Feldser, Ticket Seller.
Harry Gray, Ticket Seller.

Watchman White Ticket Wagon.

John Stacks.

Watchman Private Office Wagon.

Frank Quinn.

Main Door Tenders.

  • J. P. Brogan,
  • Fred. B. Hutchinson,
  • Morris Kern,
  • Dan. Taylor.

Front Door Watchmen.

  • Ed. Gallinger.
  • Charles Alberts.
  • George Miller.

Reserve Seat Tenders.

  • John Stacks,
  • Starr Pixley,
  • J. J. McCarthy, in charge of Mail.

Side Show.

GEORGE W. FURSMAN, Manager of Privileges.

Orators.

  • Frank Morris,
  • Paul J. Stanton,
  • Ed. M. Showles,
  • John McBride.

Door Tender.

Harry Speigle.

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Courier Co.

TICKET SELLERS.

 

Performers.

Mlle. Georgia, Snake Queen.
Lady with Horse's Mane,
William T. Sapp, Ossified Man.
James Warren, Manager for Sapp.
Mlle. La Mar, Mind Reader.
Allilab's Cat Orchestra.
Kotara and Kinura, Japanese.
Harry Walker and Wife, Royal Marionettes.
Frank Walters, Blue Man.
"Let 'er go Sackett,"

Side Show Band.

L. Sacketto, Leader.
A. Vitelli, E Clarionet.
F. Recchia, B Clarionet.
T. Flocco, Solo B Cornet.
F. Carrozza, B Cornet.
A. Granese, B Baritone.
D. Flocco, B Tenor.
G. Moccia, E Alto.
A. Bevivino, Bass Drum.
D. Barbieri, Snare Drum.

Concert.

  • The Deagans,
  • The Rielleys,
  • Harry St. Julien,
  • E. J. Kershaw,
  • Cloud and Kershaw,
  • Shaffer and Clarke.

Concert Orchestra.

  • Frank Wentworth,
  • Elmer Parlett,
  • William Frank,
  • George, Mitchell,
  • Edward Weber,
  • George Merrill,
  • Fred. Essex.

Side Show Canvasmen.

  • A.C. WILSON, In Charge.
  • W. Gibson,
  • John Tomsett,
  • John Proelx,
  • W. Wilson,
  • L. De Morci.

Confectionary Department.

  • C. L. RAMSEY, Superintendent.
  • J. M. Dougherty,
  • A. F. Partridge,
  • A. B. Cline,
  • R. H. West,
  • M. F. Troy,
  • F. M. Baker,
  • C. E. Fern,
  • W. H. McCloskey,
  • J. H. White,
  • W. N. Noble,
  • F. E. Knowles,
  • C. W. Spadi.
 

Programmes.

J. & H. MAYER, Publishers.

J. E. Allien, Solicitor.
W. R. Harburger, Representative.
John Leahy,
Charles Myers,
Ed. Manly,
Frank Quinn,

Razor-Backs.

JOHN McLAUGHLIN, Superintendent.

WILLIAM MILLER, Assistant.

Harry Skeen, Car Repairer.
William Nixon, Poles.
John Norris, Poles.
Morris Doody, Watchman.
Joe Donahue, Watchman.
William Remack, Chandelierman.
Phil. Cosgrove, Trainman.
Harry Sutton, Trainman.
Joe Rosenberger, Trainman.
Lou Nares, Trainman.
Joe Randall, Trainman.
J. Swartz, Trainman.

Cook House.

J. E. ROBBINS, Caterer.

GEORGE B. DENNIS, Treasurer.

CHARLES W. PETTY, Advance Agent.

HOMER BAILEY, Advance Agent.

Cooks.

WILLIAM G. HATCH, Chef.

John O'Byrne, Assistant.
Harvey Deagon, Assistant.
James H. Tobin, Assistant.
James B. Clarke, Assistant.
Frank W. Fuller, Assistant.
Charles Fredericks, Assistant.

Pastry Cooks.

W. J. Thrall, First,

J. P. Higgins, Assistant.

Butchers.

S. E. Bently, First,

John Eastwood, Assistant.

 

Camp Fires.

  • Frank H. O'Clair, First,
  • Alex. J. Ewing, Assistant.

Pan Washer.

George B. Stillwell.

Wood Chopper.

Robert C. Clay.

Laundryman.

James J. Foley.

Watermen.

  • Chauncey Hover, First,
  • Geo. J. Black, Assistant.

Waiters.

ED. UNGER, Head Waiter.

Table No. 1—Staff.

  • M. B. Lester,
  • M. Martin
  • M. C. McGrath, Coffee Boy.

Table No. 2—Cowboy Band.

  • T. D. Sullivan,
  • J. Fisk.
  • E. A. Hughes, Coffee Boy.

Table No. 3—Privilege.

  • G. W. Burwell,
  • J. Emery,
  • W. O'Hara.
  • N. B. Graham, Coffee Boy.

Table No. 4—American Soldiers.

  • B. Cook.
  • L. Keagy, Coffee Boy.
  • J. Finlin.

Table No. 5—Cossacks and Mexicans.

J. Butler.

Table No. 6—English, French and German Soldiers.

  • C. B. Lackey.
  • A. Cassidy, Coffee Boy,
  • C. J. Whitey.

Table No. 7—Indians.

  • Ed. West.
  • C. Longmore, Coffee Boy.
 

Workingmen's Tables—Nos. 1, 2 and 3.

  • E. F. Walton,
  • R. L. Rush,
  • C. H. Black,
  • T. Lawrence,
  • W. J. O'Hara,
  • B. Smith,
  • H. J. Leonard,
  • E. D. Medbury,
  • G.E. Keagy, Coffee Boy.
  • J. H. Montgomery, Bread Cutter.
  • W. Sweeny, Bread Cutter.
  • B. F. Armstrong, Bread Cutter.

Dish Washers.

  • B. McGrath,
  • W. W. Twinner.

Dish Packers.

  • Lon Martin,
  • Thomas Mullens.

Silver Washer.

J. Gurber

Boss Canvasman.

W. J. Cushman.

Porters.

WILLIAM BAKER, Head Porter.

Walter Beckwith, Porter Car 50.
Ed. Schaeffer, Porter Car 51.
Harry Reaville, Porter Car 52.
Frank Kenyon, Porter Car 53.
John Lenhart, Porter Car 54.
John Noble, Porter Car 55.
A. Fox, Porter Car 56.
R. H. Mack, Porter Cars 150 and 168.

Drivers.

WILLIAM WELTON, Superintendent.

ED. McLAUGHLIN, Assistant Supt.

  • HELPERS.
  • Frank King,
  • L. Morton,
  • Harry Garman.

Eight-Horse Drivers.

  • James Rushenberger,
  • John Coleman,
  • Harry Moran.
 

Six-Horse Drivers.

  • Dave Wilson,
  • Frank Wilson,
  • John Henry,
  • James Dalglish,
  • William Fitch,
  • Tom McKernan,
  • John Schlosser,
  • C. Clark.

Four-Horse Drivers.

  • Harry Rogers,
  • Eddie Lewis,
  • Chas. Losso,
  • M. J. Smith,
  • C. A. Byers,
  • C. Grothe,
  • John Stinson,
  • Ed. Humphrey,
  • J. Williams.

Pull-Up Teams.

  • Ed. Fletcher,
  • William Thatcher,
  • Nelson Doran,
  • Harry Johnson.

Private Groom.

Thomas Kelley.

Lot Man.

William Ingham.

Ushers.

WILLIAM McCUNE, Chief.

JOHN W. MURRAY, Assistant.

Ed. Barry, Section A.
Will Gallinger, Section B.
Mike Harrigan, Section C.
Tom Cummings, Section D.
John Cullen, Section E.
Pat Murphy, Section F.
F. Berry, Section G.
R. Ryan, Section H.
W. Curtis, Section J.
M. Mack, Section K.
J. Stubbs, Section L.
A. Hagemann, Director.
John Kelly, Wardrobe.

Blue Seats.

  • J. Gregory,
  • John Curling,
  • J. Welch,
  • J. Cusick,
  • E. Larraway,
  • Wm. Marshall,
  • William Hutton,
  • Archer Bagley,
  • J. Purdy.
  • C. Stacey.
 

Canvasmen.

Big Top.

  • JAKE PLATT, Superintendent.
  • ED. LACEY, First Assistant.
  • THOMAS McAVOY, Second Assistant.
  • John Ward,
  • Harry Segil,
  • M. Quinlan,
  • M. Harrigan,
  • Frank Berry,
  • Ed. Renner,
  • John Cullen,
  • Charles Jackson,
  • John Kelly,
  • George Foos,
  • Charles Alberts,
  • W. J. Gallinger,
  • Ed. Gallinger,
  • William Hutton,
  • George Miller,
  • J. M. Purdy,
  • Robert Ryan,
  • W. J. Marshall,
  • Ed. Barry,
  • John Carney,
  • Fred Hoffman,
  • J. J. Gregory,
  • P. Murphy,
  • George Simkins,
  • John Holland,
  • Paul Maletke,
  • Thomas Cummings,
  • Ike Limburger,
  • M. Mack,
  • Arthur Hagemann,
  • James Carey,
  • Walter Curtis,
  • Ernest Yelland,
  • M. Jones,
  • John Cusick,
  • George Baker,
  • Harry Stone,
  • Ed. Canfield,
  • Frank Jones,
  • C. W. Ellis,
  • Charles Snyder,
  • Lewis Strong,
  • John Henry,
  • Gus Muller,
  • John Curling,
  • Charles Stacey,
  • Frank Filkins.
 

Reserve Seats.

M. QUINLAN, In charge.

ED. BARRY, Assistant.

Fred Hoffman, Toe Leveler.
M. J. Purdy, Plank Leveler.
Frank Powers, Jack Setter.
Frank Miller, Jack Setter.
P. McCabe, Jack Setter.
R. Ryan, Jack Setter.
Lyman Mayo, Toe pin Man.
W. J. Marshall, Plank-up Man.
B. Brown, Plank-up Man.
Frank Temple, Plank-up Man.
John Sullivan, Plank-up Man.
George Amos, Side-wall Man.
James Dunkleberger, Side-wall Man.
Ed. Mayes, Toe-pin Driver.
John Bennett, Toe-pin Driver.
Frank Miller, Toe-pin Driver.
W. Sharp, Toe-pin Driver.
M. Harrigan, Block Boy.

Front End.

ED. LACEY, Superintendent.

JOHN WARD, In charge of Seats.

FRANK BERRY, Assistant.

Walter Curtis, Toe Leveler.
George Foos, Plank Leveler.
James Carey, Stringer Setter.
George Baker, Stringer Setter.
John Kelly, Jack Setter.
W. Hutton, Jack Setter.
Arthur Hagemann, Jack Setter.
M. Jones, Jack Setter.
W. J. Gallinger, Toe-pin Man
Ernest Yelland, Toe-pin Driver.
John Cusick, Toe-pin Driver.
Harry Segil, Toe-pin Driver.
Ed. Canfield, Toe-pin Driver.
Frank Filkins, Toe-pin Driver.
Frank Jones, Toe-pin Driver.
Thomas Cummings, Block Boy.
 

Back End.

THOS. McAVOY, Superintendent.

JOHN CURLING, In charge of Seats.

JOHN CULLEN, Assistant.

John Carney, Toe Leveler.
George Simkins, Plank Leveler.
J. J. Gregory, Toe-pin Man.
P. Murphy, Stringer Setter.
Paul Meletke, Stringer Setter.
Charles Stacey, Jack Setter.
Charles Jackson, Jack Setter.
Harry Stone, Jack Setter.
C. W. Ellis, Jack Setter.
John Holland, Toe-pin Driver.
Charles Snyder, Toe-pin Driver.
Ike Limburger, Toe-pin Driver.
Gus Muller, Toe-pin Driver.
Lon Strong, Toe-pin Driver.
M. Mack, Block Boy.

Front Door.

  • Charles Alberts,
  • Ed. Gallinger,
  • George Miller.
  • Ed. Renner, In charge of Stake Wagons Nos. 6-11.
  • John Henry, Assistant.

Horse Tents.

  • H. VAN BUREN, Superintendent.
  • John Kitner, In charge of Stake Wagon No. 14.
  • Frank Powers,
  • George Amos,
  • Lyman Mayo,
  • James Dunkelberger,
  • Ed. Mayes,
  • John Bennett,
  • W. Sharp,
  • Frank Miller,
  • P. McCabe,
  • John Sullivan,
  • Frank Miller,
  • George Price,
  • B. Brown,
  • Frank Temple.

Dressing Room and Backing.

J. A. EBERLE, In charge.

BACKING MEN.

W. Gannon,
G. Murray, ) Right Curtain.
A. Loftos,
J. Splan,
S. Mellon,
T. Keegan, ) Center Curtain.
J. Shaw,
W. Rabold, ) Left Curtain.
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Courier Co.

FAMOUS COWBOY BAND.

 

ORDER OF PARADE

  • HARRY GRAY, LEADER OF PARADE.
  • COL. W. F. CODY, IN CARRIAGE.
  • BAND OF INDIANS.
  • BAND WAGON No. 1—COWBOY BAND.
  • BAND OF INDIANS.
  • GERMAN SOLDIERS.
  • ELECTRIC LIGHT ENGINE No. 1 (BUFFALO BILL).
  • COWBOYS.
  • ARABS.
  • INDIANS.
  • MISS ANNIE OAKLEY AND JOHNNIE BAKER.
  • FRENCH SOLDIERS.
  • MEXICANS.
  • INDIANS.
  • IRISH LANCERS.
  • BAND WAGON No.2.
  • INDIANS.
  • COSSACKS.
  • INDIANS.
  • GAUCHOS.
  • DEADWOOD MAIL COACH.
  • COWBOYS.
  • AMERICAN SOLDIERS.
  • ELECTRIC LIGHT ENGINE No. 2 (NATE SALSBURY).
 

PROGRAMME

OVERTURE—"Star Spangled Banner." COWBOY BAND, William Sweeney, Leader.

1. GRAND REVIEW—Introducing the Rough Riders of the World, Indians, Cowboys, Mexicans, Cossacks, Gauchos, Arabs, Scouts, Guides, American Negroes, and detachments of fully equipped Regular Soldiers of the Armies of America, England, France, Germany, and Russia.

2. MISS ANNIE OAKLEY—Celebrated Shot, who will illustrate her dexterity in the use of fire-arms.

3. HORSE RACE—Between a Cowboy, a Cossack, a Mexican, an Arab, a Gaucho and an Indian, on Spanish-Mexican, Bronco, Russian, Indian and Arabian horses.

4. PONY EXPRESS—A former Pony Post-Rider will show how the Letters and Telegrams of the Republic were distributed across the immense Continent previous to the building of railways and the telegraph.

5. ILLUSTRATING A PRAIRIE EMIGRANT TRAIN CROSSING THE PLAINS.—It is attacked by marauding Indians, who are in turn repulsed by "Buffalo Bill" and a number of Scouts and Cowboys.

6. A GROUP OF RIFFIAN ARABIAN HORSEMEN—Will illustrate their style of Horsemanship, together with Native Sports and Pastimes.

7. JOHNNIE BAKER—Celebrated Young American Marksman.

8. COSSACKS—Of the Caucasus of Russia, in feats of Horsemanship, Native Dances, etc.

9. A GROUP OF MEXICANS—From Old Mexico, who will illustrate the use of the Lasso, and perform various feats of Horsemanship.

10. HURDLE RACE—Between Primitive Riders mounted on Western Bronco Ponies that never jumped a hurdle until just before opening of present exhibition.

11. COWBOY FUN—Picking Objects from the Ground, Lassoing Wild Horses, Riding the Buckers, etc.

12. MILITARY MUSICAL DRILL—By a detachment from the Seventh United States Cavalry from Fort Riley; detachment from the Fifth Royal Irish Lancers; detachment from French Dragoons of Republic Francaise ; detachment from Garde Cuirassiers of His Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II.

13. ATTACK ON THE DEADWOOD MAIL COACH BY INDIANS—Repulse of the Indians and Rescue of the Stage, Passengers and Mail by "Buffalo Bill" and his attendant Cowboys. N.B.—This is the identical Deadwood Mail Coach, famous as having carried many people who lost their lives between Deadwood and Cheyenne nineteen years ago. Now the most famed vehicle extant.

14. RACING BETWEEN INDIAN BOYS ON BAREBACK HORSES.

15. TEN MINUTES WITH THE ROUGH RIDERS OF THE WORLD.

16. COL. W. F. CODY ("Buffalo Bill") in his unique feats of Sharpshooting at full speed.

17. BUFFALO HUNT—As it was in the Far West of North America. "Buffalo Bill" and Indians. The last of the only known native herd.

18. ATTACK ON SETTLERS' CABINS—Rescue by "Buffalo Bill" and a band of Cowboys, Scouts, etc.

19. SALUTE—CONCLUSION.

 

BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST SEASON 1896.

Philadelphia, Pa.

MONDAY, April 6. William Welton arrived at our grounds, 11th and York streets, with baggage stock from Carversville, Pa.

THURSDAY, April 9. Wagons, canvas, stakes, etc., were shipped from the Barnum & Bailey Winter-quarters, Bridgeport, Conn. Wardrobe, buffaloes and electric light wagons were shipped from the Buffalo Bill grounds, Ambrose Park, South Brooklyn, and met the train at Jersey City at 10 P.M. Train left Jersey City over the P. & R. R. R. for Philadelphia, Friday morning, 3 A.M., and arrived in Philadelphia, Pa., at 7:30 A. M.

SATURDAY, April 11. Albert E. Sheible and Morris Kern arrived in New York City on the American Line Steamship "New York," with the German, French and Irish soldiers. Chas. Trego arrived this morning with the Bronco stock from Coatsville. All canvas was put up to-day.

SUNDAY, April 12. W. O. Snyder arrived this evening with the Indians from Pine Ridge Agency.

MONDAY, April 13. Col. W. F. Cody, Mexicans and Cowboys arrived.

TUESDAY, April 14. Commenced rehearsing. The first accident of the season happened to-day; an Indian by the name of Hawk Wing had his arm broken by being thrown from his horse and was taken to the hospital.

WEDNESDAY, April 15. Rehearsed all day.

THURSDAY, April 16. Sad news came into camp this morning; it was the account of the death of Mrs. Baker, wife of Johnny Baker; she died at 7 A. M., in New York City, of pneumonia. We gave a full dress rehearsal at night by electric light; everything went off smoothly.

FRIDAY, April 17. We gave a parade two hours this morning. The weather was very warm, and every one came back nearly worn out.

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W. H. GARDNER.

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DEXTER W. FELLOWS.

 

SATURDAY, April 18. Opening day. We started promptly on time, 2 P. M., and, considering the first performance, everything went off very smoothly. Gen. Nelson Miles was a guest of Col. W. F. Cody in the afternoon. Cowboy Walter Scott was thrown during the bucking-horse act and badly shaken up, but with Scotty's usual good luck, he came out all right. James A. Bailey was here to-day, but returned to New York City in the afternoon. Business was fair at the afternoon performance and good at night.

SUNDAY, April 19. Mrs. Baker's funeral to-day in New York City, and she was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn. Wm. Sweeney, leader of the band, and Jule Keene went home to attend the funeral. We all took it easy to-day and rested after the usual strain of opening day.

MONDAY, April 20. U.S. Senator Frank Mondell, of Wyoming, was a guest of Col. W. F. Cody to-day. Heavy thunder-storm at the close of the evening performance.

Business in the afternoon fair; in the evening immense.

TUESDAY, April 21. To-day was ideal show weather in every particular and business according.

We had an immense house tonight. May Lille, wife of Gordon W. Lille (Pawnee Bill), was a guest of Miss Annie Oakley to-day.

WEDNESDAY, April 22. Weather was too warm to-day to be comfortable. Col. Prentice Ingram and family were guests of Col. W. F. Cody to-day.

Business fair at both performances.

THURSDAY, April 23. To-day weather was cold and clear. Gordon W. Lille (Pawnee Bill) was a guest of the show in the evening. Cowboy Bob Wilkinson was thrown from the bucking horse "Two Bear Outlaw" and lost his false teeth. This is the first accident of this nature that has happened in the history of the Wild West Show.

Business in the afternoon fair; in the evening every reserve seat was sold.

FRIDAY, April 24. Cold northeastern winds accompanied by rain all day and evening. Dan Waldron, of the Annex, closed here. William Langhan, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who was supply agent for the Wild West Co for several years, was a visitor here to-day.

Business accordingly light.

 

SATURDAY, April 25. Cold northwestern winds, but clear. Everybody was busy to-day and a great deal of bustle was apparent around camp over the natural anxiety that always surrounds the first move of the season, but we got off in good time and the last wagon left the grounds at 11.45 P. M.

Business, afternoon and evening, good.

Lot in Philadelphia, 11th and York streets.

Arena, 217 x 266.

En Route.

SUNDAY, April 26. This, our first move, was a long one, and accompanied with many annoyances and some loss of property. We left Philadelphia at 3 A. M., over the B. & O. R. R. Between Baltimore and Washington the cook-house canvas caught on fire and was completely destroyed; coming into Washington the car containing the cook-house wagon had a hot journal and burnt off; the car was set out for a new pair of wheels, which delayed the second section three hours; there was a combination of hot boxes and flat wheels that compelled us to run slow. Both sections stopped at Brunswick, Md., to water stock. First section arrived in Cumberland, Md., at 7.30 P. M., second section at 11.56 P. M. Both sections were side-tracked until morning.

Cumberland, Md.

MONDAY, April 27. It commenced to rain at 2 P. M. and kept it up until 8.30 P.M. Albert E. Scheible, business manager, closed here and left on the 8.30 train for New York City. J. Byrns, an Irish soldier, was taken sick with pneumonia and went to the hospital. Lot at Valley Spring and Fairview avenues, clay and bad to pick up on. Got out of Cumberland at 2 A. M.

Arena, 173 x 344.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening fair.

Clarksburg, W. Va.

TUESDAY, April 28. Arrived in town at 9.15. We were late in getting up. Doors did not open until 2.15 P. M. Johnny Franz, Cowboy rider, was thrown during the afternoon petformance and had his right arm broken above the wrist.

Lot. Jackson lot under Pinnecineck Hill.

Arena 182 x 322.

Business, in the afternoon good, in the evening fair.

Parkersburg, W. Va.

WEDNESDAY, April 29. Arrived in town at 7.15 A. M. Four-horse teamster John W. Henry had his   collar-bone broken while dumping a plank wagon. T. W. Chamberlain, of the U. S. Cavalry, went to Cincinnati hospital sick with pneumonia. W. C. Bradford, programme seller, was called to Denver, Col., on account of the death of his father. It was noticeable that Fred Hutchinson was very happy to-day. He was a visitor to the afternoon performance in company with Miss Julia Wait, a charming resident here.

Lot, Stephenson's Meadows on 7th Street.

Arena, 172 x 339.

Business in the afternoon good, in the evening fair.

Chillicothe, Ohio.

THURSDAY, April 30. First section arrived in town at 4.30; second section at 7.30 A. M. We had a long haul of two and one-half miles to the lot, which we found in terrible condition, owing to heavy rains for the past two days. It took twenty-two horses to pull stringer wagon on lot. Cook-house wagon broke front axle on the way to the lot in the morning. We got off the lot at 12.30 A. M.

Lot, Driving Park.

Arena, 174 x 337.

Business in the afternoon fair, in the evening light.

Ironton, Ohio.

FRIDAY, May 1. First section arrived in town at 4.30; second section arrived at 7.15. This is the first decent lot of the season, up to date, and the working force are happy for the first time since we have been out. Heavy thunder-showers at 5 P. M., but cleared up fine before doors opened.

Lot, Sixth and Maple avenues.

Arena, 171 x 343.

Business at both performances good.

Washington, Ohio.

SATURDAY, May 2. We came from Ironton in four sections; last section arrived at 10.15 A. M. We were late in getting up, so did not open doors until 1.30. Heavy thunder-storms at 5 P. M. accompanied with heavy wind. James P. Anderson leaves for his home, Columbus, Ohio, to spend Sunday with his family.

Lot, Columbus avenue, known as the old Fair Grounds.

Arena, 167 x 336.

Business in the afternoon good, in the evening fair.

 

Cincinnati, Ohio.

SUNDAY, May 3. Arrived in town at 8.30 A.M. We put up all the blue seats and canvas we had. Lot was very narrow, so every one was very much crowded. We had a new arrival in the shape of a buffalo calf this morning. Eddie Holland, of the ammunition department, was taken sick with pneumonia and sent to the hospital.

Weather fine and clear.

MONDAY, May 4. Weather fine. Otto Lighthouse, a German soldier, was thrown from his horse during the Grand Entree in the evening and had his left shoulder dislocated. Robert Grant, bronco-blacksmith, got caught between a horse and the guy-rope and his left arm was broken just above the wrist. James P. Anderson returned from Columbus, Ohio, from a pleasant visit to his family. Cincinnati was once the home of J. T. McCaddon, Charles and Fred Hutchinson, who were kept busy entertaining friends, among whom were Mrs. Young, mother of Merritt Young, the jolly treasurer of the Barnum & Bailey Show. "Governor" John Robinson, of circus fame, John Rettig, celebrated artist, and Jans Echert, who was once connected with the Adam Forepaugh Show, William Lushbaugh, maker of our canvas, Nelson Strobridge, of the Strobridge

Lithographing Co., and Billy Joyce, "the showman's friend" of the B. & O. R. R., were guests of the show to-day. In the evening we had about 150 electrical people, and M. B. Bailey was kept busy answering questions about the plant.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening over 4,000 people were turned away.

TUESDAY, May 5. Weather fine. J. Frost, of the Irish Lancers, was taken sick with pneumonia and went to hospital to-day. Gay Hudson Piller, Cowboy rider, went over the ropes to-night; the horse knocked down a beacon light, but no one was hurt. Tambourine McCarty, Ken a Kamis and wife, the Japanese fencers, of the Annex, closed here. J. T. McCaddon and M. B. Bailey left for Chicago on the 8.30 train on business for the company.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening immense.

Lot, Ludlow avenue and Milk Creek, Cumminsville.

Arena, 169 x 430.

Hamilton, Ohio.

WEDNESDAY, May 6. Weather fine.

Lot, High street; one-mile haul.

Arena, 178 x 324.

Business in the afternoon good, in the evening fair.

 

Richmond, Ind.

THURSDAY, May 7. Arrived in town as 6 A. M. Weather fine.

Lot, corner 19th and F streets; two-mile haul.

Arena, 185 x 360.

Business in the afternoon fair, in the evening fair.

Indianapolis, Ind.

FRIDAY, May 8. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. Put everything up we had; lot in fair condition but hilly. J. T. McCaddon returned from Chicago in the morning and M. B. Bailey in the evening.

Business in the afternoon good, in the evening splendid house.

SATURDAY, May 9. Weather very warm, 103° at 5 P. M. James Thomas, programme seller, closed here. J. T. McCaddon left to-night for Chicago and St. Louis. Dan Taylor left for St. Louis to erect a grand stand for our week's engagement there.

Lot on West Washington street and White River.

Arena, 212 x 411.

Business in the afternoon fair, in the evening good.

Anderson, Ind.

SUNDAY, May 10. We arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. Did not put up big top until 5 P. M. Weather very warm, clear and still.

MONDAY, May 11. Weather very warm in the morning. At 12.45 heavy thunder-storm accompanied with wind came up. Side and back walls were let down, and no damage was done except to the awning over the candy stands, which was blown down. Doors did not open until 1.45 P. M.

Business fair at both performances.

Lot, Dudley's Field, corner Eighth avenue and White River.

Arena, 178 x 372.

Columbus, Ind.

TUESDAY, MAY 12. We had a good run considering its length, 126 miles, with two transfers. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. Weather was fine all day, but at night we had heavy thunder with every indication of a heavy wind. All extra stakes were put down and every precaution was taken for a blow, but none came.

Business light all day, no one had any money.

Lot, Crump's Driving Park.

Arena, 178 x 333.

 

Louisville, Ky.

WEDNESDAY, May 13. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. Had a two-mile haul to lot. We put up every yard of canvas and every seat we had. Cowboy Ed. Goodrich was thrown in the bucking act and secured three ugly scalp wounds. J. T. McCaddon returned this morning from Chicago. Our new buffalo calf commenced his show career to-day and went around the arena with its mother in the buffalo hunt, making quite a hit. J. G. Elgin, of B. & O. S. W. R. R. and Dr. H. Ray Cannon were guests of Fred Hutchinson.

Business in the afternoon good, in the evening big.

THURSDAY, May 14. Weather clear but high west winds. After the show at night there was quite an excitement around the camp over the police trying to arrest a colored pickpocket. Several shots were fired, but, as is usual in such cases, none took effect.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Oak and Preston streets.

Arena, 220 x 440.

Owensboro, Ky.

FRIDAY, May 15. Arrived in town at 7.45 A. M., a good run considering the road we came over. This is close to the home of W. T. Sapp, of the Annex, consequently he had lots of company all the day. His father and mother and two brothers spent most of the day with him. A street car ran into the back end of the plank wagon, No. 43, in the evening, smashing the front end of ths car but with no damage to the wagon. As usual in such cases the show was held up to the tune of $10.00.

Business good both performances.

Lot, Main street and String Row.

Arena, 185 x 362.

Evansville, Ind.

SATURDAY, May 16. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M.; commenced to rain at 9 A. M., and poured down until 12 noon. Harry Barnum, Charley Petty, and Dexter W. Fellows, press agent, were arrested last night on suspicion that they were confidence men and fined $25.00 each. J. W. Frost, of the Irish Lancers, and F. W. Chamberlain, of the U. S. Cavalry, who were left in the hospital at Cincinnati, came on to-day and reported for duty. Second   section got off first to-night, consequently about forty people were left and had to come through on the first section. H. B. Christy a guest of Fred Hutchinson.

Business in the afternoon good, in the evening big.

Arena, 177 x 356.

Lot, Washington avenue and Garvin street.

St. Louis, Mo.

SUNDAY, May 17. Arrived in town at 1.30 P. M., a good run considering distance traveled. Everything on the lot at 4.30, and all up before dark. Byrns, the Irish soldier, who left at Cumberland, Md., joined us again to-day and went on duty. Nate Salsbury, manager of the Wild West, came on from Chicago, and met us at the lot to-day. We found the lot large but uneven, with every indication of being bad in wet weather. J. Allen Darnaby tells an amusing story, much to the delight of Messrs. Hutchinson, Showles and Stanton.

MONDAY, May, 18. We opened with the worst kind of weather—it was warm and sultry all day; at 9.30 A. M. a heavy thunder-storm, and another one at 10.15; it was so severe that the concert audience left in a body after the second act. Mrs. Col. W. F. Cody and daughter Irma, of North Platte, Neb., came on for a short visit. The Hawleys joined the Annex here to-day.

TUESDAY, May, 19. Weather very bad—rained hard all morning. There was a severe electric storm that lasted from 7 until 11 P. M.; it put the arena in a frightful condition. The storm did us no harm, only from a business standpoint. We wondered that anyone came. Nate Salsbury returned to Chicago to-day. Johnny Baker made quite a hit in his act, when he stood on his head in the mud.

When the weather gets bad and the mud gets deep
  And things are not coming our way,
Anderson will quietly make a sneak,
  And go back by the horse-tents and pray.

He will go away back of the bronco tent,
  And kneel down by a bale of hay;
On bended knees and with upturned eyes,
  This "old circus man" will pray.

He wants fine weather on all mud lots,
  And on all sand lots he prays for rain;
We all feel safe when Anderson prays,
  For he never prays in vain.

 

WEDNESDAY, May 20. Our superintendent, Jas. P. Anderson, was caught back of the bronco tent this morning praying for clear weather, and as usual the change was quick and favorable. At 10 A. M. the sun commenced shining for the first time in three days, consequently we had a fair house in the afternoon and a big house in the evening, and Mr. Anderson smiled for the first time this week,; in fact it was the only smile we saw during the engagement.

THURSDAY, May 21. Another storm this morning, which put the arena in a frightful condition. At 5.30 P. M. a hail-storm from the southwest, and hail-stones fell that measured 2 3/4 x 1 3/4 inches. No harm done outside of breaking twelve arc-lamp globes. Business light as a natural consequence.

FRIDAY, May 22. To-day the weather cleared up a little and gave one good day, consequently good business; every chair in the house was sold at 7.30. Col. Cody's horse fell this afternoon and caught his foot, but did him no injury. Cowboys Bill Brace and Bob Wilkinson were thrown to-night in the bucking horse act. The Order of the Mystic Shrine came out in a body to see us to-night.

SATURDAY, May 23. Weather moderately fair, and business on the light side. Jockey rider Joe Campbell's horse fell and caught him, and he was carried out in a helpless condition. It was found that he had dislocated his shoulder, besides having a badly strained neck. Eddie Holland ammunition man, who was left in the Cincinnati Hospital, joined us this morning. The arena still remained in a frightful condition.

SUNDAY, May 24. We gave two shows to-day for the first time on Sunday since we were at the World's Fair, Chicago. Business fair in the afternoon, but at night we had the lightest house of the season up to date. We had a hard pick-up at night, as everything had to be carried off of the lot. Taking the week as a whole, it has been a hard one—severe storms, lot in bad condition, and every one glad to get away. Lot, Manchester Road and Compton Ave. Arena, 222 x 451.

I have not seen a smile in seven days,
  Even the horses wear a frown;
Business bad and weather worse,
  We are glad to leave this town.

 

Litchfield, Ill.

MONDAY, May 25. Arrived in town at 5 30 A. M. Weather very threatening all day. We all dreaded rain, as the condition of the lot and streets was bad. J. T. McCaddon left for Chicago to-night. Cowboy Ed. Goodrich, who was hurt in Louisville, Ky., went to work again to-day.

Business in the afternoon good; in the evening fair.

Lot, Driving Park.

Arena, 175 x 354.

Decatur, Ill.

TUESDAY, May, 26. We arrived in town at 5.45 A. M., had a one and one-half mile haul to lot. Ticket taker Morris Kern received a dispatch to-day, notifying him of the death of his father in New York City. He left for that city to-night. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Curtiss, of Moweaqua, Ill., were guests of M. B. Bailey this evening.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 175 x 351.

Lincoln, Ill.

WEDNESDAY, May 27. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. Weather very threatening all day, and at 5 P. M. it commenced to look quite dangerous, and for an hour our canvas was in a dangerous condition. Doors did not open until 7.30 on account of high wind. Capt. Bogardus and son Ed., of Elkhart City, Ill., we reguests of the Show to-day. Cowboy Ed. Hughes had his knee hurt in the bucking-horse act this afternoon. We had quite an excitement to-night. We were taking down when the buffalo bull got away from the cowboys and started on a rampage around the canvas. Pedro Esquevel's horse ran through a barb wire fence, cutting Pedro's face badly. All work was stopped, and every one got on top of wagons, except Mr. Anderson, who got under one, and no amount of persuasion could get him out until the buffalo was safe in the car.

Business fair at both performances.

Lot, Hamilton avenue and McLain street.

Arena 179 x 340.

Peoria, Ill.

THURSDAY, May 28. We arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. Long haul to lot—two and one-half miles. We found a good dry-weather lot, and were fortu-   nate in having no rain. We received the news this morning of the terrible cyclone in St. Louis, and we all felt thankful to think we got out of St. Louis when we did, as the lot we had there was directly in the path of the storm. Ed. Hopkins, of the transportation department, closed here and left for Philadelphia.

Business, turn-away at both performances.

Lot, Lake View Park.

Arena, 230 x 390.

Bloomington, Ill.

FRIDAY, May 29. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One-mile haul to the lot.

Business good both performances.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 197 x 375.

Champaign, Ill.

SATURDAY, May 30. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. At 8.30 P. M. a heavy thunder-storm came up, accompanied by wind, and lasted for one hour. J. W. Jones, a long distance pedestrian, who is walking from New York City to San Francisco via Chicago and New Orleans, called and spent the greater part of the day with us. He is accompanied by his dog, who is to make the whole trip with him.

Business—this being Decoration Day, business was of course, as should be expected, big at both performances.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 174 x 350.

Chicago, Ill.

SUNDAY, May 31. We arrived in town at 6.30. Unloaded at 70th street and Illinois Central R. R. As we were to open the Coliseum, we did not have to put up only the two horse tents, side show, cook tents and Indian tepees. We found a number of ladies waiting our arrival, among whom were Mrs. Jule Keene, Mrs. Wm. Sweeney, Mrs. McCune, Mrs. Chas. Hutchinson, Mrs. McCaddon, Mrs. M. B. Bailey. It made quite a family reunion and every one looked happy. Finn & Mack of the Annex closed to-day. We saw Maj. Burke on Sunday for the first time since we left Cincinnati, Ohio. Every one is busy cleaning up for a long parade to-morrow.

Weather clear and cool.

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THE DEAGONS

EDWIN H. KITTIE

Refined Comedy Sketch Team.

One of the Principal Features with the Buffalo Bill Concert, Season 1896

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Not a Tiresome Moment to the Audience! With Every Second Goes a Laugh!

PERMANENT ADDRESS, NEW YORK CLIPPER.

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With Buffalo Bill's Wild West Season of 1896.

CLOUD AND KERSHAW

TWO IRISH TALKERS, SINGERS and DANCERS.

We just Talk, Sing, and Dance, the audience does the rest, that's all.

ORIGINATORS AND COMPOSERS OF EVERYTHING WE DO.

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PERMANENT ADDRESS, OLYMPIC THEATRE, CHICAGO, ILL.

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LOUIS SACKETTO, BANDMASTER.

AN UP-TO-DATE Side Show Band OF TEN PIECES.

Second season with Buffalo Bill's Wild West. All sight-readers, playing everything from the hottest kind of Ballyhoo Music to the finest and most difficult works of some of the Best Masters.

  • L. Sacketto, Leader.
  • A. Vitelli, E-flat Clarinet.
  • F. Recchia, B-flat Clarinet.
  • T. Flocco, Solo, B-flat Cornet.
  • F. Carrozza, B-flat Cornet.
  • A. Granese, B-flat Baritone.
  • D. Flocco, B-flat Tenor.
  • G. Moccia, E-flat Alto.
  • A. Bevivino, Bass Drum.
  • D. Barbieri, Snare Drum.

ADDRESS, 759 SOUTH 8TH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

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HARRY ST. JULIAN.

HARRY ST. JULIAN

Female. Impersonator .

SECOND SEASON WITH BUFFALO BILL'S ANNEX.

PERMANENT ADDRESS, NEW YORK CLIPPER, N. Y. CITY.

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VERSATILE ARTISTS THE RIELLEYS IN THEIR LAUGHABLE ACT INTITLED LITTLE OF EVERYTHING

 

THE BEST AND CHEAPEST NUMBERED COUPON - TICKETS

GLOBE TICKET COMPANY

New York Office: 1440 Broadway, Cor. 40th. Western Branch: 328 Dearborn St., Chicago.

917-19 FILBERT ST., PHILADELPHIA.

World-renowned for their Superiority over all others. Printed on the Best Calendered Card, in the neatest style and with the greatest accuracy. We guarantee NO MISTAKES.

 

ROYAL BLUE LINE

BETWEEN NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON

Via Baltimore and Ohio R. R. FASTEST, FINEST AND SAFEST TRAINS IN THE WORLD.

The entire equipment is brand-new, and consists of the finest Baggage Cars, Coaches, Parlor, Sleeping and Dining Cars ever built by the Pullman Company. The Trains are vestibuled from end to end and protected by Pullman's improved

ANTI-TELESCOPING DEVICE,AND LIGHTED BY PINTSCH GAS.

TICKET OFFICES, CAMDEN STATION AND CORNER BALTIMORE AND CALVERT STREETS.

 

The New York Confection Company

S. J. EVERITT, MANAGER.

MANUFACTURERS OF EVERITT'S FINE CONFECTIONERY FOR RAILROADS, CIRCUSES, EXCURSIONS, ETC

PUT UP IN SEALED PACKAGES.

NOS. 76 AND 78 VARICK STREET. One Door From Canal street, NEW YORK.


SMOKE EL SOLERO CIGAR

5c.

FOR SALE AT THE STAND.

MADE BY FRANK LAUER, MANUFACTURER OF FINE CIGARS 814 WALNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

 

CARMAN & HOUSE, LIVERY AND FEED

. . CONTRACTS FOR ALL SHOWS . .

Country and Town Teams, always the Best, and Furnished on Time.

COLUMBUS, IND.


THE FIRST MAN TO SEE AT COLUMBUS, INDIANA, IS WALTER DOUP LICENSED BILL POSTER AND DISTRIBUTER.

The Hotel St. Denis,

Columbus, Ind.


A. GOEKE & SONS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS

Wholesale Dealers in Flour, Grain, Feed, Provisions and Produce

1201 and 1203 MAIN STREET, EVANSVILLE, IND.

 

E.T. HEVERIN. C.T. HEVERIN. E. T. HEVERIN & BRO.

COMMERICAL AND Theatrical Advertisers

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CONTRACTORS FOR The Southern States

LICENCED CITY BILL POSTERS

LOUISVILLE, KY.

 

St. Louis Bill Posting Co.

AN UP-TO-DATE SERVICE

CONDUCTED ON UP-TO-DATE PRINCIPLES.

A Perfect System Covering all Thoroughfares and Every Street Car Line.

Address all correspondence to ST. LOUIS BILL POSTING CO., 516 WALNUT STREET, R. J. GUNNING, Pres. ST. LOUIS, MO., U.S.A.

 

JOHN G. SIMON, Prest. CHAS. G. SIMON, Secy. GREAT WESTERN FEED CO.

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Hay, Grain and Mill Feed MAIN OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE,

SUPPLIED Buffalo Bill's Wild West AND Ringling Bros. Shows.

TELEPHONE 7769.

818 and 820 Manchester Road, ST. LOUIS, MO.

 

HUIEST-STOUT Sign Co.

INCORPORATED AND LICENSED. City Bill Posters, Sign Advertisers

ST. LOUIS, MO. EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL.


F. L. DEVER. W. E. HULL. PEORIA LIVERY CO.

Bus, Baggage and Carriage Line

Finest Line of Light Livery and Carriages in the City

Contracts taken for Feed, Etc., for Shows.

TELEPHONE 267. 517-519 FULTON ST. PEORIA, ILL.


H. McFADDEN & BRO.

DEALERS IN GROCERIES, FLOUR AND FEED

Hay and Straw. Grain by the Carload. Show Orders a Specialty.

Nos. 9-11 NEIL ST., ODD FELLOWS' BUILDING, CHAMPAIGN, ILL.

 

Chicago, Ill.

MONDAY, June 1. In giving parade this morning all men and horses were shipped down town by the Illinois Central R. R. Band wagons left the building at 5 A. M. in order to meet them in town. Parade returned at 12.15 P. M. Cowboy John Franz, who had his arm broken in Clarkesburg, commenced riding to-day. Hadj Sherriff, Arab Dervish Dancer, joined to-day. Lew Hawkins, negro minstrel, joined the Annex here. Among the prominent people who attended opening day were Mayor Swift, Wm F. Harrity, Chairman of the National Democratic Committee, James A. Bailey, Proprietor Barnum & Bailey Shows, Louis E. Cooke, Gen. Agent of the Barnum & Bailey Shows, Peter Sells, of the Forepaugh-Sells Show, W. H. Gardner, General Agent, and Si Semon, Contracting Agent of the Buffalo Bill's Wild West, and Dr. E. D. Colvin, of Chicago. Chas. Trego, foreman of the Bronco stables, left to-day for Coatsville, Pa., on a visit home.

Attendance, afternoon 2,403. Evening 3,922.

Weather clear.

TUESDAY, June 2. Weather cool and cloudy; commenced to rain at 7 P. M. and rained all night. E. Redmond and James Clark, back-wall canvas- men, got to fighting with the janitor and both were arrested this morning and sent to the Bridewell for 113 days. The Prentices, who were with the Annex last season, visited us to-day. John Ringling, Secretary of the Ringling Bros. Show, Eddie Arlington and Mr. Holland, Gen. Agent of the Lemon Bros. Show, were guests of the show to-day. Sam Haller, our old head-usher of '93 and '94, came in to-day and shook hands with all his old-time friends.

Attendance, afternoon 2,459, evening 3,722.

WEDNESDAY, June 3. Weather fair. Morris Kern, who was called to New York by the death of his father, returned to-day and resumed his duties. Cowboy Chas. Higley joined us to-day for the first time since the World's Fair season. Lewis Barrett, Secretary of the Forepaugh-Sells Show, Peter Sells and Dr. E. D. Colvin, were guests of the show again to-day. Salem Nasser, Arabian strong man, was taken to the hospital to-day sick with typhoid fever. Ticket seller Ed. Showles went through the surgical operation of having his palates cut yesterday, and his senatorial voice was not heard all day. The silence was painful to us, who were used to it. He managed to work by pantomime, with some degree of success.

Attendance, afternoon 2,375, evening 4,653.

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C. R. HUTCHINSON.

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M. B. BAILEY.

 

THURSDAY, June 4. Weather fine. Superintendent of our canvas, Thomas Fay, left to-day for a few days' visit home at St. Charles, Minn. Henry H. Cross, an old-time manager and animal trainer, Charles and John Ringling were guests of the show to-day. We had opposition to-day on a small scale by an Uncle Tom's Cabin Co., located two blocks from us, with ten-cent show; it, however, seemed to do us no damage.

Attendence, afternoon 2,312, evening 6,271.

FRIDAY, June 5. Weather fine. Kerry Meager, contracting agent of the Ringling Bros., and Wm. Harvell, an old-time circus treasurer, were guests to-day. John Tippets went to the hospital sick to-day.

Attendance, 2,578 in the afternoon, 4,103 in the evening.

SATURDAY, June 6. Weather fine. Louis Barrett and Peter Sells, of the Forepaugh-Sells Show and John Ringling, of the Ringling Bros. Show, were guests again to-night. Our first week in Chicago was a success in every particular, and people seemed pleased with the performance under cover.

Attendance, afternoon 6,996, evening 10,559.

SUNDAY, June 7. Very warm in the morning, but at 3.30 a heavy storm, accompanied with a fierce wind, came up and lasted for an hour. It was the nearest thing to a cyclone that we have had this season, but we suffered no loss. We had a turn-away in the afternoon, but managed to take care of the people at night. James E. Taylor, groom in the bronco tent, was taking a horse into the building during the storm when a door blew shut and caught him; his right hand was broken and he received several severe bruises on the right leg. Brock Connor, third assistant on canvas, closed to-day.

Attendance, in the afternoon 11,064, evening 5,127.

MONDAY, June 8. Weather cold and rainy. To-night there was a new act put on for the first time, entitled, "A Horse Fair." All of our draft horses were taken out after the Arabs had completed their act. The horses were marched around the arena in pairs and the act took well with the public, the horses behaving very well. Cowboy Bob Wilkinson closed to-day on account of lameness. Fred Hawley and wife of the Annex also closed to-day. Nate Salsbury left to-day for New York City.

Attendance, afternoon 2,794, evening 5,109.

 

TUESDAY, June 9. Cold northwest wind all day accompanied with fine rain at night.

Attendance, afternoon 3,592, evening 7,108.

WEDNESDAY, June 10. Weather fine. Fursman smiled to-day for the first time since our engagement here, as the result of a turn-away from the big show. A few people strayed in to see him.

Attendance, afternoon 5,219, evening, 10,976.

THURSDAY, June 11. Weather fine. Gen. Welsey Merritt and staff visited the show this afternoon. Chas Higley, Cowboy, was thrown from his horse this afternoon. Salem Nasser, Arabian strong man, who went to Mercy Hospital one week ago with typhoid fever, died at 12 o'clock last night. He was twenty-seven years of age, born in Sheuerrie, Asia, where he leaves a wife and two children. He joined the Buffalo Bill Wild West Company in Brooklyn, N. Y., season of '94 and again in '96. This is the first time death has visited our camp this season, and of the whole number of employees the best specimen of physical manhood was taken. He was respected by all who knew him and expressions of regret were heard around the camp all day.

Attendance, afternoon 5,307, evening 11,419.

FRIDAY, June 12. Weather bad, cold northwest wind accompanied with fine rain. Thomas Fay,

Superintendent of Canvas, returned this morning from St. Charles, Minn., where he has been on a week's visit home. U.S. Senator W. V. Allen, of Nebraska, was a guest of the show this evening.

Attendance, afternoon 3,889, evening 8,547.

SATURDAY, June 13. Weather fine. Salem Nasser was buried this morning at 10 A. M. in St. Mary's Cemetery. All performers attended the funeral in uniform. Chas. Higley was thrown in the bucking-horse act this afternoon and had to be carried out of the arena. He sustained no injury except a bad shaking up. Cowboy Ed. Hughes laid up with an attack of pneumonia. To-night makes our one-hundredth performance this season without missing a show, a railroad accident or a blow-down. This is remarkable, when it is taken into consideration the number of storms that has visited the country this spring. The strong-box of our treasury might contain fewer shekels to-day were it not for the coolness and quiet wits of a brave woman. This woman, whose name is Mrs. John Kenon, prevented a daring hold up on the ticket offices to-night, making it possible for the police to capture the plotters. The hold-up of the Deadwood Stage Coach was nothing to the projected robbery of to-night. At nine o'clock to-night, Mrs. Kenon, who lives at 6345 Washington   avenue, was standing on the rear porch of her house, when she noticed two men walking up the alley. One of them seemed to be trying to persuade his companion, who was a tough-looking individual, to commit some kind of a daring deed. The actions of the men interested Mrs. Kenon, and she remained hidden behind some vines and listened to the conversation.

"Now when you get the money shove it into the bag and I will cover you with the gun," said the smaller man. "Then you run down this alley to Sixty-fourth street, where it will be dead easy for you to get out of the way in the dark. As soon as they start to count the money at the east window you go to the other end of the building and you 'fire' and then come back again, when I will make the ticket agent throw up his hands, when we will both get out of the way, and I will meet you later at Sixty-first street and Stony Island avenue."

Mrs. Kenon had heard enough to convince her that the two men were planning an attack on our receipts. She ran hastily to the Woodlawn Station, where she told Matron Rice what she had overheard. Lieut. Musser was informed of the facts and, hastily calling several officers, he surrounded the entrances to the alley, and then closed in on the two plotters. At the station the men gave their names as Lynch and Thomas Cooley. Lynch claims that Cooley planned the hold-up and provided the revolvers. Capt. Shippy thinks Lynch is wanted by the Newark police.

Attendance, afternoon 10,386, evening 11,706.

SUNDAY, June 14. Weather fine. Charles Herbert, Col. Cody's private coachman, left us to-day. William Dunbar, Superintendent of the Annex canvas, and all of his men quit to-night. Lew Hawkins, of the Annex, also quit to-night. In our move to-night one of our buffaloes got away and created a great deal of excitement on Sixty-third street. He had to be lassoed and led to the train. Our family relations broke up completely to-day; Mrs. Col. W. F. Cody and daughter Irma left for North Platte, Neb.; Mrs. Jule Keene and Mrs. Sweeney left for Aetna, Ill.; Mrs. J. T. McCaddon and Mrs. Hutchinson left for Philadelphia; Mrs. William McCune left for Omaha, Neb.; Mrs. M. B. Bailey returned to her home in Evanston, Ill.; Mrs. Harry Gray left for New York City. We closed a very successful two weeks engagement at the Coliseum building. Dimensions of buildings 300 x 750; arena, 157 x 418; number of chairs in building, 12,049.

Attendance, afternoon 8,875, evening 4,981.

Total attendance first seven days 68,550

Total attendance second seven days 100,406

Grand Total 168,956

 

Kankakee, Ill.

MONDAY, June 15. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. One mile haul to the lot. Thomas McAvoy was to-day appointed third assistant superintendent of canvas in the place of Brock Connor. Kershaw and Cloud, also Shafer and Clark, joined the Annex to-day. Over 300 patients from the Northern Hospital for the Insane attended the afternoon performance. John Curley, foreman of the stake-and-chain wagon, went to the car sick. Three cook-house employees were arrested to-night on suspicion and were let go after they were held up for all the money they had.

Business afternoon big, evening fair.

Lot, City Park.

Arena, 174 x 336.

Ottawa, Ill.

TUESDAY, June 16. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. Three-fourths mile haul to the lot. Assistant seat man Walker closed to-day. James Murphy was to-day appointed private coachman for Col. W. F. Cody. Dick Thompson was appointed superintendent of the Annex canvas in place of William Dunbar, who resigned in Chicago.

Business afternoon immense, evening good.

Weather warm and sultry.

Lot, East Main street and Illinois River.

Arena, 175 x 350.

Rock Island, Ill.

WEDNESDAY, June 17. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. One mile haul to the lot. Every blue seat we had was put up to-day. The Punocle Club was organized to-day among the Cowboys. The organization is to do missionary work among their own people. No member of the club is to shave for six weeks, and the use of soap is to be dispensed with under the penalty of $1.00 fine and "shapped" by the members of the club. Ed. Hughes, President; John Franz, Secretary.

Weather very warm.

Business big at both performances.

Lot corner Twelfth street and Ninth avenue.

Arena, 221 x 447.

Galesburg, Ill.

THURSDAY, June 18. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. One-half mile haul to the lot. Cowboy Ed. Hughes, who was left in Chicago sick, joined us   to-day. Indian Eagle Bull returned to Pine Ridge Agency to-day on account of sickness.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Ball Park.

Arena, 179 x 349.

Burlington, Iowa.

FRIDAY, June 19. Arrived in town at 3.30 A. M. Two mile haul to the lot and all up-hill. Manager Nate Salsbury gave us a call to-night. He came at 7 P. M. and went away at 11.10 to Montana. John Parker was to-day appointed superintendent of Annex canvas, Richard Thompson resigning. We had opposition to-day, in the form of Rennold Bros.' United Show, only one block away. Ticket-seller John Tippets came on from Chicago, where he was left sick, but being in no condition to remain with the show he went back again to remain until he recovered entirely.

Business big at both performances.

Lot corner Foster and Starr avenue.

Arena, 171 x 354.

Quincy, Ill.

SATURDAY, June 20. Arrived in town at 6.15 A. M. Long haul to lot—three and one-half miles.

Bad hill coming off the runs and getting on the lot. All teams were doubled up and the last wagon reached the lot at 12.15 P. M. Thirty-five lengths of blue seats were put up in sixteen minutes. Parade did not get out until 12 noon, and only one band wagon was taken out. Cook-house wagon No. 2 got away from six-horse driver Wm. Cousins when going down to the runs and smashed one wheel and one horse lamed, but no other damage was done. It was 3 A. M. before the last wagon was loaded. This has been a tough day on stock.

Weather very warm and sultry.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Baldwin's Park, Thirty-fifth and Main sts.

Arena, 173 x 311.

Springfield, Ill.

SUNDAY, June 21. Arrived in town at 8.30 A. M. This is the best run we have had this season to date—113 miles in five hours. We had a half mile haul to lot. Our canvas was all put up in the morning; seats were left until evening. This is the first Sunday rest we have had in four weeks, and we all enjoyed it. Weather very warm.

MONDAY, June 22. Weather very warm and sultry. Heavy rain at 10.15 P. M. as we were taking   down. Louis McKowen was to-day appointed foreman of bronco stables. with S. Elliot as assistant, in place of Chas. Trego, resigned. Mrs Jule Keen and Mrs. Wm. Sweeney came from Aetna, Ill., to spend Sunday with their husbands.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, 5th and South Grand avenue.

Arena, 174 x 442.

Danville, Ill.

TUESDAY, June 23. Arrived in town at 6.45 A. M. Three-fourths of a mile haul to lot. Mrs. Jule Keen and Mrs. Wm. Sweeney left to-day for Evansville. Ind. Burt Sorden, photograph seller, closed to-day and left for Chicago. This has been a miserable day; it rained all the forenoon and again at night.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, Jackson and Woodbury streets.

Arena, 175 x 352.

Terre Haute, Ind.

WEDNESDAY, June 24. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. Two mile haul to lot. Weather fine. Four-horse driver, Frank Wilson, was hit with a stone to-night while making a trip to the runs; he received an ugly cut over the left eye Russell Harrison and family, son of Ex-President Harrison, was a guest of the show to-night. The famous trotting horse, "Abraham Lincoln," joined in the parade to-day. Our buffalo bull got away twice to-night, and started on a rampage through the streets; he was finally lassoed and taken to the train all right.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, corner 18th and Orchard streets.

Arena, 174 x 351.

Crawfordsville, Ind.

THURSDAY, June 25. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. One mile haul to lot. Weather very warm all day. At 6 P. M. a heavy electric storm came up and lasted until 10 P. M. It hurt our night business, but still it was big considering the storm. Mr. Gentry, of the Gentry Dog Show, called on us this morning. Col. Cody had our buffalo bull sent home to North Platte to-night. His conduct was so bad that it was impossible for us to put up with it longer.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, Lane avenue and Bluff street.

Arena, 174 x 354.

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W. O. SNYDER.

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JULE KEEN.

 

La Fayette, Ind.

FRIDAY, June 26. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. Half-mile haul to lot. It was a hilly and rough road. Cook-house wagon broke a wheel on the way to the lot. Wm. Welton, superintendent of baggage, was taken severely ill at the runs this morning. He was taken back to the car, where he remained the rest of the day.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, 16th street and Central Avenue.

Arena, 184 x 354.

Logansport, Ind.

SATURDAY, June 27. Arrived in town at 4.15 A. M. Half-mile haul to lot, which we found in a very bad state, very hilly and small, but we managed to get up in a creditably good condition. Abdallah Ali, one of the Ali Brothers, Arabian acrobats, fell to-day while doing their pyramid act. His left arm was badly sprained and right leg hurt.

Weather fine.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, corner Wilkinson and Wheatland streets.

Arena, 176 x 349.

Ft. Wayne, Ind.

SUNDAY, June 28. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. Three-fourths mile haul to lot, which we found small and in bad condition. It is a typical city day. Cook-house and blacksmith shop had to go on another lot. Horse tents and dressing-room much crowded. All canvas was put up early in the morning. In the afternoon there was a match game of baseball between the Candy Butchers and Cooks. Betting was lively, and in favor of the Candy Butchers, who came out ahead by a score of 16 to 11.

Weather today warm and clear.

MONDAY, June 29. James A. Bailey, proprietor of Barnum & Bailey Show, came on this morning and paid us a visit while on his way to the Sells-Forepaugh Show. Mrs. John Burke, wife of Colorado Jack, paid the camp a visit this morning   while on her way to Denver, Col. Uncle Jimmie Hutch, probably the oldest side-show man in the business, and who has just left the Robinson-Franklin Show, was a welcome guest to-day. J. A. Bailey and J. T. McCaddon, left for Chicago at 3 P. M. George Harrison commenced work on Ramsey's candy stand force to-day. We had ideal weather to-day, accompanied with ideal business.

Lot, Calhoun street and St. Mary's River, known as the Jail Lot.

Arena, 178 x 403.

Plymouth, Ind.

TUESDAY, June 30. Arrived in town at 6.30 A.M. We were delayed in unloading for half an hour on account of switching. The town was small and dead, not even a street car.

Weather warm and clear.

Business in the afternoon big; in the evening light.

Lot on Madison street, known as the Simonds Field.

Arena, 178 x 347.

 

American Advertising and Bill Posting Company

Chicago, Ill.

"DIN'NA YE HEAR THE SLOGAN?"

The BIGGEST and BEST BILL POSTING PLANT IN THE WORLD.

CHICAGO—Proper. South Chicago Oak Park Pullman Rogers Park Englewood Evanston Kensington Harlem

TERRITORY COVERED 200 Square Miles.

CAPACITY 100,000 Sheets on Our Own Boards.

ALL STREET CAR LINE AND BOULEVARD DRIVE SHOWINGS

Estimates Given on all kinds of Printing.

280 Madison St. Phone 1538, Main.

R. C. CAMPBELL, Manager. Cable Address: "Bill Post." Col. BURR ROBBINS. Treasurer.

ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO THE COMPANY.

 

ESTABLISHED 1873. INCORPORATED 1893. Buy Your Feed from J. J. BADENOCH CO. COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND GRAIN SHIPPERS

CHOICE HAY, GRAIN AND MILL FEED.

44 AND 46 S. DESPLAINES ST., NEAR WASHINGTON STREET, TELEPHONE, MAIN 4380. CHICAGO.

 

CONTINENTAL HOTEL

COR. WABASH AVE. AND MADSION ST. CHICAGO

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STEAM Heat. Passenger Elevator. Decorated, renovated and refurnished. In the heart of amusement and business center.

AMERICAN PLAN, $2.00 AND $2.50 PER DAY. EUROPEAN PLAN, 75c and $1.00. Special rates to the Profession.

CHAS. O. BLOOM, PROP.


ED. SHUMAKER, ARCADE BILL POSTER

CONTROLS ALL BILL BOARDS IN THE CITY.

KANKAKEE, ILL.


FENOUILLE'S LIVERY BOARDING AND FEED STABLE.

Country Routes Promptly Attended To L. E. FENOUILLE, PROPRIETOR.

TELEPHONE NO. 127. 197 STATION STREET, KANKAKEE, ILL.

 

W. A. JEFFERY, CONTRACTOR and BILL-BOARD BUILDER

Also all kinds of Lithograph Boards.

325 Madison St., OTTAWA, ILL.

Refers by permission to Buffalo Bill's Wild West.


S. B. BRADFORD, Dealer in Flour, Feed, Grain and Hay

COR. MAIN AND CLINTON STS. Telephone 115. OTTAWA, ILL.

Prompt delivery and satisfaction guaranteed in supplying show contracts.


JAMES B. BAILEY, BEST LIVERY IN THE COUNTY.

Furnishes all the Country Teams for the Big Tent Shows. First-class service. Prices reasonable.

113 JEFFERSON ST. OTTAWA, ILL. PHONE 131.

Refers by permission to Buffalo Bill's Wild West.


TRI-CITY BILL POSTING CO.

Rock Island, Ill. Controlling all Bill Boards in Rock Island.

BILL POSTING, DISTRIBUTING, CARD TACKING AND SIGN PAINTING

Promptly attended to.

STEVE F. MILLER, . . . . . Contractor.

  [image]

BROWN'S HOTEL, . . GALESBURG, ILL.

NORMAN ANTHONY, PROPRIETOR


J. W. HAMMOND. J. C. GEER. HAMMOND AND GEER, DEALERS IN GROCERIES FLOUR AND FEED

TELEPHONE 57 No. 121 MAIN STREET, GALESBURG, ILL.

 

James O'Connor Livery,

Feed and Sale Stable

COR. SIMMONS AND CHERRY STS.,

GALESBURG, ILL.


GEO. W. STONE, JOBBER

FLOUR, HAY, FEED, OATS, CORN, BRAN, ETC.

VEGETABLES AND FRUIT.

211 WATER STREET, Burlington, Iowa


H. E. HUNT IS THE OLDEST BILL POSTER IN IOWA

OWNS THE BEST BILL BOARDS IN BURLINGTON

CONTROLS THE BEST SHOW GROUNDS IN THE STATE.

Call on him, he will Take Good Care of You

627 SOUTH MAIN STREET, Burlington, Iowa.

 

THE E. BOWMAN Bill Posting and Distributing Company

G. B. BOWMAN, Manager.

Office, EMPIRE THEATRE, QUINCY, ILL.


HENRY WISKIRCHEN, Livery AND BOARDING STABLE.

COUNTRY ROUTES A SPECIALTY. First-Class Teams.

HAMPSHIRE STREET, Bet. Third and Fourth. QUINCY, ILL.

 

JOHN FOSTER, Fine Livery Boarding and Carriage Stables

Carriages Kept Hitched to Attend Calls. Country Routes Promptly Attended To.

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.

We always furnish Barnum & Bailey, and Buffalo Bill's Wild West Shows.

110-114 SOUTH SEVENTH ST., Telephone No. 5. Springfield, Ill.


Hotel Palace

D. J. BLOCK, PROP.

Cor. Fourth and Washington Sts.

CENTRALLY LOCATED. STEAM HEAT. ELEVATOR SERVICE. LIGHTED BY ELECTRICITY.

Special Rates to Professionals.

Rates, $2 per Day.

SPRINGFIELD, ILL.


W. J. HORN The City Bill Poster and Display Advertiser

SAMPLING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, ETC.

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

TELEPHONE 214. RYAN'S DRUG STORE.

Office, 6th and Washington Sts., SPRINGFIELD, ILL.

 

KEEFE & SON, DEALERS IN FLOUR, FEED, BRAN SHIP-STUFF AND ROCK SALT.

WE FURNSH THE BUFFALO BILL SHOWS WITH GRAIN AND FEED

Cor. Fourth and Jefferson Streets, SPRINGFIELD, ILL.


SNAPP & FORBES LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLES

Have Handled all the Tent Shows in Past 10 Years.

No. 17 NORTH WALNUT STREET, DANVILLE, ILL.


FRANK P. MYERS, City Bill Poster AND DISTRIBUTER.

REFERENCES: Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Barnum and Bailey. Sells Bros. & Forepaugh. First National Bank, Danville.

DANVILLE, ILL.

 

GEO. W. MODESITT, Liveryman

Only Barn in the City fully equipped to furnish Country Teams for Tent Shows.

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST.

207-209 S. THIRD STREET, TELEPHONE 365. Terre Haute, Ind.


J. M. DISHON, Bill Poster

TERRE HAUTE, IND. HAS A POPULATION OF 43,000

IT IS THE BEST CITY IN THE STATE

Has the Finest Line of Bill Boards of any City in America of its Size.

IT WILL PAY YOU

Better to have your Bills Posted in TERRE HAUTE than in any City in the land.

J. M. DISHON AND NO OTHER GOES FORTH IN HASTE, WITH BILLS AND PASTE AND PROCLAIMS TO ALL CREATION, MEN ARE WISE WHO ADVERTISE IN THE PRESENT GENERATION.

 

J. W. DYE, DEALER IN Hay, Grain And all Kinds of Feed

Prompt Attention to Supplying Shows

21 WALNUT STREET, DANVILLE, ILL.


New Aveline, FORT WAYNE, IND. The Ramsey

W. D. JONES & SON.

Crawfordsville, Ind.


J. J. INSLEY. E. L. MORSE. INSLEY & MORSE, LIVERY, FEED, BOARDING AND SALE

STABLES

FIRST-CLASS TEAMS AND THOROUGH COUNTRY ROUTES.

212-216 EAST MARKET STREET, Crawfordsville, Ind.

 

ALBERT S. MILLER, Bill Poster AND DISTRIBUTER

CONTROLS ALL BILL BOARDS.

OFFICE: 116 N. Washington St., Crawfordsville, Ind.


T. C. MARTIN & CO. DEALERS IN Flour, Meal, Feed HAY AND STRAW.

Cor. Tenth and Main Sts. LA FAYETTE, IND.


JAMES H. ISLEY, CITY BILL POSTER

OFFICE SEEGER'S STABLE. GRAND OPERA HOUSE.

LA FAYETTE, IND.


Seeger's Transfer and Livery Co.

George Seeger, President. George Seeger, Jr Sec.-Treas.

60, 62, 72, and 74 SOUTH FOURTH ST., LaFayette, Ind.

Branch Office, LAHR HOUSE.

Stable Telephone, 102

 

CHAS. E. SCHLEIGER, City Bill Poster

DISTRIBUTER AND GENERAL ADVERTISER.

Controls all the Bill Boards in Logansport.

215 SIXTH STREET, Logansport, Ind.


I. N. CASH, LIVERY FEED AND SALE.

Furnish all Shows with Best CountryTeams

209 MARKET STREET, LOGANSPORT, IND.

 

W. D. HENDERSON, DEALER IN Hay, Corn, Oats, Bran,

CHOPPED FEED, SHORTS, STRAW, Etc. SUPPLIES ALL SHOWS

67-69 E. COLUMBIA STREET, Telephone 144. Fort Wayne, Ind.


J. F. FLETCHER, Livery Feed and Sale Stable

FURNISH FIRST-CLASS TEAMS FOR COUNTRY ROUTES.

32 Barr Street, FORT WAYNE, Ind.


Fort Wayne City Bill Posting Co.

Members . . ASSOCIATED AND INTER-STATE BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION

C. B. WOODWORTH, . . . . Manager. CHRIST BRANDT, . . Superintendent.

FORT WAYNE, IND.

 

Livery, Feed, Sale and Boarding STABLE.

L. H. VANSCOIK, PROP.

Good Rigs at all hours. Commercial men will find this a good place to procure rigs. Turn-outs strictly first-class. Careful drivers furnished when necessary.

EAST LAPORTE STREET, PLYMOUTH, IND.


W. M. KENDALL, Dealer in HAY, GRAIN AND FEED

A Full Line of Groceries and Provisions.

PLYMOUTH, IND.


I. E. LOWER, Bill Poster and Distributer

CONTROLS ALL BOARDS.

500 feet recently erected for the BUFFALO BILL WILD WEST SHOW. Centrally located.

PLYMOUTH, IND.


[image]

BUFFALO BILL TO THE RESCUE.

 

A. K. WILSON Livery and Sale Stable

BEST TURN-OUTS IN THE CITY.

Best Country Routes of any Livery in the Country, and Furnishes all the Tent Shows with Country Teams

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST.

8, 10 and 12 E. MULBERRY ST. KOKOMO, IND.


[image]

The SCOUT BUFFALO BILL

Hon. W. F. CODY

 

Kokomo, Ind.

WEDNESDAY, July 1. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. Half-mile haul to lot, which we found in fair condition, but crooked and hard to lay out. Indian White Bull went home to the Pine Ridge Agency to-night sick. Cowboys William and Kid Gabrill closed to-day, and left for Chicago. Candy butcher A.N. Horton closed to-night.

Weather fine.

Business good both performances.

Lot, Lafountain and Market streets.

Arena, 178 x 352.

Bluffton, Ind.

THURSDAY, July 2. Arrived in town at 3.20 A. M. Half-mile haul to lot. J. T. McCaddon returned this morning from Chicago. S. C. Eding and family were the guests of our own Annie Oakley to-day. Harvey Roat, of Ramsey's force, left to-day. We had a heavy thunder-shower at 3 P. M. to-day, which lasted half an hour.

Weather warm and sultry.

Business in the afternoon immense, in the evening fair.

Lot, North Main street.

Arena, 177 x 343.

Marion, Ind.

FRIDAY, July 3. Arrived in town at 4 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot. We had quite a character in camp to-day in the person of Mrs. A. Ryan Maxey, who was on horseback. She is known in different States by different nicknames. In Kansas it is "Little Blue"; in Missouri as "The Woman in Blue"; in Indiana as "True Blue." She is something of a writer and a poet. Her make-up was certainly original, and I do not believe that any of us ever saw anything like it before. As is usual with such characters, she claimed close acquaintance with Col. Wm. F. Cody. The weather was the warmest we have experienced this season. At 2 P. M. it was 102 degrees in the shade. A heavy thunder-storm came up at 8 P. M. and rained hard until 10.30. We received a good soaking taking down the canvas.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, Third street, known as Sweetzer's Grove.

Arena, 177 x 351.

Piqua, Ohio.

SATURDAY, July 4. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. Had one-half mile haul to lot, which we found to be in very bad condition, which was caused by the   recent rains. Consequently all teams were doubled in going on the lot. Our own Annie Oakley was happy to-day; her mother, brother, three sisters and their six children were at the show to-day. It was the first time they had ever seen the show and they drove thirty miles to get here. Every one joined with Annie in trying to make things pleasant for them. We all did a little patriotic decorating to-day. It was especially noticeable in the dining tent; every table was covered with flags and bunting, every plate bore a flag of our great nation except one, who, not being a native, and not having taken out his naturalization papers was not entitled to it, but nevertheless Brogan is a good fellow. Three rousing cheers were given for the Colonel at the proposal of George Burch, Chief of Cowboys. The Colonel replied with a nice little speech, which contained many good wishes and much good advice. Harry Speigle, the venerable ticket-taker at the side-show door, received an ovation as he came into the dining tent to-day, this being his sixty-seventh birthday and his forty-second year in the show business. Every one wished him a continuance of good health and prosperity. Harry replied by a neat little speech, which was heartily cheered by the entire company. Taking all in all to-day was a great Fourth. The street-car system gave out this evening and the patrons of the night show had to walk home. Weather very warm throughout the whole day; a heavy rain-storm at 7 P. M., which continued all the evening.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening fair.

Lot, Driving Park.

Arena, 176 x 345.

Dayton, Ohio.

SUNDAY, July 5. Arrived in town at 3.30 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot. Everything was put up in the morning. J. T. McCaddon, Jule Keen, Fred and Charles Hutchinson, and Orator J. J. McCarthy went to Cincinnati and paid a visit to the Pawnee Bill Wild West Show. They were entertained by Pawnee Bill, May Lillie, and Chief of Cowboys Heck Quinn, who is an old Wild West man. Annie Oakley remained over in Piqua last evening and joined us again to-day. James P. Anderson was seen sitting in the marque to-day for several hours figuring faithfully: he left the ground covered with paper and one piece was picked up containing the following figures: 4 days 96 hours, 5,760 minutes, 345,600 seconds. It was passed around the camp all day and no one solved the problem until it came to Mrs. George Fursman, of the Annex; to her, she said, it was as plain as day, and that Mr. Anderson was going home to   [image] Courier Co. DRIVERS FOR J. A. BAILEY.   Columbus, Ohio, next Friday, to see his wife. She was correct, for he left on Friday for Columbus. Heavy rain at 2 P. M. which lasted until 4 P. M. Orders were issued to-day that no employee would be allowed to ride on wagons either to or from lots.

MONDAY, July 6. Weather very warm and sultry with heavy clouds all day, which at night brought us our usual thunder-storm. G. L. Burch, Chief of the Cowboys, and Cowboy Walter Scott were thrown from their horses to-day during the bucking-horse act. Jake Platt, first assistant superintendent of canvas, was presented with a lovely coffee-cup at the staff table. It bore the beautiful inscription of "Grandpa" on the side; it was from the waiter of that table.

Business at both performances fair.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 182 x 368.

Springfield, Ohio.

TUESDAY, July 7. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot. If ever Anderson prayed for still weather he did to-day. We could not get a stake down over twelve inches anywhere and the least wind would have blown us down, but with our usual good luck we came out all right. Refreigo Carrello, a Mexican, was thrown in the grand entree to-day; his left shoulder was badly hurt and sprained and he received a lot of small bruises and was badly used up. Master-Mechanic Dan Taylor left to-day for Columbus, Ohio, to get the grounds ready for our next Monday's engagement.

Business at both performances good.

Lot, Columbus and Isabell streets.

Arena, 182 x 368.

Kenton, Ohio.

WEDNESDAY, July 8. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. Three-quarters mile haul to lot, which we found to be large and roomy and in good condition. R. F. Watson, an American soldier, had a saber run through his left ear during the military drill. While Engineer C. H. Crowell was down-town this morning he was arrested on suspicion of being connected with a $900.00 robbery; he was taken to headquarters, searched and let go. Reserve seats were sold to-day for 25 cents each for the first time this season. William Sloan, second cook, closed to-day.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening fair.

Lot, Liston and Fountain streets.

Arena, 179 x 366.

 

Lima, Ohio.

THURSDAY, July 9. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot, which was in bad condition owing to the recent heavy rains. We arrived in one of the worst rains since the "flood," and it kept up all day. We managed to wade through with the afternoon performance, and at 4 P. M. orders came to tear down, that no night show would be given. It showed good judgment upon the part of the management, for the last wagon never left the lot until 12:30 A. M. The cook-house wagon broke a wheel, which delayed things several hours. Altogether, it was the worst rain and the worst lot we have had so far this season.

Business, in spite of the rain, was immense at the one performance we gave.

Lot, Cole and Shawnee road.

Arena, 176 x 360.

We struck this town in a fearful storm,
  There was rain and wind and sleet;
We had a two-mile haul to the lot,
  And the mud was two feet deep.

We gave one show in the afternoon,
  Every one was nearly drowned;
At four P. M. orders came
  "Pack up and take her down."

Things look tough when "Bill" lies down,
  You can bet they are looking dark;
For he will give a show in any place
  Where Noah could sail his ark.

Marion, Ohio.

FRIDAY, July 10. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One-mile haul to lot, which we found in good condition considering the recent rains. I do not believe it is possible for any show outfit to look worse than we did this morning. Our clothes, usually like "Jacob's coat of many colors," were not so now; wagons, canvas, horses, clothes, etc., all looked alike, the color of Lima mud. No show was ever donated more real estate by one town than we had donated to us at Lima. The cook-house wagon, the same one that broke a wheel last night, broke down again this morning. Vicente P. Orapeza, Chief of the Mexicans, was laid up sick in the cars all day as a result of yesterday's wet weather. J. P. Anderson left at 2 P. M. to day for Columbus, Ohio, in order to have a few days' visit at home. George Brudell, who had charge of the range wagon, with the cook-house, left to-day for Cleveland sick. The 75 cent reserve seat sale was tried to-day. Two lengths of reserves were put up   [image] THE ANNEX.   on each side, but it did not seem to take very well and was abandoned the next day.

Business at both performances good.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 178 x 360.

Mansfield, Ohio.

SATURDAY, July 11. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One-mile haul to lot, which we found to be in good condition, large and roomy. Manager J. T. McCaddon issued orders that all wagons were to be washed this morning so we could go into Columbus looking a little decent; it kept all hands busy most of the day. Cowboy Will Smith received a bad fall to-day but fortunately received no serious injury.

Business at both performances big.

Lot, East Fourth street.

Arena, 181 x 365.

Columbus, Ohio.

SUNDAY, July 12. Arrived in town at 8 A. M.; one and a half-mile haul to lot. We put up everything we had to-day in the shape of canvas and seats. United States Sergeant Clary and his men were kept busy entertaining United States Regular troops from the barracks that are located here.

There was a match game of baseball in the arena this afternoon between the candy butchers and the dressing-room force, the candy butchers winning by a score of 10 to 2. Cal. Towers, of the Annex, closed to-day and joined the Robinson-Franklin Shows.

Weather warm, heavy thunder-storm at 2 P. M.

MONDAY, July 13. This is the home of our superintendent, James P. Anderson, for thirty-five years, consequently he was kept busy entertaining old friends all day. Joe Clancy, clog dancer of the Annex, closed to-day on account of illness, and left in the evening for New York. Harry Coulter, an American soldier, accepted a position in New York City to-day and left for that city. Indian Full Stomach went home to Pine Ridge Agency sick.

Business in the afternoon big, immense at night.

Weather very warm all day, and as usual we took down in the rain, it commencing to come down about 10.15 P.M.

Lot, Mt. Vernon and Monroe streets.

Arena, 224 x 465.

Newark, Ohio.

TUESDAY, July14. Arrived in town 4 A. M. Three-quarter mile haul to lot. A Newark paper   of this evening, in commenting upon the parade, said "that the Show had two steam caliopes, but they could not play either one of them, but that the people appreciated them just the same." Kinura, the Japanese magician of the Annex, closed to-day on account of ill health and left for New York. This is the French Fourth of July, and the French soldiers did all they could in a small way to celebrate. Just as the audience was dismissed this evening we had the hardest rain of the season. It was more severe than any of us had ever witnessed—old showmen having never seen its equal. It put out a beacon-light, and, as is quite a common case, the electric street railway was disabled just as the people desired to get home. All our teams had to be doubled in order to get our stuff all off of the lot, and the last wagon did not leave until 12:30.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening light.

Lot, 11th and Church streets.

Arena, 181 x 386.

Zanesville, Ohio.

WEDNESDAY, July 15. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One and a half-mile haul to lot. Coming on to lot in the morning the stringer wagon went through a culvert, and driver Davie Keene had to send to lot to get jacks and men to get it out.

Charlie Kershaw joined the Annex to-day. This is the home of the father of our manager, J. T. McCaddon, and as a natural consequence he met many of his friends and relatives. It rained hard in the afternoon and again at night.

Business in the afternoon big, in the evening fair.

Lot, Gant's Park, on West Main street.

Arena, 181 x 359.

Massillon, Ohio.

THURSDAY, July 16. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. Half a mile haul to lot, which, owing to recent heavy rains, we found in bad condition. To-day, the most serious and saddest accident of the season happened, which came very near terminating the lives of several of our side show musicians. During parade this morning, the eight horses attached to the second band wagon, upon which rides the side show band, passed under the steel overhead bridge of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The parade was laid out to go under the side of the bridge, which is depressed several feet to allow the passage of electric street cars. The parade started under the depressed side, but a street car coming up from the opposite direction compelled the parade to go under the other side. The driver of the eight-horse band wagon did not notice that the bridge was low, nat-   urally following in the wake of the others, who, being all mounted people, could very easily pass under the bridge. The leaders of the team were under the bridge before the driver noticed that it was too low, but then it was too late for him to check his team. The heavy steel structure scraped the men from their seats like ten-pins. Screams and cries from the wounded men rent the air, and the wagon had just appeared on the opposite side of the bridge before the team came to a halt. The wounded men were taken down from the wagon and every attention possible was afforded them; doctors and ambulances were telephoned to come to the scene and render their assistance. It was no time before four or five of the best physicians that Massillon affords were there, and the summary of the injured men was as follows:

Antonio Grancioso, chest crushed, shoulder broken in two places, head cut, fatal results expected; Domenico Flucco, crushed about heart, condition most serious; Dave Denio (Davie Keene), leg broken, head cut and badly bruised; Alfred Vitelli, collar-bone broken; G. Moccia, back injured and face cut; Philip Reichia, cut and bruised about the head and body. All of the injured men were taken to the Aultman Hospital, eight miles distant, with the exception of Antonio Grancioso, whose condition was too serious to permit of his removal from the hotel. The latest report from all was that they were resting quietly and doing nicely.

Another accident happened this afternoon. Tom Oliver (Cossack Tom), the Cossack interpreter, was standing back of the back wall while Johnnie Baker, the Young American marksman, was doing his act. In shooting at the pigeons, one of the shots went through the side wall and struck Tom in the eye and another went through the left ear, and he will in all probability be seen around the camp with a bandage on his head for several days. Barney Link, an old-time Wild West man, but now manager of the American Bill-posting Co., of Brooklyn, N. Y., paid us a visit to-day while on his way to Milwaukee. General Coxey was at the show this afternoon, but minus his army. Dan Taylor left to-day for Cleveland to get the lot in readiness for our opening there next Monday.

Business at both performances good.

Lot, Tuscarawas River and Walnut street.

Arena, 177 x 346.

Alliance, Ohio.

FRIDAY, July 17. Arrived in town at 3 A. M. One-quarter mile haul to lot, but we did not get all of the wagons on until 9.30 A. M. on account of bad entrance and soft ground. We have been in   [image] BLACKSMITH AND REPAIR SHOP.   the mud for the past two weeks, but we have not, as yet, found anything to equal this. In the arena were three old circus rings and all were full of water, consequently it took a great deal of civil engineering to drain the lot so as to be in condition to give a performance. In loading at night all wagons were run off of the lot empty and everything was carried to them. The last wagon left the lot at 12.30. Basker Hadj Ali, one of our Arabian boys, was taken sick and sent to Cleveland Hospital; he had an attack of typhoid fever.

Business, in the afternoon and evening fair.

Lot, Reeves' Pasture.

Arena, 176 x 360.

Steubenville, Ohio.

SATURDAY, July 18. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot and all up hill. As usual, as has been the case during the past few weeks, it took from twelve to sixteen horses on a wagon; the last wagon did not get on the lot until 12.30 P.M. We started on Eastern time here and, in consequence, were one-half hour late with the afternoon performance. Edwin Aiken, stenographer and secretary to J. T. McCaddon, left for Geneva, Ohio, to-day to spend Sunday with his mother. We got down the hill safely at night and closed up the hardest week that the Wild West show has ever had for two years. We have had to dig more drainage canals during the last two weeks than we did during the whole of the season of 1895 all put together. What is still in store for us we of course do not know, but it certainly cannot be much worse than this last week has been on men and horses.

Business, at both performances fair.

Lot, Pleasant View Park.

Arena, 179 x 365.

Cleveland, Ohio.

SUNDAY, July 19. Arrived in town at 7.30 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot. All work was done in the morning and everything was put up. Willis P. Cobb, of this city, an old-time press agent of the Wallace and Anderson Show, was a guest of James P. Anderson to-day. Rained heavy all the afternoon and night.

MONDAY, July 20. We had a long parade to-day, two and three-quarters hours, and the most of it was made in the rain. Thomas Adamson, ammunition man, and Eddie Holland, assistant, quit to-day and left for New York City. Augustus Beyer and   102 BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST ROUTE BOOK SEASON OF 1896. Harry Coyner, American soldiers, closed to-day. Rained hard most all day, but cleared up a little at night.

Business, in the afternoon good, in the evening big.

TUESDAY, July 21. Michael Quinn was appointed ammunition man to-day, in place of Thomas Adamson, resigned. We had a haul of three and one-half miles to the runs to-night, consequently did not get loaded until 2 A. M.

Weather cloudy and threatening all day.

Business, big at both performances.

Lot, Cedar and Madison avenues.

Arena, 222 x 452.

Sandusky, Ohio.

WEDNESDAY, July 22. Arrived in town at 7.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. Rained hard all morning, consequently wet weather parade. When "Old Glory" was announced this evening no "flag" appeared; a silent wait and still no "Old Glory," the next number was announced and came on. The cause of it being that the American Standard-bearer, Paul H. Weinert, was asleep in the dressing-room, and his comrades had neglected to awaken him. As a consequence there was a combing of hair back of the curtain for a few moments, but, as is usual, it was soon all forgotten. A great surprise awaited us this evening at the cook-tent; it was "chicken," and I think that the singular of the word comes nearer striking it than anything else, for upon investigation it was found that there were only nine small chickens, and the first to arrive at the cook-tent naturally received it all on the staff table; those who were not fortunate enough to get there did "some kicking"; if you don't believe it, ask J. Allen Darnaby.

Business, big at both performances.

Lot, West Monroe street (Lower Sandusky).

Arena, 181 x 346.

Tiffin, Ohio.

THURSDAY, July 23. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. One mile haul to lot. Domenico Flucco, of the Annex Band, a victim of the Massillon bridge accident, returned to-day from the Aultman Hospital, Canton, Ohio. Superintendent of Canvas Thomas Fay went to the car sick to-day. Joe Campbell and Cy Cumpton, Cowboy riders, received a bad fall but no injuries. P. J. Stanton, of the   Annex, was called to Brooklyn to-day by the sad news of his brother's death. The sympathy of the company goes with Paul.

Business, big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, East Market street, old Fair Grounds.

Arena, 181 x 351.

Findlay, Ohio.

FRIDAY, July 24. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. It rained hard all day and the lot was in fearful condition. We were unable to get a wagon on the lot, either in going on or coming off at night. Everything had to be carried to the wagons in the street and men sank up to their knees in mud. A rumor got afloat that only one show would be given, so the band wagon containing the Cowboy Band was sent down town between the shows and an announcement made that there would be an evening show.

Business big. We came near having a turn-away in the afternoon, which was very remarkable considering the weather. Fair business at night.

Lot, Main and Mellville streets.

Arena, 178 x 358.

Toledo, Ohio.

SATURDAY, July 25. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. Three-mile haul to lot. Everything was put up to-day in anticipation of a big business, and, as it proved, we were not disappointed. All the front door men had to take a hand in getting ready this morning, and, as is usual with that class of people, they took what was the easiest to do—spread sawdust. The horse of Salem Hadj, one of the Arabian boys, fell with him to-day and sprained his right knee. To-day closes up our third week in Ohio, and we are all happy to get out of this State. Out of the eighteen stands we have had nine days hard rain and seventeen muddy lots, Toledo being the only dry lot we have had, and it is something to be proud of. Toledo will always occupy a bright spot in our memory.

Business, turn-away in the afternoon, very big at night.

Lot, Dorr and Hawley streets.

Arena, 222 x 451.

Detroit, Mich.

SUNDAY, July 26. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot. Everything we had was put   [image] Courier Co. "FRED."   up again to-day. Chas. Hutchinson, Joe Quaid, Charles Ramsey, Charles Petty, Harry Barnum, Fred Hutchinson and Edwin Aiken went to Mt. Clemens, Mich., to see the worst game of ball that was ever played. They stood up in a car all the way out and starved all the way back. They had a lay-out of several hours, and finally reached the city at 1.30 A. M., a poor but wiser lot of men.

Weather cloudy, and heavy wind and rain at night. It did no damage to our canvas, but only made the mud deeper on the lot.

MONDAY, July 27. It was an utter impossibility to walk across the lot this morning without wearing rubber boots, as the water was a foot deep in some places, but drains were soon made, and by noon everything was in readiness for the afternoon performance. P. J. Stanton, of the Annex, returned from Brooklyn to-day, and it seems natural to see "Pete's" face around again, and to hear him tell of the wonders which could be found in the Annex. Bucking-horse "Jubilee" fell to-day with rider Chas. Higley, who received a badly sprained knee. Maj. Burke's genial countenance was seen to-day for the first time since Chicago. Weather cloudy and threatening all day but no rain.

Business in the afternoon fair, at night big.

TUESDAY, July 28. Geo. Goodman, superintendent of the programme, resigned to-day and left for Duluth, Minn., where he will take charge of the Duluth Press. W. R. Harburger was appointed in his place. J. D. Nagle, Emigrant Commissioner for the Big Horn Basin Land Company, was a guest of Col. W. F. Cody to-day. Chas. Trego, the old superintendent of the bronco stable, gave us a call to-day while on his way to the Big Horn Basin. W. H. Lushbaugh, maker of our canvas, of Covington, Ky., was a guest of Manager J. T. McCaddon to-day. Manager Nate Salsbury came in to-night from the Big Horn Basin. We had a hard pack-up to-night, as everything had to be carried off of the lot and loaded, and the mud was knee-deep. It was 12:30 before the last wagon was off the lot.

Weather cloudy and threatening all day.

Business in the afternoon light, at night big.

Lot, Grand River avenue and Hudson street.

Arena, 219 x 452.

Saginaw, Mich.

WEDNESDAY, July 29. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M., a good run considering its length, and the late start from Detroit. We had a mile and a half   haul to the lot. James A. Bailey left the "Greatest Show on Earth" long enough to give us a call this morning, but returned at night. S. H. Davis (Red), an old-time candy butcher, closed to-day and left for Philadelphia. Everyone was sorry to see "Red" go. Both J. A. Bailey and Nate Salsbury left on the evening train for the East.

Weather fine.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Union Park Race Track.

Arena, 180 x 450.

Port Huron, Mich.

THURSDAY, July 30. Arrived in town at 6.15 A. M. One and a half mile haul to lot. McGreggor and Lowanda's ten cent side-show, that was across the street from us in Toledo, Ohio, and Detroit, Mich., showed up again to-day. This was a "great" opposition, and a better chance for our orators, as they were located very near our Annex, and Messrs. Stanton and Morris distinguished themselves to-day. We were loaded the quickest to-night that we have been this season, all canvas being down before the concert was over.

Weather clear and fine.

Business fair at both performances.

Lot, LaPierre avenue.

Arena, 183 x 361.

Bay City, Mich.

FRIDAY, July 31. Arrived in town at 6 30 A. M One and a half mile haul to lot. To-night we leave the F. & P. M. Railway with regret, as we have received the greatest amount of attention from the officers of this road, and Mr. Potter, the division superintendent, has governed his crew and given us the best of runs, which goes to prove that Mr. Potter is up in his line of railroad business. Cowboy Ed. Hughes' horse jumped the guard-rope to-night, and knocked down an electric light pole, which put out one circuit for about three minutes. He received a sprained knee, and will now be seen around camp for a few days on crutches. Cowboy Abe LeDuke had his left elbow dislocated while trying to mount a bucking horse.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, Bay County Fair Grounds.

Arena, 185 x 370.

 

J. G. SPRAKER & SON, Dealers in all kinds of Flour Feed, Oil Meal, Stock Food, Etc.

SOUTHWEST CORNER SQUARE, KOKOMO, IND.


M. L. SWAYZEE. F. C. SWAYZEE. M. B. HUNTER. Swayzee Bros. & Hunter,

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

GROCERIES FEED AND SEEDS

502 SOUTH WASHINGTON STREET, 513 SOUTH WASHINGTON STREET, 109, 111 WEST FIFTH STREET, MARION, IND.


DEAM & STUDABAKER, Livery and Funeral Supplies.

FAMILY CARRIAGES FREE

Furnishes the Best Teams for Country Routes.

Controls Locations for New Bill Boards, and erects them.

Furnishes Feed to all Shows.

PRICES LOW. SERVICES GUARANTEED.

REFERENCE: Buffalo Bill's Wild West.

MARKET STREET, BLUFFTON, IND.

 

THE E. L. KINNEMAN LICENSED Bill Posting Company.

Up-to-Date Bill Posters, Distributers. General Outdoor Advertisers.

We Control all Bill Board and Advertising Space in

MARION, Indiana, . . . Population 22,000 JONESBORO, Indiana, . . . " 3,000 GAS CITY, " . . . " 5,000 FAIRMOUNT, " . . . " 4,000 Total . . . 34,000

Which are connected by Electric Street Cars, Big Four, Pan Handle and Clover Leaf Lines.

All Boards on ELECTRIC STREET CAR, PAN HANDLE, BIG FOUR and CLOVER LEAF LINES

CAPACITY, 7,000 SHEETS.

OFFICE, BILL ROOM, THE WHITE THEATRE, Marion, Ind.


JOS. W. HIXSON. SAM. R. HIXON. Members of "Interstate" and Bill Posters' Associations of Ohio

HIXSON BROTHERS LICENSED Bill Posters and Distributers

Card and Sign Tackers.

Population of Piqua,15,000 PIQUA, OHIO.

 

ROBBINS & MOORE, PROPRIETORS OF Border City Livery

FEED AND SALE STABLE. HACK AND TRANSFER LINE.

East Side Public Square,PIQUA, OHIO.

Special Attention to Country Routes.


O. L. BLACK, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Grain, Choice Baled Hay

Straw and all kinds of Feed.

304 EAST THIRD ST., DAYTON, OHIO.

Reference, Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Sells Bros. Shows.


COURT LIVERY AND SALE STABLE

W.H. McGOWEN, Proprietor.

FIRST-CLASS TEAMS FOR COUNTRY ROUTES.

No. 3 ARTZ LANE, North of Court House, Dayton, Ohio.


WOLF BROTHERS,General BILL POSTERS AND DISTRIBUTERS

Members "Inter-State" Association.

Only Bill Posting Firm in the City.

5,000 feet of Good Boards.

PRICES REASONABLE.

ADDRESS, GENERAL DELIVERY P. O. DAYTON, OHIO.

 

R. W. SOUTHARD & SON, Livery HACK, AND BAGGAGE TRANSFER.

Teams furnished for Country Routes. Have handled all the big shows for years.

CORNER FRANKLIN AND MARKET STREETS Kenton, Ohio.

REFERENCE, BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST.


JOHN CALLAM & CO. John Callam. Ed. Boulton. THE Lumber Dealers

KENTON, OHIO.

Have built all the Circus Bill Boards at Kenton for Twenty Years.

REFERENCES.—Barnum & Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth. Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World.

Lithograph Boards a Specialty.

 

E. A. SCHAEFFER & CO. Dealers in Flour, Feed, Grain and Hay.

80 & 82 WEST MAIN STREET, TELEPHONE 280. Springfield, Ohio.


I. N. PANGLE, Livery and Feed Stable.

Teams Furnished for Country Routes.

HAS DONE ALL THE CIRCUS WORK FOR PAST 16 YEARS.

No. 207 East Market Street, Telephone No. 88. LIMA, OHIO.

REFERENCES.—Barnum & Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth. Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World.


W. C. TIRRILL & CO., Licensed BILL POSTERS

Members Associated Bill Posters' Association of the U. S. and Canada, and Bill Posters' Association of the State of Ohio.

Office, 216 W. Market St. 'PHONE 56.LIMA, OHIO.


YOU WILL FIND US JUST EAST OF PUBLIC SQUARE ON MARKET STREET AT

The HARROD

We have just remodeled this hotel at great expense and are prepared to take the best of care of the traveling public. We claim ours the best hotel in the city. Our bar is stocked with the finest, our sample rooms unexcelled. Give us a call. OPEN ALL HOURS.

ATTLEBERGER & SNYDER, Proprietors. RATE, $2.00. LIMA, OHIO.

 

NEW Kerr House

MARION, OHIO.

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STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS

Steam Heat. Electric Light. Hot and Cold Baths.

ONE BLOCK FROM THE OPERA HOUSE.

Only Hotel having a Buffet in connection. $2.00 per day. American Plan. Special Rates to the Profession.

W. R. BINGHAM & COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, Proprietors.


GEORGE T. MANN, Licensed City Bill Poster

AND CONTRACTOR OF NEW BOARDS AND ALL KINDS OF SMALL BOARDS, SIGNS, ETC.

Distributing and all kinds of Outdoor Advertising a Specialty.

ESTIMATES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION.

POPULATION, 15,000.

Marion, Ohio.

Member of Ohio State Bill Posting Association.

 

WM. B. HALL CITY LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLES

Teams for Country Routes, also Furnishes Feed, and Guarantees Lowest Prices in the City for all

PHONE 153 Nos. 17 and 19 WALNUT STREET, Mansfield, Ohio.


The Watkins Livery Co.

FEED, SALE AND BOARDING STABLE

Have Furnished Country Teams for all the Big Shows

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST.

136 and 138 N. Main Street, MARION, OHIO.

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COL. W. F. CODY (BUFFALO BILL) IN A CLOSE SHAVE

 

MILLER BROS. Licensed Bill Posters

53 WEST TOWN STREET, COLUMBUS, OHIO


J. H. ATCHERSON, LIVERY, BOARDING and SALES Stables

HACKS

TELEPHONE NO. 1253 No. 40 LYNN ALLEY, Rear of Board of Trade, COLUMBUS, OHIO.

 

ROBERT L. SEEDS, DEALER IN . . Grain, Hay, Straw, Oats, GLUTEN MEAL, ETC.

49 EAST NAGHTEN STREET, Columbus, O.


D. W. LUCAS, DEALER IN Flour, Feed, Grain and Seeds

Have Furnished all the Big Shows.

Reference: Buffalo Bill's Wild West.

No. 5 NORTH FOURTH STREET, 'PHONE 279. Newark, O.


C. W. HOOVER. W. M. GRAVES. HOOVER AND GRAVES, Livery and feed.

Have Furnished all the Big Shows Teams for Country Routes for the past Ten Years.

TELEPHONE No. 14. Rear of Hotel Warden. Newark, O.


J. M. GARBER, Contractor Builder and Lessee of Bill Boards

AND LITHOGRAPH BOARDS

CONTROLS THE BEST LOCATIONS IN THE CITY

Newark, O.

 

TANNEHILL & KELLY, DEALERS IN FEED, GRAIN AND HAY

REFERENCES: Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Sells Bros. & Forepaugh Shows.

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, N. Fifth St., Market Place, TELEPHONE 178. ZANESVILLE, O.


JOHN H. CROOKS, PROPRIETOR OF Hacks and Carriages Livery and Feed Stables

I have furnished Livery for all Shows for the past Twenty-one Years

North Fifth St. Zanesville, O.


R. D. SCHULTZ, MANAGER SCHULTZ OPERA HOUSE

OWNS AND CONTROLS ALL THE BILL BOARDS IN ZANESVILLE , OHIO.


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Buffalo Bill—SHOOTING GLASS BALLS

 

H. V. KRAMER,TRANSFER LINE

City Bill Poster and Distributer.

FIRST-CLASS TEAMS FOR COUNTRY ROUTES Controls all Bill Boards.

OFFICE AND STABLES: MILL STREET, Rear Hotel Conrad, Massillon, O.

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F. W. GASKILL. THE FRANK W. GASKILL COMPANY

Grocers Bakers and Mfg. Confections

Complete Orders for Camp Supplies

MANAGER OPERA HOUSE.

Controls all BILL BOARDS in Alliance.

Supplied Barnum & Bailey Show, Season 1895, and the Buffalo Bill Wild West, Season 1896

ALLIANCE, OHIO.


Open Day and Night. Telephone No. 10.

SHIDLER'S City Livery

FIRST-CLASS TURN-OUTS.

RATES REASONABLE. Country Routes a Specialty.

SENECA STREET, Rear of Post-office ALLIANCE, OHIO.

 

THE FIRM OF PLATT, SPONGE, AND KELLY.

This firm was organized in Philadelphia, Pa., April 22, 1895. The object of the organization was to open a barber shop and cater to the trade of the canvasmen connected with the Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

Platt, the senior member of the firm, was the first assistant boss canvasman for the company, and Sponge and Kelly were old-time canvasmen. Platt was to be the silent partner of the firm, but was to furnish all the necessary capital to put the business on a good financial basis. Sponge and Kelly were to do all the work, and the profit was to be divided equally between each member of the firm. Platt bought two razors and a pair of barber shears, got the use of a wheelbarrow from the stake-and-chain wagon to serve as a barber chair, got two old pieces of canvas for towels, stole a bar of soap from the cook-house, and then turned the property over to Sponge and Kelly as a complete outfit, and remarked to the boys at the same time, "Now, that is one of the best barber shops that ever traveled with a show."

It was under these conditions that the firm of Platt, Sponge & Kelly was embarked upon the commercial world without a cent of indebtedness and an assured patronage of not less than $3.50 per week. No firm ever had a more brilliant future before it. Platt had fulfilled his part of the contract and all the rest had to be left to the honesty, industry and integrity of Sponge and Kelly. As all work had to be done on the basis of weekly payments, Sponge got up early Saturday morning and collected all of the money due the firm. He bought a pair of rubber boots and then proceeded to fill up on the rest of the firm's capital. The second week Kelly got the start of Sponge and collected the money and replenished his wardrobe before Sponge had turned out. As the firm went on you could always tell who collected the money. If it was Sponge he was drunk; if it was Kelly his wardrobe showed an elaborate expenditure of money. Platt, the capitalist, could never get an account, or a cent of returns. He tried in vain to get his investment back, but in show language he "was not in it."

 

Finally Sponge and Kelly fell out about the proceeds. Sponge had missed several weeks with his usual drunk, while Kelly's wardrobe had assumed mammoth proportions. He was living on easy street and persisted in keeping so. Under the new arrangements each one was to keep one razor and each alternate week the barber shears changed hands; they kept one towel each, the wheelbarrow was returned to the stake-and-chain wagon, and the firm proceeded as usual with its business.

It was now that "Frog" Kelly, as he was known among us, showed originality in bookkeeping that was worthy a better cause and was never equalled in the history of the commercial world up to the present date. One afternoon in Portland, Me., I was coming past Kelly's shop when a canvasman had just got up from one of Kelly's operations. I noticed that he had three cuts on the side of his face and blood was running out of each one of them and dripping down on his clothes until he looked as if he had just come out of a slaughterhouse. After he had gone I asked "Frog" why he had cut the man so. He then informed me that it was the way he had of keeping tally. "Now, that man owes me for three shaves; on pay-day I just look at his face and collect accordingly. It also protects my customers from Sponge; he keeps a book and his accounts are mixed all the time." The firm lived and prospered under the circumstances the remainder of the season. At Atlanta, Ga., on the last day, Sponge said to Kelly: "Now, 'Frog,' Platt has done what is right by us all summer, let us treat him white. We have one razor each and the shears; now, it will not be right for us to keep them all. A horse stepped on my razor last night and broke the handle and bent the shank; it is all right with those exceptions. Now, I propose to give Platt that razor, you keep the other one, and I will keep the shears. I think this will be an equal division and show him we are willing to divide on a fair basis, or equal division among all concerned."

Thus ended the existence of the firm of Platt, Sponge & Kelly, after a six months successful career. They closed as they started, not owing a cent; but, as usual with such great undertakings, the poor fellow who furnished the capital had to suffer

 

B. W. METTENBERGER, Livery AND BOARDING STABLES

Furnish all Shows with First-Class Teams for Country Routes.

104 N. FOURTH ST., 111 Court Street, Opp. Court House. Steubenville, Ohio.


E. L. HAMMOND, DEALER IN GRAIN FLOUR SEEDS AND FEED

110 N. Fifth Street, Steubenville, O.

Supplied Barnum & Bailey, 1895; Buffalo Bill's Wild West, 1896.

 

CHAS. J. VOGEL, City Bill Poster

Controls all Boards.

Also Manager City Opera House

STEUBENVILLE, OHIO.


JOSEPH G. BARRES, CITY BILL POSTER

ELYRIA, OHIO.

I have erected some excellent boards for the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, which locations are leased by me and will remain up for all Shows and Commercial Posting.

JOS. G. BARRES.


MOSSGROVE'S New U. S. Hotel

Warm Rooms Heated Halls

J. ROSS MOSSGROVE, Prop.

Strictly first-class. Centrally located. Headquarters for professionals. Special rates.

One Block from Opera House.

Office Chas. J. Vogel Manager Opera House.

STEUBENVILLE, O.

 

RIBLET'S LIVERY AND TRANSFER

Is at the service of the public Day and Night. We can furnish you with anything you may desire in the Livery line.

SPECIAL RATES

To Pleasure Parties, Conventions, Country Routes for Shows, Etc.

408 SUPERIOR ST., Telephone 1002. CLEVELAND, O.


GEORGE L. BIVINS LIVERY

FINELY EQUIPPED

FOR WEDDINGS, MOVING WAGONS, AND GENERAL TEAMING.

Furnish Excellent Teams for Show Country Routes

REFERENCES: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST.

58 WEST BROAD STREET. Elyria, Ohio.

 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF HOTELS, RESTAURANTS and MARINE TRADE

The Brandt Provision Co.

WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT, Cooler No. 6 New Sheriff St. Market House, Cleveland, Ohio.

BRANCH MARKETS: Stall 59, Central Market. Stall 17, West Side Market. 235 and 237 Louis Street. Ten Stalls New Sheriff St. Market House. Telephone 4046.

R. F. BRANDT, Manager.

 

BRYAN & CO. BILL POSTERS DISTRIBUTERS & GENERAL OUT DOOR ADVERTSERS

CLEVELAND & AKRON

CLEVELAND OFFICE COR HIGH & MIDDLE STS.

AKRON OFFICE 125 S. MAIN ST

We Reach 400,000 People


CHAS. LEDERER'S SON, DEALER IN Flour, Feed, Grain, Baled Hay and Straw

FURNISH ALL FIRST-CLASS SHOWS.

Store and Office, 11 High St., CLEVELAND, O. TELEPHONE 2026.


GALLAGHER BROS. WHOLESALE Flour, Feed, Hay, Straw, SALT, LIME, CEMENT, ETC.

Shippers of Wheat, Corn, Oats, Etc.

Sandusky, Ohio.

 

Baled Hay and Straw. The City Stock Yards. ESTABLISHED 1858.

LAUER BROS., Groceries and Provisions

Flour, Grain and Mill Feed. Also furnish Groceries, Bread, Etc., for Circuses.

4 and 6 West Market Street. 2, 4, 6, 10, 12, and 14 Water Street. TIFFIN, OHIO.


J. R. LEWIS, City Bill Poster

24 Years

CONTROLS ALL BILL BOARDS.

81 West Perry St., TIFFIN, OHIO.

POPULATION, 14,000.


TIFFIN, OHIO

We control the only Show Grounds in the City. Owners of RIVERVIEW PARK The Electric Railway & Power Co.

Office, 99 WASHINGTON STREET.


The Shawhan

A. A. EDSON, Proprietor.

SPECIAL RATES TO SHOW AGENTS.

REFERENCE—The 75 Advance Corps of the Buffalo Bill Wild West show.

TIFFIN, OHIO

 

W. J. EDWARDS, Omnibus, Carriage, Hack and Transfer Line.

FINE LIVERY IN CONNECTION.

ORDERS RESPONDED TO PROMPTLY NIGHT OR DAY.

COUNTRY ROUTES MY SPECIALTY.

118 E. Crawford Street, Phone 177. FINDLAY, OHIO.


All Work Guaranteed. Population of City, 23,000.

PHILIP B. OLIVER, LICENSED City Bill Poster and DISTRIBUTER.

OWNS AND CONTROLS ALL BOARDS AND DEAD WALLS.

Office, 319 Cherry Street, PHONE 250. FINDLAY, Ohio.

 

RHAMY & MILLER, DEALERS IN Feed, Pumps, Tile, CEMENT, HAIR AND LIME.

Reference, Buffalo Bill's Wild West.

538 S. MAIN STREET, Cor. Main and Hardin. FINDLAY, Ohio.


CHAS. BAETZ, MANAGER

Sandusky OPERA HOUSE AND CEDAR POINT

CONTROLS ALL BILL BOARDS IN SANDUSKY.

SANDUSKY, OHIO.

Pleasure Resort.


Established September, 1867.

FRED. ADAMS & SON, DEALERS IN Flour, Feed Baled Hay Straw, Salt, Oat Meal and Oil Meal.

WE FURNISH ALL BIG SHOWS.

No. 514 Monroe Street, TOLEDO, OHIO.

 

JOSEPH POPP, STABLES

LIVERY, COACH AND COUPE

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO COUNTRY ROUTES.

216, 218, 220, 222 and 224 ST. CLAIR STREET, Toledo, Ohio.


ESTABLISHED 1868. Population of City, 100,000.

George W. Bills, City Bill Poster

Treasurer National Bill Posters' Association.

DISTRIBUTING AND GENERAL ADVERTISING.

TOLEDO, OHIO.

 

Detroit Lumber & Box Factory

(Successors to THE E. G. RICHARDS PLANING MILL)

Wholesale and Retail Manufacturers of

Car Siding and Roofing, Flooring, Ceiling, Bill Stuff, Finishing Lumber AND LITHOGRAPH BOARDS.

Cor. 4th and HOLDEN AVENUES, TELEPHONE 2726. DETROIT, MICH.


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JACOB BECK & SONS,

Manufacturers of the Celebrated Brands of BECKS Breakfastina Breakfast Flakes and "Old Gold" Granulated Corn Meal

HAY, STRAW AND FEED.

METALLIC TELEPHONE, No 4680. OFFICE, 245, 247, 249, 251 CONGRESS STREET W., DETROIT, Mich.

We Supply All Big Shows

 

THE G. F. CASE COACH AND COUPE COMPANY.

COACHES, COUPES, VICTORIAS and LIGHT LIVERIES at all hours.

Special Service for Country Routes.

Refers to BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST, and all other Big Shows.

TELEPHONE 415 14-16 DUFFIELD STREET, DETROIT, Mich.


WALKER & CO. BILL POSTERS AND General Advertisers.

Members of the Associated Bill Posters' Association. Michigan State Bill Posters' Association.

H. W. WALKER, MANAGER.

OFFICE, 53 ROWLAND STREET. TELEPHONE 2484. DETROIT, Mich.

 

S. G. CLAY. C. P. SHERMAN.

CLAY & SHERMAN, Bill Posting and Distributing Company

WE OWN, lease and control all Bill Board stands, Bulletin Boards, Walls, Three-Sheet Boards, Sign and Posting privileges in Saginaw and suburban districts. Designs, Sketches and Estimates for Posting. Signs, etc., free.

Members of Michigan State Bill Posters' Ass'n, Associated Bill Posters' Association.

OFFICE, OPPOSITE ACADEMY OF MUSIC,

SAGINAW, E. S., Mich.


W. S. EDDY, President. H. A. WOLPERT, Vice-Prest. HENRY W. CARR, Sec'y and Treas. A. GERNENZ, Ass't Manager.

Saginaw Milling Co.

Merchant Millers SHIPPERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN HAY AND GRAIN

BRANDS: UPPER CRUST, U. S. PATENT, BLUE BIRD, PEOPLES, SUNFLOWER, CHEAP JOHN.

SUPPLIES ALL THE BIG TE [N] T SHOWS.

SAGINAW, MICH.

 

EAST SAGINAW Omnibus, Carriage and Coupe Line, Livery

BARTOW & ENRIGHT, Proprietors.

CARRIAGES AND COUPES AT ALL HOURS, NIGHT OR DAY.

Furnishes Livery Teams for Country Routes.

218 to 228 North Baum Street, Telephone No. 324, 2 Rings. SAGINAW, E. S., MICH.


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JOHN LAWLER, Livery

OMNIBUSES To and From all Trains. ANDSale Stable

A FULL LINE OF HACKS AND CARRIAGES ALWAYS ON HAND.

Special Attention to Country Routes.

514-516 BROAD ST. AND 331 Superior St. PORT HURON, Mich.


BENNETT Bill Posting Company

CITY BILL POSTERS

MEMBERS MICHIGAN STATE BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION.

BILL POSTING. DISTRIBUTING. Card and Sign Tacking.

LEWIS T. BENNETT, Manager.

Port Huron, Mich.

 

C. J. BLOOMFIELD, Bill Posting and Distributing

Office, 615 WASHINGTON STREET, BAY CITY, MICH.

Population of BAY CITY, 38,000. 2,000 FT. BOARDS.

Population of WEST BAY CITY, 14,000. 1,000 FT. BOARDS.


FRED. LA FRANCE, Hack AND Baggage Line

LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE

IN CONNECTION.

Special Attention Given to Country Routes. Dealer in Hay, Straw and Feed.

Saginaw Street, Bet. Center and Sixth. BAY CITY, MICH.

HACK AND COUPE.

 

Owosso, Mich.

SATURDAY, August 1. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One-mile haul to lot, which we found in bad condition and very uneven. Commenced to rain at 7.30 and poured down until 3.30 P. M., leaving the lot in a bad and muddy condition for the night's performance, also for the boys to pick up on, as it was another case of carry the stuff to the wagons on the street. Baskir Hadj Ali, one of the Arab boys who was left in Cleveland at the hospital sick, rejoined us to-day.

Business in the afternoon big, but light at night.

Lot, Washington street and Corona avenue.

Ann Arbor, Mich.

SUNDAY, August 2. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. All poles were painted and canvas repaired this morning, and we did not put up until night. There was a fishing party to-day composed of the following persons: Manager J. T. McCaddon, Treasurer Jule Keen, Charles and Fred Hutchinson, Press Agent Dexter W. Fellows and Usher J. W. Murray. They drove ten miles out to Wetmore Lake. Manager J. T. McCaddon took the prize by catching the only fish that was caught, which weighed four and one-half pounds. J. Allen Darnaby, Ed Showles, Gerney Spaulding and Ed Aiken drove out to their rescue to help Mr. McCaddon in with his fish. The whole party returned to the cook house at 9.30 P. M. Josh Billings once said that he would not give a "cuss" for a man that could not tell a good fish story; could Josh have heard them the next day he would have bought the whole party. Alfred Vitelli and Phillip Recchia, of the Annex band, and victims of the Massillon bridge accident, returned from the Aultman Hospital at Canton, Ohio, and reported for duty.

Weather clear and pleasant.

MONDAY, August 3. We gave an hour and a quarter parade this morning on sandy roads in sultry weather. William Welton, superintendent of the baggage stock, left to-day for Carversville, Bucks County, Pa., for a two weeks rest to see if his health could not be improved a little. Manager J. T. McCaddon had his four and a half pound bass served for supper this evening; the fish cost $15.40, but it was worth it.

Weather clear and fine.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 179 x 354.

  [image]

Courier Co.

A HOLD UP.

 

Adrian, Mich.

TUESDAY, August 4. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. The Annex opened this morning to a 25-cent admission and to a good business. Ticket-taker Joe Brogan remained in the car sick all day. John Parent joined the Annex band to-day.

Weather cloudy and threatening.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Lawrence Park.

Arena, 189 X 353.

Jackson, Mich.

WEDNESDAY, August 5. Arrived in town at 8 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. Coming in this morning flat car No. 122, containing the cook-house wagon, got a hot-box burned the journal off of the back truck. It broke eight miles from this place and it tore up the ties for 400 feet before the train was stopped. They had to send to Jackson for a new pair of trucks; it delayed us three and a half hours. Morris Doody, of the transportation department, was caught this morning by a stringer wagon coming down the runs and his right knee was badly sprained.

Weather fine but very warm.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Franklin and Fourth streets.

Arena, 185 x 407.

Kalamazoo, Mich.

THURSDAY, August 6. Arrived in town at 7.20 A. M. One-mile haul to lot, which we found in bad condition owing to several streets being graded through it. The weather was against us to-day; very warm and sultry with threatening clouds, heavy rain at 5 30.

Business good in the afternoon but light at night.

Lot, Washington and Stockbridge streets.

Arena, 189 x 354.

Battle Creek, Mich.

FRIDAY, August 7. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. Three-quarters mile haul to lot. Joe Brogan, who has been laid up for several days with a boil on his chin, looked natural to-day again at the front door. Pedro Esquevel made quite a hit to-night when his horse threw him against the orators' stand; he caught his horse and mounted him again amid great applause. There was a great hustle to-night in taking down in order to get out of town before 12   o'clock. The first section left at 11.45, the second at 12.15. W. R. Harburger, superintendent of the programme books, hired another man to-day. The rest of the men claimed that there were too many on the books now, and consequently there was a strike and the following boys quit: Tom Burke, Charles Myers and Frank Quinn.

Weather very warm and sultry all day.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, Chestnut and Henry streets.

Arena, 187 x 355.

Lansing, Mich.

SATURDAY, August 8. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. The cook-house wagon kept up its reputation to-day by breaking a wheel at the runs. There was a strike against the cook-house this evening; none of the dressing-room, soldiers, cowboys, band men or Indians went to supper. There was a council of war held behind the curtains, but the men would not go in. They claimed they were being fed poorly.

Weather very warm and sultry all day with a thunder-shower at 2.10 P. M. and another at 5.30 P. M.

Business big in the afternoon and fair at night.

Lot, Michigan State Fair Grounds.

Arena, 185 x 365.

Grand Rapids, Mich.

SUNDAY, August 9. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot, which was very sandy and used as a dump pile. The weather was warm and the smell still warmer. We were all ready to put up canvas at 9 A. M. when a heavy wind and rain-storm came up. Orders were issued that no canvas should go up to-day. The "Fu-kort" Fishing Club was organized here, composed of the following members: Dexter W. Fellows, president, general contractor and path-finder; Jule Keen, treasurer; Fred B. Hutchinson, in charge of stock; John W. Murray, in charge of tackle; C. R. Hutchinson and J. T. McCaddon, just plain fishermen. Early this morning the above club started for Cascade Lake for a days fishing. In speaking of the trip Mr. Keen, treasurer, states as follows: "We had been informed by the natives that there was a tradition in ancient times some fish were seen near the lake (probably in some market woman's basket). A sight of a fish being caught was such a rare sight, that when Izaak Walton McCaddon (accidentally it is presumed) caught one the entire colony of summer boarders broke out in one spontaneous outburst of applause. Horns were blown, and even noses were treated likewise, in order to produce as much noise as possible over the   lucky member. Two carriage loads of people drove on the bridge overlooking the lake and bright smiles and waving handkerchiefs greeted the HERO of the day. Transportation-master Fred also captured one and was as much surprised as the victim was. Other fish to the number of two were caught by other members of the club after a quick and decisive battle." Lew Decker and his wife spent Sunday with his sister at Elk Rapids, Mich. Most every one else went to Reed's Lake, and Orator Col. J. J. McCarthy had a series of most appalling mishaps befall him. First he fell out of a boat into the lake; next a peanut vendor passed a lead dollar on him, which necessitated a seven-block walk to get a good dollar for the bad one; in the evening at the hotel he hung his clothes, which consisted of a nice new white vest that Mac had sprung that day, near the window; as it rained hard that evening Mac's clothes, vest and all, were soaked, but Mac didn't care. The cook-house strike was called off to day by concessions being made on both sides.

Weather very warm and sultry with the exception of a short rain and wind-storm at 9 A. M.

MONDAY, August 10. There was a heavy rain at 1 P.M. and it put the sand pile we had for a lot in better condition than we could with sprinklers and saved a lot of expense and horse flesh. There were two sections of reserves taken out this afternoon but the rush was so great that they had to be put back again. We had a hard time getting off to-night. Everything was to the hubs in sand, and in hauling all teams had to be doubled up.

Business immense at both performances.

Lot, Grand Island.

Arena, 187 x 465.

Muskegon, Mich.

TUESDAY, August 11. Arrived in town at 4 45 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. Bert Antes, an American soldier, fell back during parade, and while trying to catch up ran over a little boy and cut his right leg badly, and left several other bad bruises on his body. At 6.50 a wind-storm struck us and the canvas on the east side went down, and at 7.05 the west side came over into the arena, carrying electric light poles and lamps with it; both horse tents and dressing-room were let down, and in fifteen minutes the place looked like a wreck. Things were in a bad condition, and orders were given to pack, as no show would be attempted to-night. It was a hard pack up, and everything went backwards, and we did not get through much   [image] JOHNNY BAKER. [image] ANNIE OAKLEY.   before our regular time. From this time on we will keep our weather-eye open for the little white clouds.

Business big in the afternoon.

Lot, Terrace and Pine streets.

Arena, 186 x 338.

THOSE LITTLE WHITE CLOUDS.

When you see one of those little white clouds come up—
  The ones that go a twisting around;
If you have any canvas up at this time,
  Look out, or it will all come down.

These little white clouds can smell canvas,
  And there's another thing about them, I know,
They will make a "bee line" for a show lot,
  And down your canvas will go.

These little white clouds hate a showman—
  They like to see things fly around;
They were never known to be content
  Until they had the whole thing down.

They like to hear canvas rip and tear—
  To them it's a beautiful sound;
But to us it is a serious thing
  To see a big show blow down.

Benton Harbor, Mich.

WEDNESDAY, August 12. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One and a half-mile haul to lot. Cowboy Ed. Hughes was called home to Minco, Indian Territory, on account of the illness of his mother. Superintendent of canvas, Thomas Fay, closed to-day and left for Chicago. Jake Platt was put in charge of canvas. Dr. E. D. Colvin was a guest of the show this afternoon. This was William Sweeney's birthday, and he was kindly remembered by the band boys in the way of several small presents. American soldier Bert Antes closed to-day.

Weather cloudy, rained all evening.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Broadway and Colfax street.

Arena, 189 x 344.

Goshen, Ind.

THURSDAY, August 13. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot. George Perrin's Wagon Show stopped to feed here, and were located close to our grounds. The whole troupe were guests of the show this afternoon. Gustaff Pauska, a German soldier, was kicked out of the dressing-room this afternoon with positive orders never to   [image] FRED B. HUTCHINSON. [image] SAMUEL FELDSER.   return. The complaint being that he was appropriating all the other soldiers' money and funds to his own use.

Weather cloudy, rain in the afternoon.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, Pearl and Monroe streets.

Arena, 185 x 360.

South Bend, Ind.

FRIDAY, August 14. Arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot. The lot was in fine condition in the forenoon and looked good. At 4 P. M. a heavy rain came up that lasted two hours, and at the end of that time the lot was ready to join our long list of bad lots. More horses fell during the evening performance than at any other performance this season. August Beree and Herman Montery, French soldiers, received bad falls during the evening performance by their horses stepping into holes. Chief Loucas, of the Cossacks, had a bad fall to-night which resulted in the death of his horse, a beautiful animal, and a black eye to the chief. He had run into one of the bad places in the arena, and as he fell his horse's neck was broken. They carried the chief out, but as soon as he was in the dressing-room he came to and was all right, with the exception of a few bruises. The chief mourns over the loss of his horse, for during the four years he has been with the Wild West, he and his horse have been inseparable. We had a long pull and a long haul to-night.

Business fair.

Lot, Arnold and Division streets.

Arena, 180 x 344.

Michigan City, Ind.

SATURDAY, August 15. Arrived in town at 7 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot, which was very sandy and bad to get on. Ed. Lacey was to-day appointed first assistant superintendent of canvas, and H. VanBuren took charge of the horse tents. One of James Black's horses had his foot caught in the crossing to-night and fell on Jim, dislocating his right shoulder and elbow.

Weather clear and cool.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Willard Avenue Base Ball Grounds.

Arena, 146 X 350.

Joliet, Ill.

SUNDAY, August 16. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One-mile haul to lot. Everything was put up early except the big top, and that was left until   [image] Courier Co. COWBOYS.   morning. Cowboy Phil Smith was called to Phillipsburgh, Kansas, on account of illness of his wife. Domonic Flocco, one of the Annex Band, closed to-day. Christian Shetting, of the Cowboy Band, went to Chicago sick to-day. Mrs. John Burke, wife of stage coach driver John Burke, gave us a call to-day. Mrs. M. B. Bailey, came down from Chicago to spend Sunday with her husband.

Weather fine.

MONDAY, August 17. Six-horse driver James Black, who had his arm and shoulder dislocated in Michigan City, closed to-day and left for Philadelphia. John Curley, of the stake-and-chain wagon, left this afternoon for Chicago, to go to the hospital. J. A. Berscheid joined the Annex Band to-day. Dan. Taylor left this evening for Milwaukee to prepare the lot for our next Monday and Tuesday engagement.

Business big at both performances.

Weather cool and clear.

Lot, Second Avenue—Old Fair Grounds.

Arena, 181 x 360.

Streator, Ill.

MONDAY, August 18. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. Unloaded close to lot. James Rushenberger, driver of the famous eight grays, left for St. Luke's Hospital, Chicago, to-day, on account of a broken bone in his right foot.

Weather fine.

Business fair at both performances.

Lot, Iowa avenue and A., T. & S. Fe R. R. tracks.

Arena, 186 x 353.

Aurora, Ill.

WEDNESDAY, August 19. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. One and a quarter-mile haul to lot. Three sections for the first time since we have been away from Cumberland, Md., last spring James O. Heyworth, president of the Coliseum Building, was a guest of manager J. T. McCaddon to-day. Whiting Allen, press agent, called to-day. William H. Harvell and H. H. Cross, of Chicago, old-time showmen, were the guests of M. B. Bailey to-day. Joseph Walsh, of the Cowboy Band, closed to-day.

Weather fine.

Business fair.

Lot, Driving Park.

Arena, 182 x 360.

Elgin, Ill.

THURSDAY, August 20. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One and a half-mile haul to lot. The four-   [image] S. H. SEMON. [image] GEO. W. FURSMAN.   horse gray team got down in the stock cars last night and were so badly cut and bruised that they will not be able to work for several days. Sergeant Julius von Natzmer, of the German Cuirassiers, was the recipient of a fine gold watch and chain from his company. Dan. Taylor returned to-day from Milwaukee. Manager J. T. McCaddon left to-night for Chicago. Dan. Taylor left for Minneapolis to-night.

Weather fair. Business big at both performances.

Lot, Race Track.

Arena, 190 x 364.

Dixon, Ill.

FRIDAY, August 21. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot. We were given a fast ride in here this morning, making the last forty-one miles in fifty-eight minutes. During the bucking-horse act this afternoon, Col. Cody had his right arm caught in his lasso, and it was badly bruised and sprained, and it was with difficulty that he was able to do his shooting act. There were no street cars in this town, but that did not interfere with our business any, even if we were a great ways out.

Business, nearly a turn-away in the afternoon, big at night.

Lot, Pleasure Park Race Track.

Arena, 185 x 345.

Freeport, Ill.

SATURDAY, August 22. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot, which we found very uneven and soft from last night's rain. Cook-house wagon No. 3 broke the record this morning by getting off of the runs and turning upside down. Salam Hadj Ali, of the Arabian troupe, closed to-day and left for New York City to-night. John Parker, superintendent of Annex canvas, also closed to-night. A. C. Wilson was placed in charge of Annex canvas in place of Parker.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Stevenson street.

Arena, 189 x 350.

Milwaukee, Wis.

SUNDAY, August 23. We arrived in fairly good season, considering the run of 133 miles. It was 8 A. M. when the last section arrived at the crossing. The haul to the lot was three miles, and it was 12.15 before the last wagon reached the lot. Everything was put up to-day with the anticipation of a big business. Edward Fletcher (English), in coming up from the runs this morning with the band wagon, had the reins switched from his hands, and in trying   [image] WHITING ALLEN. [image] J. E. ALLIEN.   150 BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST ROUTE BOOK SEASON OF 1896. to recover them he fell from the wagon, striking his head on the paved street, fracturing his skull. He was immediately taken to a drug store near by, and from there to the hospital, where it was learned that his injuries were fatal. Nothing could be done for him but to try and relieve him of his pain, if he had any, for he never regained consciousness. Mrs. Schaffer and Mrs. Clarke, wives of "Schaffer and Clarke," of the Annex, came from Chicago to-day to remain during our engagement here. This evening the members of the band were invited to the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lehfeldt, where they enjoyed a grand banquet. Mr. T. V. Murphy officiated as chairman for the occasion. Numerous songs recitations, etc., were indulged in, and at the table the "boys" proved themselves to be full-fledged men in doing justice to the grand spread which had been prepared for them. On motion, it was decided that Mr. G. T. Mitchell, one of the band members, should compose a march, and that it should be called "The Banquet March," and be respectfully dedicated to Mrs. Lehfeldt, with kindest regards of the band—said march to be played only by the Cowboy band. Many toasts were tendered the host and hostess, and all present wished the world was composed of many such whole-souled, big-hearted people as Mr. and Mrs. Lehfeldt have proven themselves to be. Besides the band, those present were Mrs. Captain Lehfeldt, Mr. Henry Lehfeldt, Miss Martha Lehfeldt, Mr. and Mrs. Haiser, Mr. and Mrs. Warner and Mrs. Clara Lehfeldt.

MONDAY, August 24. This was an ideal show-day with an ideal business. We had the largest arena that the Wild West has showed in for four years. The house was full in the afternoon and a turn-away at night. Chief Usher McCune did himself proud to-night, as it was the best seated house of the season—not a vacant seat was to be found. John Curley, of the stake-and-chain wagon, who has been in the hospital at Chicago for the past week, returned to work to-day. A. C. Wilson was to-day appointed superintendent of the Annex canvas. Mrs. John Franz and Mrs. M. B. Bailey were guests to-day. Dan. Taylor returned this morning from Minneapolis and St. Paul, where he has been on business for the company.

Weather clear and still.

TUESDAY, August 25. We had another serious accident to-day, but not fatal. Lewis Schilbe, who joined the show this morning as a driver, was injured at the runs this evening. His wagon struck a curbstone and he was thrown from his seat and severely injured. He was sent to his home in this city. Assistant chief of the Cowboys, Bill Brace, was thrown from his horse during the bucking-horse   [image] WM. McCUNE. [image] LOUIS McKOWN.   act this evening, but no bones were broken, and outside of being badly shaken up no other injuries were sustained. Captain Julius von Natzmer was kept busy all day entertaining German friends, and the German Cuirassiers were well received and applauded here.

Weather bad to-day, with high southwest wind and rain at 6 P. M.

Business big at both performances.

Lot, 31st street, between Vliet and Chestnut.

Arena, 236 x 457.

Madison, Wis.

WEDNESDAY, August 26. Arrived in town at 7.15 A. M., which was very early considering the long haul of last night, and a delay of forty minutes in a freight yard on account of a fire in a storage house near the track. Manager McCaddon, Fred Hutchinson, and J. W. Murray, of the "Fu-Kort" Fishing Club, went fishing after the afternoon show and returned with forty of the finest kind of lake bass. They all swore that they caught them, and as there was no proof to the contrary, it was declared around the camp to be the most successful fishing excursion of the season. Driver Edward Fletcher, who fell from his wagon in Milwaukee, died at three o'clock this afternoon at the Emergency Hospital.

Business big. Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 193 X 362.

Janesville, Wis.

THURSDAY, August 27. Arrived in town at 4 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot. All flags were at half-mast to-day, and employees of the little horse tent wore crape on their hats out of respect for Edward Fletcher. Ed. Showles went to Milwaukee to look after his burial. He was embalmed, and the remains were taken from the Emergency Hospital to the Union Cemetery, Milwaukee. Edward Fletcher, known to us as "English," was born in Manchester, England, and was thirty-four years of age. He was employed for the past eight years with the Forepaugh Show and the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, and no one had more friends or was more respected than "English." This is the second time death has visited our camp, and we sincerely hope we will not have to record another this season. Dave Watt, an old-time showman, but now a resident of this city, was a guest of the show to-day.

Business, nearly a turn-away in the afternoon, crowded and about a hundred people sitting on the grass.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 188 x 354.

  [image]

GEO. BURCH.

[image]

WM. BRACE.

 

Rockford, Ill.

FRIDAY, August 28. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. Two-mile haul to lot, which we found very uneven, as there were two graded streets running through it. Every blue seat we had was put up to-day, and they were all needed at the afternoon performance.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Harlem avenue, known as Old Camp Grounds.

Arena, 191 x 408.

Racine, Wis.

SATURDAY, August 29. We had a series of small things happen on our run to-night; among them was the falling of a brake-rod and a bad flat wheel, which delayed us so that we did not get into town until 6.30 A. M. One-mile haul to lot. Edward C. Wiebe, of the electric-light department, left to-day to join the Augustine Neuville Dramatic Company, at Louisville, Ky. John Curly left again to-night to go to the hospital in Milwaukee. James Rushenberger returned to-day from St. Luke's Hospital, Chicago. Indian Two Dog and wife closed to-day and left for Pine Ridge Agency to-night. M. Coyle, excursion agent and railroad manager, was with us to-day. To-night closes one of the best weeks of the season, so far as a financial basis is considered.

Weather warm, and everything that could be desired.

Business good at both performances.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 187 x 363.

Sheboygan, Wis.

SUNDAY, August 30. We arrived in town at 4.30 A. M. This is the most beautiful place to Sunday in that we ever had, either this season or last. It is on a high bluff, overlooking the lake. The "Fu-kort" Fishing Club had another outing to-day, which proved to be the most successful one they ever had, they bringing back 147 lake perch. We all wish they would go every Sunday.

MONDAY, August 31. We had to borrow hose from the city in order to sprinkle the arena, it was so sandy, and at night all wagons had to be hook-roped off the lot. At 4 P. M. over two thousand people stood on the bluff to see our Indians go in bathing in the lake. We had for supper some of the fish that the "Fu-kort" Club caught yesterday.

Weather, clear and cool.

Business, in the afternoon big, fair at night.

Lot, So. Eighth and Tellingham streets.

  [image]

Season of 1896 Permanent Address, N. Y. CLIPPER. WITH Buffalo Bill's Wild West.

Schafer & Clark

THE ECCENTRIC GERMAN MUSICAL COMEDIANS IN A TWENTY-MINUTE GERMAN COMEDY MUSICAL ACT.

AN UP-TO-DATE Laughing Success and a positive departure from the old stereotyped style of Musical Acts.

 

HALL BROS. The Leading Grocers OF OWOSSO

MAKE SPECIAL PRICES TO ALL THE LARGE SHOWS.

SEE THEM BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER.

Owosso, Mich.

 

W. A. HUBBARD, SALE AND Boarding Stable

First-Class Turn-outs at Reasonable Prices

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO COUNTRY ROUTES

415 GENESEE STREET, Telephone No. 82. Owosso, Mich.


C. W. AIKEN. ARTHUR WHELAN

AIKEN & WHELAN, Dealers in all Kinds of flour and feed MEAL, OATS, BALED HAY, STRAW, Etc.

We furnish all the large shows.

Owosso, Mich.


H. C. WILMOT, City BILL POSTER and DISTRIBUTER.

33 NORTH MAIN STREET,

Bill Poster for Twenty-three years.

Ann Arbor, Mich.

 

GEO. W. SWEET, DEALER IN FLOUR, FEED and GRAIN BALED HAY AND STRAW, Wood, Brick, Lime, Hair, Plaster and Cements.

REFERENCE: Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

10 FOURTH AVENUE, ANN ARBOR, MICH.


J. A. POLHEMUS, Hack, Baggage and Livery Line

Omnibus Transfer

25 YEARS.

I Furnish all Big Shows Country Teams.

Good Livery Always on Hand. Baggage Moved at Any Time. Prices Reasonable.

TELEPHONE 15. ANN ARBOR, MICH.

 

C. VAN OSTRAND, Bill Poster and DISTRIBUTER

25 years in active service.

All Contracts FAITHFULLY CARRIED OUT.

OFFICE, No. 4 PEARL STREET, ADRIAN MICH.


A. M. FARNSWORTH PROPRIETOR OF Farnsworth's Hack and Livery Stable.

Particular Attention Paid to Country Routes and First=class Teams.

SOUTH WINTER STREET, ADRIAN, MICH.

 

GEO. M. HOCH. FRED. J. GMAHLING. Hoch & Gmahling, PROPRIETORS OF THE "LEADER" GROCERY

HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING DESIRABLE IN Choice Family Groceries, Provisions, Etc.

No. 14 South Main St., ADRIAN, Mich.


J. W. GUNSOLUS, DEALER IN Flour, Feed, Grain Baled Hay and Straw.

REFERENCES: BARNUM & BAILEY, BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST AND ALL BIG SHOWS.

43 South Main Street, Telephone. ADRIAN, Mich.

 

H. G. SUTTON & CO. SUCCESSORS TO KNAPP & SUTTON. PROPRIETORS OF THE Omnibus, Hack AND Transfer Co.

Have furnished all big shows with first-class country teams the past 20 years.

TELEPHONE NO. 165. OFFICE, Hibbard House Block. BARN, Rear Hurd House. JACKSON, Mich.


Members of the International Bill Posters' Association.

Stevenson & Solomon, CITY Bill Posters

LITHOGRAPH BOARDS A SPECIALTY.

JACKSON, Mich.

Established in 1865, And Still at Your Service.

GEO. W. STEVENSON, "Only a Bill Poster."

 

J. E. McCARTHY, Bill Poster and DISTRIBUTER

MEMBER Associated Bill Posters' Association. Michigan State Bill Posters' Association. The International Association of Distributers.

I make no extra charge for billing in the country.

I also bill Plainwell, population 3,000; Galesburg, 2, 500; nine and twelve miles from Kalamazoo.

Kalamazoo's Population 25,000

Kalamazoo, Mich.


JOEL WATERBURY, Livery

I have furnished all Shows with Teams for Country Routes past Twenty years.

123 and 125 East Water St., Telephone 73, KALAMAZOO, MICH.

 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. E. A. SPINKS, DEALER IN Flour and Feed

REFERENCES: Forepaugh Show, Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, Ringling Bros. Show.

209 WEST WATER STREET.


What We Have and Do.

POPULATION, 20,000; Chicago and Grand Trunk Ry. Shops; two largest Threshing Machine Shops in the United States, and other large factories.

HOTELS.—Williams, Halladay, Hamblin and Commercial.

TWO EXPRESS COMPANIES.—National and American.

FOUR RAILROADS, Michigan Central and branches, Chicago & Grand Trunk, Cincinnati, Jackson & Mackinaw.

BILL BOARDS, 2000 feet and control of all Dead Walls in city, and all covered by Buffalo Bill Show from July to August 7, 1896. Country Billing a specialty. I also have men to do my distributing in a first-class manner. Electric Lights Illuminate Every One of my well=located Bill Boards, really giving the advertiser 24 hours' light on his advertising, or 720 hours every 30-day showing. All work under my personal supervision.

E. R. SMITH, City Bill Poster, Member Bill Posters' Association.

And the ONLY Bill Poster in the City of Battle Creek, Mich.

 

THE J. J. BAIRD BILL POSTING AND ADVERTISING CO.

Bill Posting. Lithographing. Sign Painting. Fence Advertising. Distributing. Country Work.

Members of the Associated Bill Posters' Association.

Estimates Furnished on all kinds of Outdoor Advertising.

CAPACITY OF PLANT, 5,000 SHEETS.

OFFICE, BAIRD'S OPERA HOUSE, LANSING, MICH.

J. A. ELLIS, Manager,


P. E. LACY. HORACE LAPHAM. P. E. LACY & CO. DEALERS IN Grain, Hides, Pelts and Furs, Lime, Cement.

Field Seeds a Specialty. Produce of all Kinds Bought and Sold.

FURNISH ALL SHOWS AND GUARANTEE SATISFACTION.

200 Michigan Ave., East. Lansing, Mich.


W. L. McCLURE, Livery and Sale STABLE

Furnished Teams to all Big Shows for Country Routes the past 15 years. Excellent Service Guaranteed.

111 WASHTENAW STREET, W. ADJOINING HOTEL DOWNEY, LANSING, MICH.

 

J. P. MORAN, LIVERY, HACK, BOARDING AND SALE STABLES

Furnish all Shows with Country Teams

50, 52, and 54 NORTH DIVISION ST. TELEPHONE 324 GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.


ESTABLISHED 1860. GEORGE M. LEONARD, BILL POSTER AND Distributer.

All Boards at Night Illuminated by Electric Light.

REYNOLDS & LEONARD Bill Posters Distributers. Muskegon, Mich. POPULATION, 35,000.

Member Associated Bill Posters' Association. Member Michigan Bill Posters' Association.

NEW OFFICE: HURON STREET. Population, 100,000. GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

 

P. WINTERMUTE PROPRIETOR LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE

Furnished all Big Shows Country Teams for past 20 years.

Office and Stable on Market Street, Fronting Western Avenue. MUSKEGON, Mich.


G. F. Sperry & Co. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Flour, Feed, Hay, Oats Corn.

Furnish all the Big Shows.

AGENTS FOR Pillsbury's Minnesota Patent Flour. The Livonia Salt Mining Co. of New York. Buffalo Gluten Feed. Washburn, Crosby & Co.'s Gold Medal Flour. Detroit Linseed Oil. Meal.

13 East Clay Ave., MUSKEGON, Mich.

 

L. J. CALKINS, Prest. And Mgr. J. C. CALKINS, Sec'y and Treas.

Calkins Mercantile Co. Wholesale and Retail Groceries Dry Goods FLOUR AND FEED

Shows Supplied at Lowest Prices.

BENTON HARBOR, Mich.


GEO. S. KOLB, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL Grocer AND Baker

GERMAN BLOCK, South Main St., GOSHEN, Ind.

 

EVANS BROTHERS, LIVERY Boarding and Sale Stables

First-Class Teams Furnished for Country Routes. We do all the BIG SHOWS routes.

114 SOUTH THIRD ST., GOSHEN, IND.


C. J. ULREY. F. E. POYSER. ULREY & POYSER, JOBBERS OF SPRING AND WINTER WHEAT FLOUR

DEALERS IN Feed, Lime, Cements, Plaster, Salt, &c.

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF GRASS AND FIELD SEEDS

128 North Main Street, GOSHEN, IND.

 

CHARLEY KRUTZ, CITY BILL POSTER

[image]

Roylance

Distributer and Sign Advertiser. THE "HUSTLER."

RESIDENCE, 210 S. Seventh Street, GOSHEN, IND. P. O. Box 746 POPULATION, 10,000.


OLIVER HOUSE

FAULKNOR & McELRATH, Proprietors.

SPECIAL RATES TO ALL LARGE TENT SHOWS.

South Bend, Ind.

 

J. B. TOMS, City Bill Poster and DISTRIBUTER.

MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OF FLOUR PASTE

Own and control 3,500 Lineal Feet of Boards.

SOUTH BEND, IND.


IRELAND AND SON, PROPRIETORS LIVERY, BOARD, SALE AND FEED STABLES

HACKS FOR FUNERALS AND PARTIES A SPECIALTY.

Have furnished Shows Country Teams PAST 23 YEARS

REFERENCES: Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Barnum & Bailey Show. Forepaugh and Sells' Show.

232 North Michigan Street, SOUTH BEND, IND.

 

W. H. BARKER, Buys GRAIN of all kinds. Sells FEED, Baled Hay and Straw

REFERENCE—Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

OFFICE, ELEVATOR AND WAREHOUSE, Old Lake Shore Freight House, Opposite Passenger Depot, SOUTH BEND, IND.


L. NICKEL, Jr., & CO. LOW-PRICED GROCERY AND VIENNA BAKERY

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOR Maltby's Baltimore Oysters, BEST IN THE WORLD.

121 and 123 NORTH MAIN STREET, SOUTH BEND, IND.

 

RUBBER-NECKS.

If you were to ask a resident of any place how many rubber-necks are in his town he would look surprised and answer, "I don't know what a rubber-neck is; I never saw one; I don't believe we have one in town."

If you ask any old showman how many rubber-necks in any town that he has ever showed in he will tell you the exact number of them. If I were to make an estimate I would say that about twenty-five per cent. of the total population of all towns are affected with this disease. The worst feature about the complaint is that a man or woman may be afflicted so bad with this terrible disease that it has become chronic with them and they are not aware they are afflicted with it. The peculiarity of it consists in the strange manner in which it develops itself, the first symptoms of the disease being that a patient cannot sleep the morning the show arrives in town, so he gets up early and gets on the lot as soon as the first wagon is hauled on and stays until the last wagon leaves at night. His staying qualities are well developed. Another peculiarity of the disease is in his being able to stay so long and never spend a cent. The male rubber-neck comes early and stays late; the female rubber-neck comes just after the afternoon show and stays about two hours to look around a little; she is not near so persistent or as big a nuisance as her partner,   the male rubber-neck. The male will follow the stake gang until they go to breakfast, then stand outside the cook tent and look in and see them eat, as though they ate any different than any one else. Then when the doors are opened he will stand outside, size up the crowd, and remark that the show is taking all the money out of the town. He will follow the last wagon off the lot, see it loaded on the train, and go home completely cured of his disease until the next show comes to town, then he will suffer all the symptoms over again; he never misses a chance to rubber a show. There is one thing we like about him, and that is that we have a new one every day; this make him bearable, to a certain extent. When the showman curses his natural enemy and never misses a chance to make his life unpleasant, he is the most persistent rubber-neck we have to deal with.

I have seen our own people go fifteen miles to rubber another show, and I have seen others come the same distance to rubber ours, and both parties go back and tell what a poor lot of stuff the other one has got. The showman knowing more about the business is the most uncharitable critic we have. He knows this, and takes advantage to make himself as big a nuisance as possible. It seems to be the established fact that we will have rubber-necks as long as shows exist, and of the two evils give us the least. Lord deliver us from the showman "rubber-neck."

 

A. F. EARL, LIVERY AND Undertaking

CORNER WASHINGTON AND MICHIGAN STREETS.

EXCELLENT SERVICE FOR COUNTRY ROUTES

MICHIGAN CITY, IND.


A. C. HEITSCHMIDT, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Flour, Feed, Grain BALED HAY, STRAW, ROCK SALT AND ALL KINDS OF GRASS SEEDS.

FURNISHES ALL LARGE SHOWS.

314-316 Michigan St., MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. Telephones:—M. M. 174, Bell 32.


E. F. BAILEY City Bill Poster

OWN AND CONTROL ALL BOARDS IN THE CITY.

Reliable and Prompt Service MICHIGAN CITY, IND.

 

D. BARRETT, Livery Feed and Sale Stable

FIRST-CLASS TEAMS for COUNTRY ROUTES.

422 Van Buren St., JOLIET, Ills. TELEPHONE 208.


S. V. DeLONG. GEO. W. BIEDERMAN.

STONE CITY BILL POSTING CO.

City Bill Posters and Distributers.

All Advertising Promptly Attended To

303 NORTH JOLIET ST., JOLIET, ILL.

 

T. J. COYNE. T. J. BYRON.

COYNE & BYRON, PROPRIETORS OF SPOT CASH FEED STORE

Flour and Feed, Hay and Straw, Bran and Shorts.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.

GOODS HANDLED ON COMMISSION.

Warehouse: 203 WASHINGTON ST., JOLIET, Ill.


Hobbs Grocery House

Groceries, Fruit, Table Luxuries, Etc.

"MONARCH" Canned Goods the Best.

Proprietors WOMEN'S HOME KITCHEN Bakery

Makers of Fine Cake and Bread. Wedding and other Cakes to Order

114 and 116 North Ottawa Street, JOLIET, ILLINOIS.

 

GEO. A. SCHMID CONTRACTOR and Builder.

I erect all new Boards and furnish Lithograph Boards for all large Shows, past 10 years. Prices to suit the times.

OFFICE, MILL and LUMBER YARD, 702 TO 714 E. MAIN STREET, PHONE No. 109. STREATOR, ILL.


CHARLES FINLEN PROPRIETOR OF Livery, Sale and Feed Stables

Excellent Service On Country Routes.

Reference: Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

WEST MAIN STREET, Streator, Ill.

 

BORU MARVIN, City Bill Poster DISTRIBUTER AND PROGRAMMER

PAINTED SIGNS.

Own and Control All Bill Boards.

AURORA, ILL.


HEIDEMANN & SON, PROPRIETORS OF The Stone Mills

FLOUR, FEED, HAY AND OATS.

Cor. Brook and North Sts., ELGIN, ILL.


W. W. HICHCOX. CHAS. P. VAN SICKLE.

HICHCOX & VAN SICKLE, Livery and Boarding Stables

A First-Class Outfit at a Reasonable Price. Hack and Baggage Transfer a Specialty.

113 and 115 New York St., AURORA, ILL. TELEPHONE NO. 50.

 

VIENNA BAKERY

209 East Chicago Street.

BRANCH BAKERY and Luncheon, 110 WEST CHICAGO STREET.

ELGIN, ILL.

H.S. MUETTERTIES, Proprietor.


AUG. SCHEELE, THE GROCER

TAKES CARE OF ALL SHOWS.

Flour and Fruits a Specialty

50 DOUGLAS AVENUE, ELGIN, ILL.

 

30,000 Square Feet of Bill Boards.

RELIABLE AND DEFINITE SERVICE. OWN AND CONTROL ALL BILL BOARDS IN THE CITY

Fred W. Jencks, CITY BILL POSTER

Bill Posting and Distributing. Window Work, Card Tacking, Sample Distributing, Country Work, Etc.

OFFICE, OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, ELGIN, Ills.


S. C. HOAGLAND, Livery, Sale and Express Stables.

Complete Routes Furnished to all Large Shows, and Excellent Service.

212 West Chicago St., ELGIN, Ills. Telephone 106.

 

HENRY RUPERT, DEALER IN FLOUR, FEED, GRAIN BALED HAY AND STRAW, TIMOTHY AND CLOVER SEED, WOOD, LIME, CEMENT AND BRICK.

Reference:—Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show

26 West Main Street, BATTLE CREEK, Mich. TELEPHONE 113.


The Leading Hotel of the City.

Merchants' Hotel

W. D. CALDWELL, Proprietor.

ELGIN, ILLS. 25,000 INHABITANTS.

Special accommodations and favorable rates to the amusement profession.


Geo. H. Robertson, CITY BILL POSTER AND DISTRIBUTER.

Owns and Controls all Bill Boards in the City of DIXON, ILLS.

Prompt attention and good service guaranteed.

 

CHARLES A. DEMENT FIRE-PROOF BRICK LIVERY AND BOARDING Stables

Six excellent Country Routes for all Large Shows. I furnish first-class teams for same past 15 years.

105 and 107 HENNEPIN AVE., DIXON, ILL.


I. B. Countryman Co. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL Groceries

FRESH AND SALT MEATS

DIXON, ILLINOIS.

 

RICHARD WAHLER, City Bill Poster AND DISTRIBUTER.

Orders left at residence or at H. J. Moogk's Drug Store will be promptly attended to.

58 SPRING STREET, FREEPORT, ILL.


J. R. ROSEBRUGH PROPRIETOR Palace Livery.

COUNTRY ROUTES OUR SPECIALTY. First-Class Teams.

Cor. GALENA and MECHANIC STS., Telephone No. 3. FREEPORT, ILL.


GEO. LICHTENBERGER. HENRY LICHTENBERGER.

LICHTENBERGER BROS. DEALERS IN FRESH AND SALT Meats Poultry FISH, GAME, ETC.

IN SEASON.

102 CHICAGO STREET, FREEPORT, ILL.

 

Kingsley's Department Store

GROCERIES DRY GOODS, HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS,

120-122 Stephenson Street, FREEPORT, ILL.


Hotel Brewster

MRS. J. S. GATES, Proprietor.

NEW LARGE SAMPLE ROOMS ON FIRST FLOOR, FINEST IN THE STATE.

REMODELED, REFURNISHED.

Passenger Elevator. Steam Heat.

Freeport, Ill.


JACOB PFENDER, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Flour, Feed, Grain, Salt TIMOTHY AND CLOVER SEED BALED HAY AND STRAW

COR. STEPHENSON AND ADAMS STS., FREEPORT, ILL.


C. C. JONES, BILL POSTING AND DISTRIBUTING

Controls all Boards in the City.

Manager OPERA HOUSE. Rockford, Ill.

 

Cream City Bill Posting Co.

F. FITZGERALD, Manager.

LICENSED CITY BILL POSTERS.

Members' Associated Bill Posters' Association of the United States and Canada.

BILL POSTING AND DISTRIBUTING

We Paint Bulletin Signs.

220 THIRD STREET, (Riverside Printing Co. Building.) MILWAUKEE.


EUGENE CARY & CO., Produce and Commission Merchants

TELEPHONE 460. ORDERS BY TELEPHONE PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Flour, Feed, Baled Hay, Etc.

No. 306 Broadway. MILWAUKEE, WIS.

 

We Know Every "Daub" for 40 Miles Around.

THE BOYNTON LIVERY CO.

Boarding, Livery and Sale Stable

Country Routes for Circuses a Specialty.

You Furnish the Paper and Man, We'll do the rest.

449, 451 and 453 MILWAUKEE STREET, TELEPHONE 22. MILWAUKEE, WIS.


PEOPLE WHO EAT BREAD

Might as well get something appetizing as to eat something that isn't

What's the use of buying a poor article when you can get the BEST for the same money at

The West Baking Co.

Madison, Wis.

 

M. L. NELSON, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN Groceries, Fruits Wines and Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco.

119 EAST MAIN STREET, MADISON, WIS.


H. KLUETER, DEALER IN Flour, Feed and Groceries

SUPPLY ALL LARGE TENT SHOWS

LOWEST MARKET PRICES.

506 EAST WILSON ST. MADISON, WIS.

 

KENTZLER BROS. PROPRIETORS OF City Livery Stable

109 E. DOTY STREET.

Our Teams for Country Routes cannot be Excelled.

ESTABLISHED 1856.

MADISON, WIS.


FREE BUS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS

THE Chick House,

THOS. CHICK.

Electric Cars to all parts of the city pass the door.

ROCKFORD, ILL.


HOTEL MYERS

JANESVILLE, WIS.

Johnson & Donahoe, Proprietors.

A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL. CENTRALLY LOCATED.

HEADQUARTERS FOR THE PROFESSION.

FIRST-CLASS BAR IN CONNECTION.

 

D. RYAN, FIRST-CLASS LIVERY

Country Routes a Specialty.

CARRIAGES FURNISHED FOR WEDDINGS AND PARTIES.

Nos. 21, 23 and 25 SOUTH MAIN ST., JANESVILLE, WIS.


Van Kirk Grocery Co., WHOLESALE and RETAIL GROCERS AND PROVISION DEALERS.

Also Flour, Feed, Hay, Straw and Grain.

No. 12 South River St., JANESVILLE, Wis.

CIRCUSES A SPECIALTY.

 

GEO. M. KEYT & SON, Livery, Boarding and Sale Stable OMNIBUS AND TRANSFER LINE.

Dealers in Hay, Straw and Grain

EXCELLENT SERVICE ON COUNTRY ROUTES.

218 South Wyman St., ROCKFORD, Ill. TELEPHONE 213.


PUSH Your Business. PRINTERS' INK PAYS IF YOU DISPLAY IT RIGHT.

I have the Key to reach 75,000 PEOPLE In Racine and Kenosha Counties.

ADVERTISERS who desire to reach the multitude in a thorough and systematic manner, and who appreciate faithful and judicious work, will communicate with

W. C. TIEDE, Licensed City Bill Poster and Distributer.

325 MAIN STREET. RACINE, Wis.

 

A. McAVOY, LIVERY STABLE

First-class Teams for Country Routes.

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS.

215 FOURTH STREET, Telephone 61. RACINE, WIS.


[image]

BUCKING MUSTANGS


PALACE LIVERY

FRANK L. BESSINGER.

Livery, Boarding and Sale STABLE

Carriages and Sleighs at Lowest Prices. Bus Parties a Specialty

FINEST LIVERY IN THE STATE FOR BIG SHOW COUNTRY ROUTES

TELEPHONE No. 26. SHEBOYGAN, WIS.

  [image]

RIVERSIDE CO. MIL.

E. J. KEMPF BILLPOSTER AND DISTRIBUTER

WINDOW WORK DISTRIBUTING CARD TACKING SAMPLE DISTRIBUTING LOCATING SIGNS COUNTRY WORK ETC., ETC.

OFFICE, 731 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., SHEBOYGAN, WIS.

LICENSED

ALWAYS READY PROPRIETOR OF ALL BILL BOARDS

MEMBER OF THE WISCONSIN STATE BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION AND ASSOCIATED BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA.

Rip Slept for 20 years. Don't You Do the Same. Get this into your "Think Tank" and Send on Your Paper.

ALL WORK DONE PERSONALLY. OFFICE, 731 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., SHEBOYGAN, WIS.

 

Appleton, Wis.

TUESDAY, September 1. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One mile haul to lot. We had opposition here to-day in the shape of a County Fair across the street, but it seemed to do us no harm.

Weather clear all day, but a heavy rain at night, just as the show was closing.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, College avenue, known as Clarke Lot.

Arena, 186 x 405.

Menominee, Mich.

WEDNESDAY, September 2. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. One-quarter mile haul to lot, but the haul was a hard one, as all wagons had to be hook-roped on and off the lot. Louis Canier, a French soldier, closed to-day on account of ill-health. Capt. Jack O'Connor, of White Cloud, Mich., the deaf-mute marksman, was a guest of Miss Annie Oakley to-day. This has been one of the dismal days in show life—it rained all day and was very cold.

Business, big at both performances.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 189 x 415.

Green Bay, Wis.

THURSDAY, September 3. Arrived in town at 3.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. The weather turned very cold to-night—the coldest day of the season. There was the largest concert house this afternoon that we ever had—every reserve seat was taken, and George Fursman smiled as we have never seen him smile before, and even "Pop" Ramsey was pleased.

Business, big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Webster avenue and Polier street.

Arena, 190 x 408.

Stevens' Point, Wis.

FRIDAY, September 4. Arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. One and one quarter mile haul to lot. This is a typical one-horse town, with no street cars, and the worst kind of sandy streets. We had a great hustle to night in order to get the second section out first, as it had to be all loaded and ready to leave town at 10.45, and considering the long haul it was quick work.

Business, big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Fay street and Wisconsin avenue.

Arena, 189 x 363.

 

Centralia, Wis.

SATURDAY, September 5. Instead of waking up at Wausau, as we expected to do this morning, the first section was unceremoniously awakened at 3.30, forty-two miles from Wausau, between the stations of Centralia and Rudolph, and the second section was routed out at Centralia at 4.30 with the startling news that the first section had been wrecked. The second section left Stevens' Point according to programme at 10.45, was taken out to the junction of C., M. & St. P. R. R. and side-tracked until the first section passed. As the first section was going up a grade between Centralia and Rudolph they stalled and cut the train in two, and started with one half of it for Rudolph station, and when the second section came along it was flagged, the conductor gave orders to the engineer to cut his engine loose and take the remaining cars of the first section up the grade to Rudolph, and they had hardly gotten under way when they met the engine of the first part of the first section coming back, and failing to either see or understand signals, they came together with a crash that was almost fatal to the rolling stock of the Wild West Company. Sleeping-cars, flat-cars and wagons all suffered alike—nothing escaped injury. Flat cars Nos. 105, 119, 124, 118 and 114 were left in the ditch as worthless.

Trunk wagon No. 84, side-pole wagon No. 18, canvas wagon No. 16, jack wagon No. 32, and side-show wagon No. 7 were abandoned. The buggies of Manager J. T. McCaddon, Superintendent Anderson, and the light express wagon were a total wreck, and their remains were left in the ditch with the other cars and wagons. It made a pile of wreckage that the oldest time Wild West man had never seen before. Sleeping-cars Nos. 56 and 151 were taken to the Minneapolis shops to be repaired, and sleepers Nos. 53 and 150 were taken to the LaCrosse shops for repairs. The occupants of car No. 150 had a very narrow escape, and that there was no loss of life was a wonder, as the car was almost entirely demolished. The occupants of the car were John McLaughlin, master of transportation, Jake Platt, superintendent of canvas, Ed. Lacey and Thomas McAvoy, and William Welton, superintendent of baggage stock, and assistant Eddie McLaughlin. No one was injured but Jake Platt, who received a badly sprained neck. The track was cleared at 1 P. M, and the first section, or what was then left of it, came back to Centralia, where the first section had laid from 3.30, where a council was held and the Wausau stand abandoned, and orders were issued to go to LaCrosse, Wis., our next stand. We left at 2.30 and arrived at La Crosse (after we had a lay over of four hours at   [image] JACOB PLATT. [image] ED. LACEY.   Tomah) at 11 P. M., with every one worn out from their day's experience. Everything was done for the comfort and pleasure of the men and horses that could possibly be done under the circumstances. The first section had the cook-house wagon taken off and meals set for all, and at Centralia, all people from the second section, numbering about two hundred, were taken to the hotels and restaurants, horses were taken out, watered and fed, and were left out until orders were given to pull out. This is our first experience with a wreck in the two years we have been on the road, and we hope it will be the last.

La Crosse, Wis.

SUNDAY, Sept. 6. We arrived on the lot early this morning, and spent the whole morning looking for trouble and found lots of it, in the shape of damaged wagons, planks, seats, etc. The plank wagon we sent to the wagon shops here to be repaired this morning. Dan Taylor left his evening for Milwaukee to look after the repairs of our damaged cars and wagons. Nothing was put up to-day except horse and cook tents. Frank Butler and Annie Oakley went fishing to-day, but neither of them got a bite.

Weather clear and cool.

MONDAY, Sept. 7. Everything was put up early this morning. All extra seat stuff was forwarded to Minneapolis to await our arrival there next Sunday. Mr. Gardner, of the advance, gave us a call this afternoon. Supt. James P. Anderson stepped off the depot platform to-night and fell into a pile of railroad iron; he will be seen around the camp as a ruin for a few days. Col. Cody was the recipient of a beautiful bouquet of flowers this afternoon from the wife of his old friend, Dr. Frank Powell.

Business big at both performances.

Weather clear and cold.

Lot, State street.

Arena, 188 x 406.

Winona, Minn.

TUESDAY, Sept. 8. Arrived in town at 5 A. M.; unloaded three blocks from the lot. Cowboy John Franz received a bad fall to-day from the bucking horse "Sky Scraper." He remained unconscious for four hours. Joe Esquevel was hurt this afternoon while lassoing wild horses, and he will be seen limping around the camp for a few days.

Business, big at both performances.

Weather fine.

Lot, corner Howard and Market streets.

Arena, 190 x 404.

  [image]

ED. M. SHOWLES.

[image]

PAUL J. STANTON.

 

Eau Clair, Wis.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9. Arrived in town at 7.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot, and most of the way in a bad, sandy road. The weather was most unfavorable to-day, cloudy and threatening all the morning, and in the afternoon it turned cold and a fine rain set in and it kept it up all night. Cowboy John Franz, who was hurt yesterday, was somewhat improved this morning.

Business big in the afternoon, but light at night.

Lot, State and Oxford avenue.

Arena, 184 x 393.

Chippewa Falls, Wis.

THURSDAY, Sept. 10. We only had a twelve-mile run last night, but we got in about our usual time; one engine brought the first section over and went back after the other one; it did not arrive until 6.15 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot and up hill both ways. It was cold and rained hard all the morning. Owing to the size of the town, bad weather, bad roads and a 154-mile run to-night, orders were issued at 9.30 A. M. that only one show would be given. George F. Mitchell, of the Cowboy Band, closed to-day. We were loaded and ready to pull out at 7.45 P. M. As we were about one-half mile from town the train ran over a man, mangling his right foot. He gave his name a J. N. Mackey, of 890 Walnut street, Chicago, Ill. The train backed up and we left him at the depot.

Business fair in the afternoon.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 187 x 356.

Ashland, Wis.

FRIDAY, Sept. 11. We had a good run last night considering the length of it. We got in at 5.30 A. M. One-mile haul to lot. In getting parade out this morning, electric light wagon No. 1 got into a sink hole and it was 11.45 before it was taken out. Abe Laduke made a great hit in the bucking-horse act this afternoon; the first jump his horse made he was thrown on the horse's neck and he hung on and finished his act in this position, while the audience roared with applause. There were about 500 Chippewa Indians visited the show to-day at the afternoon performance. As soon as the performance was over they joined our Indians and held a pow wow and smoked the pipe of peace. This meeting was brought about by Col. W. F. Cody and Capt. W. A. Mercer, government agent in charge of the   [image] PETER J. BROGAN. [image] J. ALLEN DARNABY.   Chippewas. This is the first time in nearly forty years that these two old enemies have met on friendly terms. The first to speak was Chief Anakawad, of the Chippewas; he was followed by Chief Black Bird, Chief Neshogijig and Chief Buffalo. The Sioux were represented by Chief Rocky Bear, Chief Flat Iron, Poor Elk, Black Fox, Lone Bear, Bear Foot. Col. W. F. Cody and Capt. W. A. Mercer also made very appropriate speeches. The meeting was all that could be desired, and the "hatchet" is forever buried between these two tribes, who have been enemies for so many years.

Business big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Weather clear and cold.

Lot, 7th avenue and 18th street.

Arena, 189 X 386.

Duluth, Minn.

SATURDAY, Sept. 12. We arrived in town at 6.30 A. M. One and one-half mile haul to lot. George Goodman, an old Wild West boy, but now manager of the Duluth Press, was a guest of the show to-day. Col. W. F. Cody's sister, Mrs. Whitman, paid the Colonel a visit to-day. The weather was most unfavorable here. There was a thirty mile an hour wind all day, and at night it was by the greatest effort that the canvas was kept up.

Business, big at both performances.

Lot, Superior street and 29th avenue.

Arena, 186 x 391.

Minneapolis, Minn.

SUNDAY, Sept. 13. The Superintendent of the C., St. P., M. & O. road promised to have us in here a 7 A.M., but it was 12 30 when we pulled into the city. One and one-half mile haul to lot. Our big top was not put up to-day, as we needed a lot of repairs, the effect of the Duluth wind.

Weather cloudy and threatening all day.

MONDAY, Sept. 14. Weather looks bad for our opening here. Fine cold rain all the morning. We had a long and wet parade to-day. Major J. M. Burke, W. H. Gardner and M. Coyle were seen around the front to-day reviving acquaintances. Mrs. Wm. McCune, wife of Chief Usher Wm. McCune, came from Omaha to-day to spend a few days with "Billie."

Business, fair in the afternoon, big at night.

  [image]

BELLE CARTER.

[image]

MRS. E. CARTER.

 

TUESDAY, SEPT. 15. Weather bad again to-day, a cold fine rain from the northwest; it kept up all day. Dan Taylor returned from Milwaukee, Wis., with all cars and wagons, etc., that were damaged in the Centralia wreck. Jockey Rider Joe Campbell had his horse fall with him this afternoon in the hurdle race; no injuries sustained, but plenty of mud on the wardrobe.

Business light in the afternoon, good at night.

Lot, 25th street and Blaisdell avenue.

Arena, 192 x 453.

St. Paul, Minn.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. Long haul to lot, three miles. It was 9 A. M. before the last wagon reached there. Weather bad again to-day, cold northwest winds and rain until 12:30 P. M. Dr. Frank Powell (White Beaver), Mayor of La Crosse, and an old-time friend of Col. Cody, gave us a visit to-day. Our arena to-day beats all former records, as it is 278 square feet larger than the one at Milwaukee.

Business, light in the afternoon, good at night.

THURSDAY, Sept. 17. The arena was in bad condition yesterday, but worse to-day; it was now badly cut up and full of soft places and it was hard to work in it and very dangerous. Dr. Frank Powell (White Beaver) was again a guest of the show to-day. Dr. Chauncey Watson, of Colorado, presented Cowboy Jack Venoy with a fine silver cup this afternoon for good horsemanship. Joseph Mayer, proprietor of the Official Programme, paid us a visit to-day. Weather bad again to-day, cold northwest rain all the morning, but it cleared up a little at night. This closes our two-day stands, and I think the working force are glad of it. A piece of paper was picked up over by the stake-and-chain wagon yesterday, which expresses the opinion of the working man on a two days stand.

Business fair at both performances.

Lot, Aurora and University streets.

Arena, 240 x 450.

Give us back the one-day stand,
  Even if the mud is two feet deep,
Where we have a run of 100 miles,
  And plenty of time to sleep.

Where we get in town at 6 o'clock
  And are early on the ground,
We have our work all done by noon,
  And can quit this "dubbing" around.

  [image]

JOHN McLAUGHLIN.

[image]

Courier Co.

JOHN K. STACK.

 

Mankato, Minn.

FRIDAY, Sept. 18. Arrived in town at 5 A. M. One-mile haul to the lot. Weather very unfavorable, cloudy and threatening all day, with high wind, and turned very cold at night. Wm. Sweeney, Leader of the Cowboy Band, went hunting this afternoon, and as Schaffer, of Schaffer and Clarke, says, "shot a rabbit with his rusty gun." This is the first hunt of the season. Pedro Esqueval received a fall this afternoon; it resulted in a sprained shoulder.

This town has a population of 12,000 and no street cars.

Business, big in the afternoon, fair at night.

Lot, Main street, C., St. P., M. & O. R. R.

Arena, 186 x 359.

Sheldon, Iowa.

SATURDAY, Sept. 19. Arrived in town at 7 A. M. A good run and a long one, 126 miles. We had one happy man this morning. J. P. Anderson had his hay-fever cured by the frost this morning, from which he has been suffering since August 12th. We had two hunting parties this afternoon, Wm. Sweeney, Johnnie Baker, Annie Oakley and Frank Butler. They shot six prairie chicken and one rabbit. The other party was Manager McCaddon and Fred Hutchinson; they went out for big game and came back without anything.

Weather fine to-day, but turned very cold towards night.

This town has 1,800 inhabitants and no street cars.

Business, big in the afternoon, but light at night.

Lot, foot of third street.

Arena, 187 x 351.

Sioux Falls, S. D.

SUNDAY, September 20. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. Three-mile haul to lot and all across country roads. We were never so far from town or car service as we will be here. The street-car system consists of three miles of mule railroad with one car, consequently the trips average one an hour, and it does not run within one mile of the Fair Grounds, where we are located. Manager J. T. McCaddon, Fred Hutchinson, Annie Oakley, Frank Butler and William Sweeney went hunting to-day and came back with one prairie chicken, one jack rabbit and a duck. Big-top was not put up to-day.

Weather clear and cool and very windy. We found one-half inch ice this morning.

  [image]

W. G. HATCH.

[image]

HARRY GRAY.

 

MONDAY, September 21. We are having bad show weather to-day; it tried to snow all morning but cleared off a little this afternoon. We gave a long parade this morning and a lonesome one it was; about one and one-half miles before we got into the city limits. As this was the opening day of the Fair the grounds were thrown open to the public free for the benefit of the show. The Annex opened to a twenty-five cent admission and a very good business this morning. Dr. Carver was a guest of the show this evening.

Business big in the afternoon, light at night.

Weather cloudy and threatening.

Lot, Fair Grounds.

Arena, 188 x 405.

Sioux City, Ia.

TUESDAY, September 22. We came into town in three sections last night, last section arriving at 7.15 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot, which was small, and we were much crowded for room. The parade was long and over the roughest kind of streets. Dan Taylor went to Omaha last evening and returned to night.

There is the toughest kind of times in this town, but business was good at both performances.

Weather fine.

Lot, Fourth and Missouri streets.

Arena, 185 x 364.

Cherokee, Ia.

WEDNESDAY, September 23. Arrived in town at 4 A. M. One-half mile haul to lot. This is the most ideal lot we have been on this season. Plenty of room and convenient to town, which makes it desirable, as there is no street car system. Manager J. T. McCaddon and Fred Hutchinson went hunting again this afternoon and came back with one rabbit. You must not get this rabbit mixed with the one they got at Sioux Falls; it is another rabbit altogether.

Business big in the afternoon but light at night.

Lot, Race Track.

Arena, 190 x 358.

Fort Dodge, Ia.

THURSDAY, September 24. Arrived in town at 6 30 A. M. One-mile haul to lot. We are located a long way out and the weather unfavorable. Cold   [image] HARRY SPEIGLE. [image] JOHN D. TIPPETTS.   west wind all day; rain at 10 A. M. and again at 9.30 P. M. No street cars here.

Business big in the afternoon, light at night.

Lot, Fifth avenue and Eighteenth street (Williams Estate).

Arena, 187 x 368.

Mason City, Ia.

FRIDAY, September 25. We came in in three sections this morning; last section arrived at 6 A. M. Three-block haul to lot, but one and one-quarter mile haul to the runs at night. Fred Hadie, Arabian acrobat, was severely hurt on a lance as the parade returned this morning; he was taken to the car. Reserve seat stringer wagon No. 20 went through a culvert this morning; it had to be unloaded and jacked out. No street cars in this town.

Business big in the afternoon, light at night.

Weather clear and cool.

Lot, Ninth and Monroe streets.

Arena, 182 x 419.

Waterloo, Ia.

SATURDAY, September 26. Arrived in town at 6 A. M. One-half mile haul to the lot. Eighty-six lengths of blue seats were put up to-day and that was none too many, as every seat was taken and many had to stand up or sit on the grass. A hunting party this afternoon again was organized with the usual results, one jack rabbit and a few pigeons, and the whole party came very near getting left seven miles out in the country, as they lost the wagon that took them out. Weather was unfavorable again to-day; cold northwest wind with rain in the morning. Third Assistant Superintendent of Canvas Thomas McAvoy was kicked badly by one of the horses to-night.

Business, full house in the afternoon and good at night.

Lot, Lime and Bardey streets (I. C. R. R. lot), East Waterloo.

Arena, 182 x 398.

Dubuque, Ia.

SUNDAY, September 27. Arrived in town at 5.30 A. M. Three and one-half mile haul to lot. No canvas was put up to-day, but the usual patching was going on all the morning. Up to date the season has been remarkable for the bad weather. We have had 162 days out; 52 rainy days, 19 threatening days, 18 cloudy days, 71 clear days. There   [image] CONFECTIONERY DEPARTMENT.   has been five shows missed: Lima, Ohio, one; Muskegon, Mich., one; Wausau, Wis., two, and Chippewa Falls, Wis., one. Deaths in the camp two, Salem Nassar and Edward Fletcher. Towns with no street cars in, 14; horse cars, 4; all the rest were equipped with electric cars.

Weather fine.

Lot, Linehan Park.

Arena, 144 x 450.

  • Monday, September 28, Dubuque, Ia.
  • Tuesday, September 29, Clinton, Ia.
  • Wednesday, September 30, Cedar Rapids, Ia.
  • Thursday, October 1, Muscatine, Ia.
  • Friday, October 2, Ottumwa, Ia.
  • Saturday, October 3, Oskaloosa, Ia.
  • Sunday, October 4, Des Moines, Ia.
  • Monday, October 5, Des Moines, Ia.
  • Tuesday, October 6, Marshalltown, Ia.
  • Wednesday, October 7, Boone, Ia.
  • Thursday, October 8, Carroll, Ia.
  • Friday, October 9, Council Bluffs, Ia.
  • Saturday, October 10, Omaha, Neb.
  • Sunday, October 11, North Platte, Neb.
  • Monday, October 12, North Platte, Neb.
  • Tuesday, October 13, Hastings, Neb.
  • Wednesday, October 14, Lincoln, Neb.
  • Thursday, October 15, Beatrice, Neb.
  • Friday, October 16, St. Joseph, Mo.
  • Saturday, October 17, Leavenworth, Kan.
  • Sunday, October 18, Kansas City, Mo.
  • Monday, October 19, Kansas City, Mo.
  • Tuesday, October 20, Kansas City, Mo.
  • Wednesday, October 21, Topeka, Kans.
  • Thursday, October 22, Fort Scott, Kans.
  • Friday, October 23, Sedalia, Mo.
  • Saturday, October 24, Moberly, Mo.
  • "HOME, SWEET HOME."
 

WM. COMERFORD. W. O. CLARK.

Comerford & Clark, DEALERS AND JOBBERS IN FLOUR, FEED, CORN and OATS Salt, Oil Meal, Hay, Straw, AND ALL KINDS OF SEED.

TELEPHONE 162. 623 Morrison Street, APPLETON, Wis.


FRANK WRIGHT, PROPRIETOR OF Livery SALE AND BOARDING Stable.

REGULAR HACK LINE, AND EXCELLENT TEAMS FOR COUNTRY ROUTES.

Cor. Morrison & Edward Sts. APPLETON, WIS.

 

S. S. H. BARNHART, City Bill Poster and Distributer

APPLETON, WIS.

CONTROLS PRINCIPAL BOARDS IN THE CITY.

MEMBER OF THE INTERSTATE BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION.


RYAN & CARROLL GROCERS.

NO. 851 COLLEGE AVENUE, APPLETON, Wis.


DAVID BARCLAY DEALER,

MENOMINEE, MICH SURREYS SLEIGHS CARTS WAGONS BUGGIES PHAETONS

Carriages and Sleighs FOR SALE.

LIVERY STABLE AND BUS LINE

Furnishes Teams for all Big Shows.

DAVID BARCLAY, PROPRIETOR.

MENOMINEE, Mich.

 

JOHN B. HERBERT, Bill Poster and Distributer

MENOMINEE AND MARINETTE

CONTROLS THE BEST LOCATIONS IN BOTH CITIES.

Residence, 1416 Holmes Ave., MENOMINEE, MICH.

Member of State Association of Bill Posters, Wisconsin.


H. P. SCHMIDT'S Steam Bakery

1113 CARPENTER ST., Menominee, Mich.


LYON BROTHERS & CO. Commission Merchants

And Dealers in FARM PRODUCE. Also Dealers in Hay, Straw and Grain, Etc.

1106 MAIN STREET, Menominee, Mich.

General Merchandise Store, STURGEON BAY, WIS.

REFERENCE, BUFFALO BILL'S SHOW.

 

P. McCORMICK. D. W. FLATLEY.

McCORMICK & FLATLEY, WHOLESALE DEALERS IN Hay, Oates, Flour, Feed GENERAL PRODUCE, COAL, WOOD.

DOCKS AND WAREHOUSES, 220=230 S. Washington St., GREEN BAY, WIS.

ELEVATOR ON C. M. & ST. P. TRACK.


F. SNYDER, Livery and Exchange Stables

Country Routes Promptly Attended To.

215 N. ADAMS STREET, GREEN BAY, WIS.


E. M. COPPS & CO.,

DEALERS IN Flour, Feed HAY, OATS, COAL, ETC.

Office, 120 Clark Street, Stevens Point, Wis.

Refers to BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST SHOW.


R. B. FINCH PROPRIETOR City Livery Stable

Also proprietor City Hack and Baggage Line. Always ready to furnish large shows with first-class Teams for Country Routes.

Cor. Brown and Third Sts., STEVENS POINT, WIS.

 

A. D. McCULLOCH CO., LTD.

Druggists AND Grocers

STEVENS POINT, WIS.


AUGUST ERICKSON & CO., CITY BILL POSTERS

Distributing, Card Tacking and Country Work.

Own and Control over 30,000 Sq. Ft. of Boards.

Members of Associated Bill Posters' Association of U. S. and Canada.

POPULATION OF CITY, 35,000.

Office, 331 Pearl St.,LA CROSSE, WIS.


A. GRAMS & SONS PROPRIETORS OF Morning Star Mills

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN FLOUR AND FEED

218, 220, 222 SOUTH FRONT STREET, LA CROSSE, WIS.


HENRY WERNER, CITY BILL POSTER and Distributer.

Owns and controls over 5,000 feet Bill Boards. Prominent locations. Especially adapted for all Large Shows.

WINONA, MINN.

 

F. M. WHITNEY Model Grocery,

COR. FOURTH AND CENTER STS.,

WINONA, MINN.


CHAS. WESTMAN, BOSTON BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY

Fresh Bread, Biscuits, Crackers, Plain and Fancy Cakes.

Third St. bet. Walnut and Market, WINONA, MINN.


JOHN WINKELS & CO. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN Fresh and Salt MEATS Game, Poultry, Etc.,

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SHOWS, STEAMBOAT AND MILITARY CONTRACTS.

Cor. SECOND AND LAFAYETTE STREETS, WINONA, MINN.

 

KARL STUSSY CITY Bill Poster

EAU CLAIRE, Wis.

MEMBER OF THE Wisconsin State Bill Posters' Association.

PROPRIETOR OF ALL BILL BOARDS Bill Posting, Window Work, Distributing, Card Tacking, Sample Distributing, Locating Signs, Country Work, Etc.


W. S. MASON, WHOLESALE Grain, Flour HAY and PRODUCE.

General Office, Store and Cold Storage Building,

315 and 317 Eau Claire St. EAU CLAIRE, Wis.

I furnish all the Large Shows at the Lowest Market Prices.

 

J. M. SIGNOR, Livery, Feed. Sale Stable.

SOUTH RIVER ST., EAU CLAIRE, Wis.

FURNISH ALL LARGE SHOWS

SPLENDID TURN-OUTS FOR COUNTRY ROUTES.


Remodeled Throughout. Steam Heat. Elegant New Sample Rooms. Finest in the West. "JUST LIKE HOME."

Eau Claire House

R. E. PARKINSON, PROPRIETOR. C. J. FRISWOLD, HEAD CLERK.

Cor. Barstow & Eau Claire Sts., EAU CLAIRE, Wis.

Rates $2.00 and $2.50 per day.


NEATNESS. PROMPTNESS. DISPATCH.

DOR SMITH'S Bakery.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Manufacturer of Plain and Fancy Bread and Cakes. Particular Attention given to Mail Orders. Wedding and Party Cakes a Specialty. Ice Creams, Ices, etc., to order.

REMEMBER THE PLACE:

314 N. Barstow St., EAU CLAIRE, Wis. TELEPHONE NO. 41.

 

ROBT. B. CLARK. M. N. TAYLOR.

CLARK & TAYLOR, DEALERS AND SHIPPERS Grain, Hay, Potatoes FLOUR AND FEED.

Feed Furnished to all Shows. Lowest Markets Rates.

AGENTS FOR ADAMANT WALL PLASTER

Grain and Potato Warehouses Albertville. Chippewa Falls.

General Store, ALBERTVILLE.

Chippewa Falls, Wis.

Reference, Buffalo Bill's Wild West Shows.


[image]

A. Hoen & Co. Baltimore Md.

BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST.

 

F. M. McGUIRE, Proprietor of Livery and Sale Stable CITY OMNIBUS LINE.

COUNTRY ROUTES A SPECIALTY.

13, 15, AND 17 GRAND AVE., Telephone No. 7. Chippewa Falls, Wis.


The New Stanley

J. H. WADE, Proprietor.

Special Rates to the Traveling Shows.

CHIPPEWA FALLS, WIS.

REFERENCE.—BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST AND ALL LARGE SHOWS.


MONAT & HANZLIK, Groceries

FRUITS, FLOUR AND FEED.

219 BRIDGE STREET, Telephone 66. Chippewa Falls, Wis.


A. BIGLER, City Bakery

BREAD, CAKES AND PIES CONSTANTLY ON HAND.

302 Bay Street, Chippewa Falls, Wis.

 

W. J. ARMSTRONG PROPRIETOR OF Ashland Transfer and Bus Line

LIVERY, BOARDING AND SALE STABLE

Contracting and Heavy Teaming.

206-208 SECOND AVENUE WEST, Telephone No. 53. ASHLAND, WIS.


W. D. KUHN & BRO. Proprietors Grand Opera House. LICENSED CITY BILL POSTERS

BILL POSTING AND DISTRIBUTING of Advertising Matter. 1,750 lineal feet of Boards in the most prominent parts of the city.

Membership in the Wisconsin State Bill Posters' Union and International Bill Posters' Association.

JOHN MIES, MANAGER.

ASHLAND WIS.


HANSON BROS. DEALERS IN HAY AND GRAIN FLOUR AND FEED,

WAREHOUSES AT HAMMOND, WIS.

412 SECOND STREET EAST, ASHLAND WIS.

 

J. N. GORDON CITY BAKERY

ALL KINDS OF CAKES MADE ON SHORT NOTICE. Wedding Cakes TRIMMED IN THE LATEST STYLE.

ASHLAND, WIS.


THOS. SULLIVAN & CO. DEALERS IN STAPLE AND FANCY Groceries AND Provisions

KNIGHT BLOCK, TELEPHONE 31. ASHLAND, WIS.

 

Duluth Bill Posting Co. BILL POSTING AND DISTRIBUTING

The Lyceum Theatre Programme.

Controlling upwards of 5,000 Lineal Feet of Excellently Located Bill Boards.

ROOM 1, THE LYCEUM, Duluth, Minn.

F. J. MARSH, Manager.


GRAY BROTHERS, Bakers AND CONFECTIONERS ICE CREAM AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.

NO. 13 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. Duluth, Minn.


Established 1878. Incorporated 1889.

THE J. R. CLARK CO., Manufacturers of Wooden Specialties Boxes, Ladders, and Lithograph Boards.

Nicollet Island. Minneapolis, Minn.

 

M. WHITCOMB & CO., WHOLESALE DEALERS IN Oats, Corn GROUND FEED, BALED HAY AND STRAW.

128-130 Fourth Street, N., MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.

REFERENCE,—Buffalo Bill's Wild West Shows.


NICK RONNER, LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE.

A. D. T. Hack and Coupe Line.

COUNTRY ROUTES A SPECIALTY.

16 WASHINGTON AVE., North, Telephone 421. Minneapolis, Minn.

 

D. W. BERRY, GENERAL Flour MERCHANT

Agent for BERRY BROS. BEST Flour.

Lyon Rock Salt, Grains, Mill Feed, Graham Flour, Polted Corn Meal and Baled Hay.

373 EAST SEVENTH STREET, Telephone 1525. ST. PAUL, MINN.


M. F. BRENNAN, Prop. E. W. WALLACE, Mgr.

Brennan's Livery, LIVERY, SALE AND BOARDING STABLE

482-484 St. Peter Street. Bet. NINTH AND EXCHANGE STS. TELEPHONE 133-3 St. Paul, Minn.


C H. GRIEBEL, Jr. ONLY City Bill Poster and Distributer

Member of the Associated Bill Posting Association of United States and Canada. Sec. and Treas. Minnesota State Bill Posters' Ass'n.

I DO ALL KINDS OF ADVERTISING

Such as Bill Posting, Sign Tacking, Distributing of all kinds, etc. Contracts made for different towns. Write for terms.

209 SOUTH FRONT ST., MANKATO, MINN.


G. M. PHILLIPS & SON, PROPRIETORS OF METROPOLITAN LIVERY

Hack, Sale and Boarding Stables

Parties conveyed to all parts of the country, and private Hack Calls a specialty.

117 TO 123 E. WALNUT STREET, One Block from "THE SAULPAUGH." MANKATO, MINN.

 

HENRY WEBER, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Hay, Grain and Flour

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S SHOW.

MARSHALLTOWN. Iowa.


FRANK FRISBEE, SUCCESSOR TO FRISBEE BROS. Pioneer Livery BUS AND TRANSFER LINE.

Prompt attention to all Shows. Furnishing all Country Routes past 21 Years.

BRICK BARN REAR OF ARLINGTON, SHELDON, IOWA.


JOHN WALTON, Bill Poster, Circular Distributer

I will place all kinds of Advertising Matter into the hands of the buying class Signs and Show Cards Tacked.

POPULATION O'Brien County, 15,000. City 3,000.

References Furnished.

Box 113 SHELDON, IOWA.


H. E. PARKER, PROPRIETOR OF THE City Flour and Feed Store

FANCY BRANDS OF FLOUR Wholesale and Retail Dealer in GRAIN, COAL AND WOOD.

225 AND 227 North Main Ave. SIOUX FALLS, S. D.

 

SIOUX FALLS BILL POSTING COMPANY.

Population of City, 15,000.

1,500 Feet of Boards along the Business Center.

OSCAR L. SOLIE, MANAGER.

CITY Bill Posters and DISTRIBUTERS.

OUT DOOR ADVERTISING OF ALL KINDS

Correspondence Solicited when Visiting this Section.

ADDRESS OSCAR L. SOLIE, SIOUX FALLS, SO. DAKOTA.


SELZER'S Palace Livery Stable

TELEPHONE 163.

Nothing but the Best Teams for Country Routes.

506-508 Douglas St., SIOUX CITY, Iowa.


E. A. CONWAY, Flour, Grain, Coal

BALED HAY AND BALE TIES.

411 Douglas Street. SIOUX CITY, Iowa.

 

Sioux City Bill Posting and Advertising Company,

WE ARE RELIABLE.

A. B. BEALL, Sole Owner.

Only Poster and Distributer in the City.

(Licensed)

Member Associated Bill Posters' Association of the United States and Canada. Member International Association of Distributers.

BILL POSTING

WE GUARANTEE SHOWING AND WORK. 4000 lineal feet bill boards capped and stripped, and in first-class condition, occupying every desirable site and thoroughly covering the city. SPECIAL.--100 3-sheet boards. adjoining and adjacent to grocery stores.

DISTRIBUTING

We make a specialty of distributing at lowest rates. All our work is done by MEN and we PAY for men's services.

SIOUX CITY, IOWA.


WEART & LYSAGHT, Dealers in Lumber

SHINGLES, LATH, WINDOWS, DOORS, POSTS, POLES, Etc.

We erect all New Bill Boards, and manufacture Lithograph Boards FOR ALL SHOWS.

CHEROKEE, IOWA.


R. J. KIDDER, Dealer in Fine Groceries

HAY, STRAW, GRAIN, FEED OF ALL KINDS

Maple Street, Near Raymond House, CHEROKEE, IOWA.

 

WM. P. Dermer, City Bill Poster AND DISTRIBUTER.

1,500 Lineal Feet Bill Boards, all in Prominent Locations.

FORT DODGE, IOWA. POPULATION, 10,000.


W. H. H. COLBY. CHAS. COLBY.

COLBY BROS., PROPRIETORS OF Mineral City Livery

Always Furnish Shows with First-class Teams for Country Routes.

NORTH SIDE OF PUBLIC SQUARE, Fort Dodge, Iowa.

 

CADWELL & KOTCHELL CO. CITY Bus and Dray Line LIVERY AND FEED STABLE.

We Furnish all Shows Teams for Country Routes.

NO. 116 EAST SIXTH STREET, MASON CITY, IOWA.


Parker's Opera House

H. G. & A. T. PARKER, Proprietors.

A. T. PARKER, MANAGER.

Corner Main and 6th Sts., opposite Park, Mason City Iowa.

OWNS AND CONTROLS ALL BILL BOARDS.

1,500 FEET BOARDS. ALL PROMINENT LOCATIONS.

 

J. W. Klinefelter & Son, Proprietors Park Avenue Livery AND FEED STABLE.

No. 216 West Park Avenue, TELEPHONE No. 75 Waterloo, Iowa.

We Furnish Livery to all Large Shows.


John M. Byrne. Joseph T. Byrne. Frank J. Byrne.

BYRNE BROS., Leaders of Styles in Livery

Excellent Service to Country Routes for all Large Shows.

Orders taken for Artesian Well Water.

COR. 9TH AND IOWA STREETS. COR. 7TH AND LOCUST STREETS. Dubuque, Iowa.


Brown's Opera House.

C. F. BROWN, Manager. LICENSED Bill Poster

Owns and Controls all the Billing Privileges.

OVER 1,500 LINEAL FEET OF BILL BOARDS.

POPULATION, 10,000.

Waterloo, Iowa.

 

Grand Opera House Co.

1896 SEVENTH SEASON 1897

Costing $100,000

Opened August 14, 1890.

WM. T. ROEHL, Manager.

Bill Posting and Distributing. Controlling 1,100 Lineal Feet Bill Boards.

DUBUQUE, Iowa.

Population, 40,000. Seating Capacity, 1,200.

Ground Floor. Finest Theatre In the Hawkeye State.

SIZE OF STAGE: 66 2-3 feet wide inside, wall to wall. 60 feet to Rigging Loft. 35 feet Curtain Opening. 36 feet Depth of Stage. 23 1-2 feet under Fly Galleries. Width between Girders, 38 feet.


J. B. Schroeder & Co. Commission Merchants

COAL AND WOOD.

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST SHOW.

Jobbers and Dealers in FLOUR, FEED, GRAIN, BALED HAY AND STRAW, AND ALL KINDS SALT, APPLES, POTATOES, ONIONS AND CABBAGE.

COR. EIGHTH AND WHITE STREETS, Telephone 267. DUBUQUE, IOWA.

 

E. G. FENLON, WHOLESALE DEALER IN Flour, Grain, Hay COAL AND WOOD.

Agent for Packets JO LONG AND DOUGLAS BOARDMAN.

A FULL LINE OF GRASS SEEDS.

132 FIFTH AVENUE, Clinton, Iowa.

References: Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Barnum & Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth. Forepaugh & Sells' Shows.


TATE AND SLOPPY City Bill Posters.

Quick Services Rendered. Satisfaction Guaranteed.

CLINTON, Iowa.

POPULATION OF CLINTON, 25,000.

License Reasonable. Good Opera House.

Spacious Circus Grounds.

We own over 2000 feet of Bill Boards, and control all dead walls in the city.

Several Hundred One-sheet Boards.

A competent and reliable Corps of Distributors.

 

E. A. HUGHES, Livery And BOARDING STABLES.

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO COUNTRY ROUTES

114, 116, 118 FIFTH AVENUE, Clinton, Iowa.


I. A. LYTLE, Livery, Feed and Sale Stable

Delivery Made at All Hours and Satisfaction Guaranteed. The Best Rigs Always on Hand and Furnished at all Hours. Country Routes a Specialty.

Nos. 310-312 South Second St.,

Telephone No. 97 CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA.


W. KARBAN, DEALER IN Flour, Feed, Baled Hay, Straw

CHOICE WESTERN HAY IN TON OR CAR LOTS.

No. 123 THIRD AVENUE, Telephone No. 314. Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

 

L. N. SCOTT, Member of International Bill Posters' Association. City Bill Poster.

Commercial Posting, Distributing and Advertising Signs

A SPECIALTY.

Own and Control in this City 100,000 Square Feet of Bill Boards, All in the most prominent locations in the City.

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. Can give 30, 60, or 90 Days of Showing.

FOR RATES AND RELIABLE WORK, CALL ON OR ADDRESS, L. N. SCOTT, Metropolitan Opera House, ST. PAUL, MINN.

Also Own and Control DULUTH BILL POSTING CO., DULUTH, MINN.

 

CHAS. H. JONES. J. M. JAMISON.

JONES & JAMISON, WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FLOUR, CORN MEAL AND FEED.

424-426 East Second Street, MUSCATINE, IOWA.

WE FURNISH ALL LARGE SHOWS.

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST, AND BARNUM & BAILEY GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH.


Frank Bowman, LIVERY AND EXPRESS LINE

Fine Turn-Outs, Hacks and Private Rigs.

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO FURNISHING FIRST-CLASS TEAMS FOR COUNTRY ROUTES.

TELEPHONE No. 104. East Front Street, MUSCATINE, IOWA.

 

"YOU STICK TO ME, I'LL STICK TO YOU."

S. B. PATTERSON, City Bill Poster

Own and Control 2,200 feet of BILL BOARDS; HAVE OPTIONS ON 3,000 feet more of BOARD ROOM.

CIRCUS PEOPLE ALWAYS TREATED SQUARE.

Office, Grand Opera House, OTTUMWA, IOWA.


W. S. CRIPS & BRO., Livery and Feed Stable

TRANSFER LINE.

TELEPHONE 134.

TERMS REASONABLE. COUNTRY ROUTES A SPECIALTY.

Cor. Commercial and Green Streets, OTTUMWA, IOWA.


Jones and Buchanan, DEALERS IN FLOUR, FEED, GRAIN, Etc.

120-122 EAST SECOND ST., OTTUMWA, IOWA.

 

GEO. H. CARLON. CHAS. H. CARLON.

GEO. H. CARLON & SON, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN FLOUR, FEED, MEAL, BALED HAY & STRAW, GRAIN, COAL, WOOD.

Telephone No. 99. 224 High Ave. East, OSKALOOSA, IOWA.


W. A. McNEILL, President and Gen. Manager. J. F. McNEILL, Sec'y and Treasurer. GEORGE HUFFORD, Supt. Of Dray Dept. GRIER HUFFORD and TOM SHIPLEY, Foremen.

Oskaloosa Livery and Transfer Company.

COUNTRY ROUTES AND TRANSFER WORK A SPECIALTY.

REFERENCE: Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

OSKALOOSA, IOWA.

 

L. J. WELLS, Livery Hack and 'Bus Line.

Have Furnished Teams for the Country Routes the past 25 years, for all the Tent Shows.

STABLES 119 FOURTH STREET. NINTH AND MULBERRY. MAIN OFFICE, 119 FOURTH STREET., DES MOINES, IOWA. TELEPHONE 97.


MARTIN BROS., WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Dealers in HAY, FLOUR, FEED, &c.

Baled Hay and Straw a Specialty.

TELEPHONE 609. 900 WEST WALNUT ST., DES MOINES, IOWA.


Foster's AND The Grand OPERA HOUSES.

Own and Control 4,000 lineal feet of Bill Boards—Choice Locations.

WM. FOSTER, Proprietor.

DES MOINES, IOWA.

 

Scheeler Bros., LIVERY 'BUS, BAGGAGE AND Boarding Stables.

COUNTRY ROUTES A SPECIALTY.

Cor. Center and State Sts.,

MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA.


"Of Course There Are Others," BUT NO BILL POSTING CO. HAVE THE PRIVILEGES I HAVE.

When you contract with me to do your advertising, you can depend on your Paper staying on the boards unmolested. I have 1,500 feet of first-class BILL BOARDS.

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.

WILBUR H. EVANS,

CITY BILL POSTER,

MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA.

 

JORDAN AND BRADY, LIVERY AND FEED COAL AND WOOD YARD.

816 Keeler Street.

WE FURNISH ALL BIG SHOWS WITH COUNTRY ROUTE TEAMS AND FEED.

REFERENCE: BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST SHOW.

Boone, IOWA.


MRS. KATE HALL, PROPRIETRESS. JAMES H. BLACK, MANAGER.

New Butler House.

Newly Refurnished. New Management.

BOONE, IOWA.


J. F. SCHUMACHER, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN FLOUR, FEED AND PRODUCE.

Refer to Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

Court & Fifth Sts., CARROLL, IOWA.

 

WE ERECT ALL New Bill Boards AND MANUFACTURE Lithograph Boards FOR ALL TENTED SHOWS.

L. L. THOMAS City Bill Poster

YARDS AT C. & N. W. R. R.: CARROLL, HALBUR, BREDA, ARCADIA, AUBURN, CUSHING, KINGSLEY, GALVA, PIERSON, LAKE CITY, CORRECTIONVILLE.

C., M. & St. P. R. R.: MANNING, COON RAPIDS, TEMPLETON, DEDHAM.

V. HINRICHS, MANAGER BRANCH YARDS,

General Office at CARROLL, IOWA.


THE COUNCIL BLUFFS BILL POSTING Distributing and Advertising Agency.

We Control All Bill Boards in the City. Can give Options on Circus Lots, Licenses, Etc. All 30-Day Work promptly put up and protected.

Rooms 4 & 5, Dohany's Theatre Building, COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa.

JOHN DOHANY, Jr.

Member of the Bill Posters' Association of the United States and Canada.

 

WILLIAM WELCH, DEALER IN Anthracite, Bituminous, Smithing COAL AND MISSOURI WOOD.

COAL OFFICE, 615 South Main St. Telephone 93.

Proprietor of Hack and Transfer Line

Office, No. 8 Main Street. Telephone 128. Barn Telephone 286.

Passengers and Baggage Transferred to and from all Trains, Hotels, and Private Residences.

COUNCILS BLUFFS, Iowa.

SPECIAL RATES given to all Theatrical Troupes, and Country Routes for all Big Shows.


T. J. Shugart. C. G. OUREN.

Shugart & Ouren, MASONIC TEMPLE, DEALERS IN HAY, GRAIN, AND FLOUR.

Clovers,Timothy, Blue Grass, Red Top, Orchard Grass, Millet VEGETABLE AND FLOWER SEEDS.

REFERENCE, BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST SHOW

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa.

 

USE ROBINSON'S CIPHER. INCORPORATED.

WESTERN Hay and Grain Co.

A. H. SNYDER, MANAGER.

HAY, GRAIN, AND MILL STUFFS.

WESTERN AGENTS FOR THE OMAHA HAY PRESS

1515-17-19 BURT STREET, OMAHA, Neb.


N. E. DILLRANCE, LIVERY BOARDING AND SALE STABLE

I furnish all large shows with country route rigs—past 15 years—with first-class teams.

TELEPHONE 804. 414 South 17th St., OMAHA, Neb.

 

M. E. MULVIHILL LICENSED City Bill Poster and General Advertiser.

WE ENLIGHTEN THE WORLD.

OMAHA, Neb. SOUTH OMAHA, Neb.

Controlling Over 10,000 Lineal Feet of BILL BOARDS in Prominent Locations.

Office, 1512 Harney St., OMAHA, Neb.

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA.


PALACE LIVERY

[image]

Feed and Sale Stable

HALF BLOCK EAST OF DEPOT, FRONT STREET.

CHARGES RESONABLE. OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.

NORTH PLATTE, NEB.

GOOD RIGS ALWAYS ON HAND.

J. A. DELAY, Prop.

 

JAMES McMICHAEL, CARPENTER AND BUILDER

Bill Boards Erected. Furnish Lithograph Boards. Job Work Promptly and Neatly Executed with Dispatch.

ESTIMATES FURNISHED.

Shop on Front Street, One Door West of McDonald's Bank. NORTH PLATTE, Neb.


J. S. CRAIG, LICENSED BILL POSTER

Residence, 319 Lexington Ave., HASTINGS, Neb.

POPULATION 15,000.

Tacking, Bill Posting, Distributing and Advertising, Own and Control all Boards and Privileges.

20,000 SQUARE FEET OF BOARDS.


SPRENGER & SON, PROPRIETORS CITY LIVERY, FEED AND BOARDING STABLE

Handsome Turn-outs on Short Notice. First-Class Teams for Country Routes. City and Commercial Trade a Specialty.

Cor. Bellevue Ave. & Second St., HASTINGS, Neb. TELEPHONE NO. 186.

 

D. SHOLLENBERGER. E. G. COLLINS.

Shollenberger & Collins, EAST END Livery Stables

THE FINEST TURN-OUTS IN THE CITY.

We Furnished Buffalo Bill's Show with Teams for Country Routes.

EAST FIFTH STREET, CARROLL, IOWA.


FUNKE Opera House.

FRANK C. ZEHRUNG, MANAGER.

Playing Standard Attractions Only.

POPULATION OF LINCOLN, 60,000.

I own and control three thousand feet of BILL BOARDS in prominent locations.

AM A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED BILL POSTERS' ASSOCIATION.

LINCOLN, NEB.


Gran Ensign, PROPRIETOR OF ENSIGN'S Omnibus and Transfer Line.

CARRIAGES, COUPES AND BAGGAGE EXPRESS.

I furnish the proper Teams and Spring Wagons for Country Routes.

H. A. ENSIGN, MANAGER.

OFFICE AND STABLES, Nos. 217, 219, 221, and 223 South 11th Street. Lincoln, Neb. TELEPHONES, 303 & 367.

 

FULLER & LEE, MANAGERS Paddock . Opera . House.

Bill Posting AND DISTRIBUTING

Controlling 800 feet of Bill Boards. JOSEPH H. MARTIN, Bill Poster.

Beatrice, Neb.


S. P. WHEELER, President. C. H. COTTER, Vice-Prest. M. V. NICOLS, Treas. W. H. OTTO, Sec. & Gen'l Mgr.

BEATRICE OMNIBUS CO.,

HACK LINES, LIVERY, AND SALES STABLES.

Furnish First-Class Teams for Country Routes.

COR. SIXTH AND MARKET STS., BEATRICE, NEB. TELEPHONE 33.


CHARLEY GILL, THE UP-TO-DATE Liveryman

LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE LIVERY OUTFIT IN THE CITY

Country Route Teams for all Shows, furnished for the past 20 years. Good, quick service. Stables, 5th and Charles.

TELEPHONE 118 ST. JOSEPH, MO.

 

A. J. AVERY, LICENSED City Bill Poster

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 65,000 POPULATION.

Over 3,000 Feet (Lineal) of Boards.

ALL FIRST-CLASS LOCATIONS

ADVANCE AGENTS for all Tent Shows. See me. You cannot afford to skip us.


M. B. DONOVAN, PROPRIETOR OF Donovan Coal, Ice and Transfer Co.

Country Routes a Specialty.

DEALER IN WOOD, COAL, OIL AND FEED. HAY, GRAIN AND FEED SUPPLIED.

Office, Main & Cherokee Sts., TELEPHONE, 247. Leavenworth, Kas.

 

I. H. BOWMAN, PROPRIETOR OF THE Imperial Hotel.

Lessee and Manager of CRAWFORD'S OPERA HOUSE.

Licensed Bill Posting and Distributing

Controls over 3,000 Lineal Feet of BILL BOARDS.

OFFICE, Imperial Hotel, Leavenworth, Kans.


THOMAS L. GAUGH. W. MORT. GAUGH.

GAUGH & GAUGH, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Grain, Hay, Coal and Millstuffs.

WE FURNISH ALL SHOWS WITH FEED.

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE, 1402 Grand Avenue, KANSAS CITY, MO. TELEPHONE 385.

 

Carlat Livery and Carriage Co.

E. RHOADS, SECRETARY.

FINE NEW CARRIAGES.

BUGGIES AND FINE SADDLE HORSES A SPECIALTY.

Special Rates for Shows, Societies, Parades, Depot Calls, Etc.

118 EAST THIRD STREET, KANSAS CITY, MO. Telephone 431.


ONLY LICENSED BILL POSTERS IN Kansas City, Mo., Kansas City, Kans., Westport, Mo., Argentine. Kans.

KANSAS CITY BILL POSTING CO.

GENERAL ADVERTISING AGENTS.

A. B. HUDSON, Manager.

911 BROADWAY, KANSAS CITY, MO.

 

ESTABLISHED TWENTY YEARS.

KANSAS BILL POSTING CO.

BILL POSTING, SIGN ADVERTISING, DISTRIBUTING.

180,000 Square Feet of Bill Boards.

WHY NOT INCREASE YOUR TRADE?

All our Posting, Sign Painting, Distributing, Sampling and Tacking done by special men who are trustworthy and experts in their line.

WE GUARANTEE 75,000 READERS DAILY.

WE OWN AND CONTROL all the principal and best Boards in LEAVENWORTH, KANS., WICHITA, KANS., TOPEKA, KANS., ST. JOSEPH, MO., and do work in all intermediate towns.

We paint all kinds of Bulletins, Barn and Fence Signs, and Guarantee same for one year.

WRITE FOR ESTIMATES AND PRICES.

General Office, TOPEKA, KANS.


FORT SCOTT BILL POSTING CO.

(LICENSED)

Lithographers and Distributers.

Own All Boards and Control Dead Walls. Cards Tacked, Samples Distributed.

HARRY C. ERNICH, PROPRIETOR. MANAGER DAVIDSON THEATRE.

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

FORT SCOTT, KANSAS.


HANNA BROS., PROPRIETORS OF STAR LIVERY STABLES.

Country Routes a Specialty.

13 and 15 National Avenue, Telephone, 39. FORT SCOTT, KANS.

 

AUGUST FRENZEL. SMITH PENNEY.

FRENZEL & PENNEY, WHOLESALE DEALERS IN Grain, Baled Hay and Straw

Linseed Meal, Chopped Feed, Bran, Etc.

FURNISH ALL LARGE SHOWS WITH FIRST-CLASS FEED AND PROMPT DELIVERY.

Cor. Fourth and Angelique Sts., ST. JOSEPH, Mo. TELEPHONE 292.


Wood's Opera House

SEATING CAPACITY, 1,500.

CONTROL Bill Posting and all Advertising PRIVILEGES.

H. W. WOOD, DRUGGIST AND CHEMIST,

Opera House Pharmacy.

SEDALIA, Mo.

POPULATION 25,000.


JOHN A. COLLINS, QUEEN CITY LIVERY STABLE

I HAVE FURNISHED Teams for Country Routes past 20 years—Quick service.

213 West Fourth Street, SEDALIA, Mo. TELEPHONE No. 1.


GEO. T. MENEFEE & SONS, DEALERS IN CORN, OATS, HAY ALL KINDS OF CHOP FEED. WOOD AND COAL.

Second and Moniteau Sts., SEDALIA, Mo. TELEPHONE No. 22.

 

E.D. HAMILTON GROCER

No. 228 East Main Street, JACKSON, Mich. Takes care of all the Big Shows. He feeds them well at minimum cost.


SPINDLER GROCERY DEALER IN Fancy Groceries

CHAS. SPINDLER, PROPRIETOR.

Cor. Hoyt Street and Washington Avenue, SAGINAW, E. S., MICH. Telephone No. 372.

 

THOS. WALSH, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCER.

Hotel and Boarding House Trade a Specialty.

109 & 111 Midland St. Telephone Connection. WEST BAY CITY.


The Sandusky Steam Baking Company.

MANUFACTURERS OF FINE BREADS, CAKES, Etc., Etc.,

FACTORY: COR. OSBORNE AND CARR STS., Sandusky, Ohio.

 

Hicks Grocery Co.

COR. NICOLLET AVE. AND 26TH STREET. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.


YOUNG AND MONSON, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCERS.

AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED TYCOON TEA.

132 & 134 South Front Street, MANKATO, MINN.


MERCHANTS HOTEL ANDLIVERY

WILLEY & WILLLIAMS, PROPS.

SIOUX FALLS, S. D.


GEORGE J. FESSEL, PROPRIETOR OF THE Crescent Restaurant and BAKERY.

Fine Confectionery, Fresh Fruits, Oysters, Game, and Ice Cream in Season.

Choice Line of Cigars and Tobacco.

Special Prices to all LARGE SHOWS.

Fort Dodge, Iowa.

 

N. F. HAWORTH. J. A. HAWORTH.

N. F. HAWORTH & BRO., LIVERY Feed and Sale Stable

Fine Turn-outs Furnished for Country Routes.

110-112 North Williams Street, MOBERLY, MO.


WESLEY GORHAM, Bill Poster and DISTRIBUTER

Own and Control All Bill Boards.

RELIABLE AND PROMPT. ALL WORK GUARANTEED.

ALWAYS ASK FOR WESLEY.

MOBERLY, MO.


SMITH BROS., CITY MEAT MARKET

Special Prices to Shows.

MASON CITY, IOWA.

 

Cobb & Knapp Grocers.

Waterloo, Iowa.


A. B. ROSS Groceries CROCKERY, GLASSWARE PROVISIONS, Cigars, Tobaccos, Etc.

SPECIAL PRICES TO ALL SHOWS. FRESH GOODS AND LOW PRICES.

CHEROKEE, Iowa.

 

D. E. LEARY, DEALER IN STAPLE AND FANCY Groceries

CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, WOOD AND WILLOW WARE.

Cor. Central Ave. and Seventh St. FIRST DOOR WEST OF COURT HOUSE. Fort Dodge, IOWA.


LEAVENWORTH BILL POSTING CO. BROOKS & CO. BILL POSTERS, Dramatic AND Advertising Agents.

ENGAGEMENTS MADE ON PERCENTAGE.

COR. FOURTH AND SENECA STS., Leavenworth, Kansas.


THOSE DESIRING COPIES OF Official Souvenir Buffalo Bill's Wild West FOR 1896

Address, CHAS. R. HUTCHINSON, WINTER QUARTERS, BRIDGEPORT, CONN.

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MAJOR JOHN M. BURKE.

[image]

JAMES ANDERSON.

 

"THE OLD GUARD."

Buffalo Bill's Wild West, unlike any other amusement exhibition, was an original creation, its component parts and acts having been launched together as a whole, a satisfactory, unique affair. As such it has attracted the attention of the amusement world, commanded the favor of the public and marked a new history in the era of horsemanship, ethnology and historic accuracy of pictures presented, feats accomplished and genuineness of the characters participating. As time rolls on and the future chroniclers of our day record their annals of events, its birth, production, evolution, travels and the incidents of its career will assume an interest far beyond that which the casual observer of the present would suspect. Like the treasured histories and traditions of the drama, la cirque, the opera and vaudeville of the past becomes subject of the pen, so will come the transcript of "America's National Entertainment," a matter of interest as regards the originators, the cast of character and the associates connected with its baptism.

Originating in the brain of W. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill), its conception was inspired and its development aided by the romantic surroundings of actual scenes connected with the subject, incident to his career from boyhood to his development as a picturesque leading character in the story it portrayed. To him belongs the credit of thus presenting to the world for the first time an exhibition that in fact truthfully and actually "holds the mirror up to nature." Due credit must also be given to his confrere, Mr. Nate Salsbury, in its management and evolution until it embraced and justly earned the sub-title "Congress of the Rough Riders of the World."

After contemplating for years the feasibilities of presenting in reality the historic scenes and incidents heretofore depending on the pen of the historian, the reports of the army officials, the brush of the painter, the skill of the sculptor, the imagination of the romancer and novelist, Buffalo Bill, at the celebration of our natal day, Fourth of July   1882, gathered experimentally a corps of Western experts with their red allies, the American Indian, at North Platte, Neb., and on the very ground famed as disputed territory between the contending Indians and the white advance guard of civilization, proved its presentation a practical accomplishment. The genuineness of the pictures delineated demanded the possession of rare physical powers, agility, courage, expertness and endurance beyond any exhibition ever organized. To him, personally, must be conceded the laurel crown of supremacy for a continual physical, as well as mental, strain, in the conduct of the performances given with but little interruption, twice a day for nearly fourteen years—a record unbroken and unequaled for personal exertion, remarkable energy, activity and strain in physical endurance, unexcelled, rendering him entitled to and deserving the oft-applied title of "Modern Gladiator."

It is on record that he has never in sunshine, rain, even snow and hail, missed a performance, in which, besides his personal participation, he is necessitated to be constantly alert in directing.

In the fourteen years, the roster of the company embraces over five thousand names, he alone standing forth as the only present participant in the first arenic display. And in connection with its first production in continuous service from its incipient organization in a camp located at Columbus, Neb., in the spring of 1883, and the first performance at Omaha, in May, 1883, there remains but Jule Keen, Johnny Baker, and Major John M. Burke of the original members, forming with Col. Cody what is now known as the "Old Guard." These well-known companions of its tours and followers of its fortunes in continuous service have continued during this season ably to fulfill the requirements of their positions. Their records include all the tours in American and Europe, and all have been noted for the uninterrupted attention to the requirements and duties entailed on them. The Old Guard are highly thought of and much respected by their associates and of their especial adaptation in their particular lines, and had the opportunity on one occasion of being appropriately photographed on the famed hill of Waterloo, where was the splendid exhibition of devotion to cause and duty that rendered forever memorable Napoleon's Old Guard.

Death has claimed many of the participants of this organization, noticeably Major Frank North, Capt. Fred Matthews, Capt. George Clothier, noted Indian fighters; and the celebrated Indian chiefs, Black Bird, Crow Eagle, Spotted Horn Bull, the celebrated Sitting Bull, who loaned their historic careers to the accuracy and legitimacy of this interesting and educational affair.

 

An object of international interest has been the Deadwood Stage Coach, now the most celebrated in the history of the world. Built in 1863, at Concord, N. H., it voyaged in the clipper ship General Grant around Cape Horn to California, where it ran on the line from Northwood to Oregon, drifted back to Utah, following the building of the lines of the Central Pacific across the Rocky Mountains until the conjoining of that road with the Union Pacific, and then became famous in 1876 on the lines between Cheyenne and Deadwood. Its sanguinary history as passenger and treasure coach would fill volumes. It has accompanied the exhibition on all its tours; has been an object of interest at Rotten Row, London; Champs Elysee, Bois de Boulogne, Paris; the Corso in Rome; the Boulevards of Naples; the Ramblier, Barcelona; the Prata, Vienna; Unter den Linden, Berlin; the Drive, Brussels, and other leading cities. It has carried more distinguished passengers that any vehicle known to the world's history—more presidents, queens, princes and princesses—royalty of fact, and royalty of brain—than ever did or ever can possibly honor by their presence any similar equipage. In the course of time its history and its presence will be a valued relic in the Smithsonian Institute, at Washington, D. C.

Another episode in the career of the Wild West was its inauguration of the Coliseum, Chicago, which was appropriately opened with a grand ovation equalling the famous patronage extended it the season of the World's Fair. This building is the largest of its kind in the world, and is built on exactly the same ground where was the camp and arena of Buffalo Bill's Rough Riders of the World during the Columbian Exposition. This adds another location to the many that have become permanent and have since become devoted to amusements that this company had dedicated to the public of different nations, notably Earls Court, London; the Buffaloville Athletic Grounds, Paris; the Kofferdam Strasse Spiel Platz, Berlin; the Corso Americano, Barcelona; and many others that will probably remain as permanent monuments of the American Scout, Col. W. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill).

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WILLIAM SWEENEY.

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VICENTE ORAPEZA.

 

"ONLY A BILL POSTER."

Only a Bill Poster with bucket and paste,
Working for bread, with all possible haste.
No time to think, no time for day-dreams;
The world thinks him dumb, just what he seems.

He runs up the ladder with dextrous pace,
Spreads out a bill, and, minding the face,
Matches the shoulders on to the head,
Leaving it perfect, with two brush's spread.

He lays out the stands, rolls up the sheets,
Giving kind words to all whom he greets;
And as they sing out, "What's up to-day?"
"Hyde & Behman in specialty," you'll hear him say.

Or John McCullough as Richard; Keen as Macbeth;
John Raymond in "Fresh," so the bill say'th;
Mary in "Ingomar;" Ada Gray in "East Lynne;"
Charles Davis as "Joslyn" (a terrible skin).

Charles Gardner in "Karl," or Maginly's "Square Man."
"Square Man" is a hit (beat it who can).
Robert Van Winkle as Rip McWade,
(Tho' he acts well it never has paid).

Billy Powers, the "Gallery;" Harry Webber as "Nip;"
Minnie Palmer, as "Sweetheart;" Sir Joseph as "Rip."
So he answer the questions, and speeds on his way;
Bread and butter is wanted, no time for delay.

 

On he speeds with his work—bent on the gains—
Not a minute for thought; no use for brains
Other than those to get the "stand" square,
With streamer at top, the rest pretty fair.

The dates and the blanks equally spaced,
"Cut down at the end," and properly placed
To suit the eye of an agent or two,
On their first season out, and too utterly "new."

He may have thoughts would astonish the world;
He's no time to tell them, so he is hurled
Bang up against the rough end of life;
It's "paste" or be starved in this world of strife.

There's a class in this world of the Miss Nancy kind,
Who turn up their noses (the largest part of their mind),
For he's "only a Bill Poster," without any brain,
Crowding through life for positive gain.

"Only a Bill Poster," without any brain,
"Slinging out paste" for positive gain;
While the lah-de-dah Nancy gets out of his track,
If the Bill Poster passes, for fear of contact.

We can make better brains with our mustiest flour,
Laid out in the sun and baked for an hour,
Than these poor devils, with pomp and conceit,
Who, meeting a Bill Poster, crosses the street.

"Only a Bill Poster;" yet he thanks God,
Who made men alike—to end in the sod.
That the fool sleeps as well as the man full of thought.
It ends in the grave, then—nothing—but naught.

Then brothers in paste don't get sad at your fate.
You can think for yourselves, and though you may hate
The ass who turns up his æthetic nose,
Like you, in the end, he "turns up his toes."

And when we get through with paste, bucket and flour,
Care and work laid aside, and it comes the last hour;
We'll each drop a tear for the other who's gone,
And let the world go on with laughing and scorn.

 

LATER (By Sixteen Years).

The genial souls of other days,
  The Posters often greeted,
Have passed beyond the need of paste,
  And at His right hand are seated—(or otherwise.)

Poor John McCullough, bright "Billy" Power,
McCauley and Fowler have met the last hour;
John Raymond too, with Barrett and Booth;
George Knight and Forepaugh, old age and youth.

Barnum and Scanlan, have all passed away,
Leaving old fogies, like myself and Sam Clay,
Still bossing the brush or dobbing with paste;
(With not so much vim nor nigh the same haste.)

For the years have been creeping up our back hair,
Leaving traces of gray, with wrinkles of care
On our once "noble brows," and our cheeks once so red
Are shriveled and shrunken, like a codfish gone dead.

Yet our old hearts oft thrill with the slang
Of the old-time actor, or the Bill Posting "gang"
Tho' memories keen, for more'n sixty odd years,
Tell of hopes crushed, of hearts full of tears.

For many of those we've known in the past,
We trust where they've gone they're leads in the "cast"
And when Sam and I get the right "cue"
We'll throw down the brush and come and join you.

To you who are living we advisedly say—
Just keep on living, as long as "'twill pay;"
For you can't just tell them what you'll get after this;
So the fun you get here won't come amiss.

Now good-bye, dobbers, comrades in paste,
Be good to yourselves, each to his taste,
And when you next meet if you miss me and Sam,
I'm sure you won't say, "I don't give a d—n."

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ADVERTISING CAR No. 1.

 

THE ADVANCE

"Buffalo Bill's men are in town to-day, puttin' up Bill's bills," is the gag that has been heard thousands of times this season. This excruciatingly funny joke—in the minds of the jays who spring it—is the best idea the public has of the advance. No doubt there are many with the show whose ideas are just about as clear. For the benefit of those a sentence will be devoted to telling them that it is the advance which makes all the necessary preparations for the show to go into a town and find lots, licenses, provisions and people all ready and waiting for it. Not only is this so, but the management is supplied with reports so itemized, that it knows the location and cost of putting up every sheet of paper used to advertise, and knows the individual bill-poster, lithographer and programmer who did it.

The personnel of the advance is its most important feature. The art preservative is so far advanced that any one can get fine paper if he has the price. But money cannot always buy men and loyalty. This is particularly true, if it may be said modestly, of the advance of Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Perhaps the best comment that can be made of the advance is this: to a man every agent who was in advance in '95 was re-engaged for '96. But one proved faithless to his trust, a poor wretch, who sacrificed friends and honor to the worship of liquor and cards, and defrauded his generous employers of money. This is particularly painful, as it is the first instance in years of that sort of thing happening among the men who make up the advance.

The major-general of the advance was Mr. W. H. Gardner. For more than twenty years he filled   the same position for the Barnum & Bailey Show. It goes without saying that his ripe experience, cool judgment, and indefatigable industry has been the inspiration of the entire advance. If he had any fault it was that he worked too hard and risked his health and services to the show; if he erred it was in kindness.

Major John M. Burke, General Manager, is also claimed by the advance. The Major is the major, unique, solitary, the only one of his kind. His huge form, all two small for his heart, casts as welcome a shadow as ever fell across the threshold of an editorial room. It is not fulsome adulation to say that the newspapers only honor themselves in honoring Major Burke, and they, knowing it, inevitably place their columns at his command. Reminiscence, history, anecdote, story, fall from his lips in as graceful stream as ever water flowed from a fountain, and they are eagerly caught up by the editors, and repeated in print in a generous and genuine effort to let their readers share in the "feast of reason and flow of soul." John Burke can neither be considered or written of as an ordinary man, and the writer, as one member of a harmonious advance, feels all too keenly the poverty of his pen, when he attempts to set down the pride and pleasure of himself and all the others, in being classed in the same company with Major Burke.

The Hon. Michael Cassius Coyle was at the head of the transportation department. He is chiefly loved for the enemies he does not make. He has not one on earth.

Whiting Allen continued to spend the show's money with the newspapers, and occasionally found one that would print something he had to say about the show.

What shall be said of that simple-minded, sweet-souled general contracting agent, Solomon Herod Semon, "the youngest agent in the business"? The manner in which "Old Si" went around paying exorbitant sums for lots, licenses and bill-boards at Si-ox City, Dub-u-que and all "them other towns" was "simply heart rendering," as the jay said when his best girl shook him. Seriously, he earned the gratitude of the entire advance for putting them up in the finest line of swell hotels any advance ever enjoyed.

Mr. H. H. Gunning was manager of Car No. I. The very strictest of disciplinarians, even-tempered and just, he played no small part in making this show as well billed as any show on earth. But what a sight Col. Heatherstone Hurlingham was when he went flying through every town upon his Columbia wheel! Winged-feet Mercury was enraged with jealousy—not of his lack of veracity, but of his speed and omnipresence.

 

To Mr. George Goodheart, manager of Car No. 2, was entrusted the important task of working up the excursions. That his work was well done need not be said. He is thinking about entering the lists for the championship of the world as a trick bicycle rider—nit.

If there is one car agent more than another who is less welcome to the opposition, it is Fred Beckman, manager of Car No. 3. There was no calliope upon the car; it was only Fred's shirts.

Mr. Bert J. Conn, well known in Holland as the Count of Geldermalsen, and Mr. J. Fred LeCrone, were the Argus-eyed gentlemen who saw to it that work was done as reported in the country, and paper kept in place in the windows of the towns.

Harry Barnum, the Duke of Johannesburg, took his sackful of Kohinoors into every city and proceeded to lay out the town. Laymen must not suppose he abused anyone. "Laying-out" is a term that is purely technical in this business.

There is no calling in which a greater degree of harder manual labor and intelligence are necessarily combined than bill-posting ahead of such a show as this. In the Buffalo Bill roster there were many of the acknowledged cracker-jacks and record-holders. There is not enough space to name them, but a route book would be incomplete that did not mention the veteran George Hurst, who completed his thirtieth consecutive year, the last sixteen of which have been spent in the same car, in one corner of which has been his couch during all those years. Pete Dunn is another veteran who should be named. "Manager" George Beckley has earned a proud record for hard and intelligent work. Chas. Moralles, a veteran and literateur, M. G. Fisher, "Cyclone" Arthur McCloud, Al Foss. George E. Rice, Knapp, and Boss Bill Posters Tom Brown, Chas. Knox and Tommy Morgan-who-played-the-organ, are all men of whom only best things may be said. The names of the others may be found in the rosters of their respective cars.

With a force so thoroughly organized and made up of such steady, reliable men, work proceeded with a regularity that was well-nigh tranquil. Probably no other show met with so little close opposition. One concern with the boldness and recklessness of youth ventured into the territory of this show. They had been badly whipped last season, but it was "not in our own country." This season it was in "their country." They tried it only twice and to their sorrow. They started out to "spank" other people and the spanking has yet to be done.

The glorious Fourth was celebrated at Toledo by Car No. I. "Papa" J. E. Allien, representing the publishers of the official programme, is nothing if   not patriotic, and to him must be given credit for making the celebration a noisy and enthusiastic success. A very large supply of fireworks were secured, and taken to the car which was stationed at the end of the Cherry street bridge, opposite the main part of the city, and in full view therefrom. The car was most elaborately decorated. The public had been duly notified through the press of the boys' intention, and evening found the car surrounded by nearly two thousand persons, while from the bridge and other points of vantage several thousands more could see the pyrotechnic display. Several special policemen were sent to preserve order and the evening passed off with great eclat. A balloon thirty feet high was among the pieces sent up, and it carried dates and small printing that was released at a vast altitude to carry back to earth the glad tidings that Buffalo Bill was coming. This celebration may or may not have done something to making Toledo one of the banner days of the season for the show.

Accidents and other misfortunes were very infrequent. There were no fatalities until the No. I car reached Joliet. Six two-horse teams went out on one of those days when the grim destroyer came in the form of heat. Six of the poor horses fell to rise no more.

The nearest approach to a calamity was when Frank Archer, secretary and typewriter of Car No. I, went to see his girl at Yankton, and she tried to get him to stop off there and marry her. But Frank was brave, and did not yield to the allurement, and the next morning was back at work as if nothing had happened.

There may be nothing very startling in this chapter devoted to the advance. But it is not intended as an exhaustive chronicle of events; rather is it the register of simply a part, albeit an important one, of the machinery that served to bring to the very doors of the people of America, in all its international glory, Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World.

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Courier Co.

CANVASMEN.

 

STATISTICS

To give an estimate of the size of the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, it is only necessary to state that it takes 201,000 square feet of ground to put up the big top alone; and to put up everything we ought to have eleven acres of ground at least; the amount of canvas put up is as follows:

Big Top 7,000 Yards.
Side Wall 5,000 "
Horse Tents 4,000 "
Dressing Room 1,500 "
Side Show 2,000 "
Dining Tent 2,500 "
Marquee 500 "
Engine Tent 250 "
22,750 Yards.

The stakes used are as follows:

Big Top 344
Toe Pins 225
Bronco Tent 96
Baggage Stock 68
Dressing Room 68
Back Wall 65
Dining Tent 68
Marquee 25
Side Show 38
Side Show Banners 32
Engine Tent 10
Beacon and Electric Light 65
1,104

As near as can be estimated there are over twenty miles of rope used in the construction, guard-ropes, etc.

 

SUMMARY

Season of 1895.

Stock and wagons were shipped from the Buffalo Bill Wild West Grounds, Ambrose Park, South Brooklyn. N. Y., Saturday, April 12th, over the B. & O. R. R. for Philadelphia, where we opened Monday, April 22d, at 11th and York streets.

Number of two-week stands, two—one at Philadelphia, Pa., and the other at Boston, Mass.; number of one-week stands, one—at Atlanta, Ga.; number of two day stands, nine; number of one day stands, 156; number of one-show stands, two—at Salsbury, N. C., and New Decatur, Alabama; number of shows missed— one at Carbondale, Pa., on account of bad condition of lot and street-car strike; number of shows given, 333; number of days out of Brooklyn, 203; lots, fair grounds, 41; private lots, 127; towns with horse cars, four; towns with no street cars, eleven; number without electric lights, three; number without water-works, one; smallest city we gave a show in was White River Junction, Vt.—number of inhabitants, 794; number of rainy days, 33; cloudy and threatening, 29; number of clear days, 94; number of miles traveled, 10,353; number of roads traveled over, 32; miles traveled by horses, including to and from lots and parade, 794; number of men lost, two—porter of staff-car No. 50 was struck by fast mail train at 10.30 P. M. at Pittsfield, Mass., and instantly killed, and two cook-house employees, Doyle and Emett, at Atlanta, Ga., got to quarreling, and Doyle shot Emett dead. Death during the performance among the audience—at Manchester, N. H., Al. Thompson died at 9.30 P. M. of heart disease; at Ogdensburg, N. Y., a Mr. Price, who lived six miles up the St. Lawrence River, and a Mr. Wilkinson, who lived in the city, both died of heart disease during the afternoon performance; both were old men and very feeble.

 

Blow downs—at Oswego, N. Y., August 6th, 2.30 P. M., a wind-storm blew down both horse tents and dressing room, and the west side of the grand stand; several people injured, but none fatally. Railroad accident coming into Biddeford, Maine, Sunday, July 15th—axle broke under stock car and delayed first section two hours. At Akron, Ohio, Tuesday, August 27th, the car containing cook-house wagons was smashed in switching; wagons transferred and got through next day at noon. Tuesday, August 13th, while coming to the train at night the emigrant wagon was struck by a train, and both mules were killed. At Schenectady, N. Y., in bringing the stock to the train, a buffalo cow got into the canal and was drowned. Our accidents and losses were remarkably small, taken from a business standpoint, and the season was all that could be expected. There were only two weeks that might be considered bad ones, the week in North Carolina and the closing week in Atlanta, Ga. The management has every reason to feel proud of the Buffalo Bill Wild West Company, as a business enterprise for the season of 1895.

1883.

The Buffalo Bill Wild West Show was organized as an out-door show in 1883, and opened in Omaha, Neb., in May, and traveled through the States of Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, giving the performance in Fair Grounds with the exception of Coney Island, where a temporary stand was erected, and they remained there five weeks. It was at this place that the first horse race was ever given by electric light.

1884.

Opened in May in St. Louis, Mo, went through the Eastern States and Canada. October 31st took a boat down the Mississippi River bound for New Orleans. The boat was wrecked at Rodney, Miss., and everything was lost except horses. Opened in New Orleans Christmas week, and closed April I, 1885, then worked north through the Central and Southern States, including Michigan and Wisconsin, and closed October 31st at St. Louis, Mo.

1886.

Opened in St. Louis in May, and then played through to New York, where they opened a season at Erastina, Staten Island, in June, and remained until September 30th, then opened a winter season at Madison Square Garden Thanksgiving Eve, and closed Washington's Birthday, 1887. During their   stay at the Garden they lost sixteen buffaloes from lung trouble.

1887.

April 1st sailed on the Steamer State of Nebraska for London, England, where they remained a season of six months, and then went to Manchester, England for six months, and closed April 30th, 1888; then gave one performance at Hull, England, in the afternoon, and sailed the same night for New York City on the Steamer Persian Monarch.

1888.

Opened the season at Erastina, Staten Island, on Decoration Day, and remained six weeks; then went to Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, and closed at the State Fair in Richmond, Va., October 22d.

1889.

Sailed April 12th on the Steamer Persian Monarch for Havre, France, where a season of six months was played at Paris. They then toured through France, Spain, Italy, Germany and Austria, and closed in the City of Strasburg, Alsace-Lorraine, October 29, 1890. Some of the troupe returned to the United States, while others remained there.

1891.

Opened in Stuttgart, April 15th, and played through Germany, Belgium and England; closed at Croyden, England, October 31st. Opened again at Glasgow, Scotland, November 15th, and remained until April 15, 1892. May 9th opened again in London, and closed October 27, 1892, and sailed on the Steamer Mohawk, October 29th, for New York City.

1893.

This was the World's Fair season. There was a Grand Stand erected at 62d and 63d streets and Grace avenue, Chicago, with a seating capacity of 20,000 people. It was opened April 26th, and closed October 31st, making 186 days of continuous performance; not one show was missed, and it closed the most successful season known in show history.

1894.

Opened at Ambrose Park, Brooklyn, N. Y., May 12th, and closed October 6th. One show was missed September 19th, on account of heavy rain; no Sunday shows were given, making a run of 126 days.

 

1895

MONDAY, APRIL 22, TO SATURDAY, MAY 4, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

MAY.

DATE. PLACE. State. RAILROAD. Mls
 5 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 6 Mon. Pottsville Pa. P. & R. 93
 7 Tues. Reading " P. & R. 35
 8 Wed. Easton " P. & R. and L. V 53
 9 Thurs Allentown " Lehigh Valley 17
10 Fri. Wilkesbarre " Lehigh Valley 82
11 Sat. Scranton " D. & H. Co. 19
12 Sun. ... ... ... ...
13 Mon. Carbondale " D. & H. Co. 16
14 Tues. Oneonta. N. Y. D. & H. Co. 94
15 Wed. Schenectady " D. & H. Co. 75
16 Thurs. Gloversville " N. Y. C. and F., J. & G 37
17 Fri. Troy " F., J. & G and N. Y. C 59
18 Sat. Poughkeepsie " N. Y. C. & H. R 75
19 Sun. ... ... ... ...
20 Mon. Albany " N. Y. C. & H. R. 70
21 Tues. " "
22 Wed. Pittsfield Mass. Boston & Albany 51
23 Thurs. North Adams " Boston & Albany 20
24 Fri. Greenfield " Fitchburg 38
25 Sat. Holyoke " Boston & Maine 28
26 Sun. ... ... ... ...
27 Mon. Springfield " Boston & Maine 8
28 Tues. Waterbury Conn. N. Y. & N. E 65
29 Wed. Danbury " N. Y. & N. E 30
30 Thurs. Bridgeport " N. Y., N. H. & H 39
31 Fri. New Haven " N. Y., N. H. & H 18

JUNE.

DATE. PLACE. State. RAILROAD. Mls
 1 Sat. New Haven Conn. N. Y., N. H. & H. 18
 2 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 3 Mon. Hartford " N. Y., N. H. & H. 36
 4 Tues. Norwich " N. Y. & N. E. 70
 5 Wed. Woonsocket R. I. N. Y. & N. E. 61
 6 Thurs. Worcester Mass. N. Y. & N. E. 54
 7 Fri. " "
 8 Sat. Fitchburg " Fitchburg 26
 9 Sun. ... ... ... ...
10 Mon. to Sat. 22 Boston " Old Colony 73
23 Sun. ... ... ... ...
24 Mon. Providence R. I. Old Colony 44
25 Tues. " "
26 Wed. Newport " Old Colony 37
27 Thurs. Fall River Mass. Old Colony 19
28 Fri. Brockton " Old Colony 31
29 Sat. New Bedford " Old Colony 34
30 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 

JULY.

DATE. PLACE. State. RAILROAD. Mls
 1 Mon. Lowell Mass. Old Colony 82
 2 Tues. " "
 3 Wed. Nashua N. H. Boston & Maine 15
 4 Thurs. Concord " Concord & Mont. 38
 5 Fri. Manchester " Concord & Mont. 18
 6 Sat. Lawrence Mass. Boston & Maine 27
 7 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 8 Mon. Haverhill " Boston & Maine 7
 9 Tues. Salem " Boston & Maine 30
10 Wed. Gloucester " Boston & Maine 15
11 Thurs. Lynn " Boston & Maine 20
12 Fri. Portsmouth N. H. Boston & Maine 45
13 Sat. Rochester " Boston & Maine 22
14 Sun. ... ... ... ...
15 Mon. Biddeford Me. Boston & Maine 39
16 Tues. Lewiston " B. & M. and Me. Cent. 51
17 Wed. Waterville " Maine Central 48
18 Thurs. Bangor " Maine Central 55
19 Fri. Augusta " Maine Central 74
20 Sat. Portland " Maine Central 62
21 Sun. ... ... ... ...
22 Mon. St. Johnsbury Vt. Me. Cent. and B. & M. 135
23 Tues. W. River Jct. " Boston & Maine 61
24 Wed. Montpelier " Central Vermont 65
25 Thurs. St. Albans " Central Vermont 56
26 Fri. Burlington " Central Vermont 33
27 Sat. Rutland " Central Vermont 67
28 Sun. ... ... ... ...
29 Mon. Saratoga N. Y. D. & H. C. Co. 63
30 Tues. Glens Falls " D. & H. C. Co. 22
31 Wed. Plattsburg " D. & H. C. Co. 177

AUGUST.

DATE. PLACE. State. RAILROAD. Mls
 1 Thurs. Malone N. Y. D. & H. and C. V. 65
 2 Fri. Ogdensburg " Central Vermont 61
 3 Sat. Watertown " R., W. & O. 68
 4 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 5 Mon. Syracuse " R., W. & O. 73
 6 Tues. Oswego " R., W. & O. 37
 7 Wed. Utica " R., W. & O. and N. Y. C 90
 8 Thurs. Auburn " N. Y. C. & H. R. 79
 9 Fri. Geneva " N. Y. C. & H. R. 25
10 Sat. Lockport " N. Y. C. & H. R. 106
11 Sun. ... ... ... ...
12 Mon. Rochester " N. Y. C. & H. R. 56
13 Tues. Olean " W. N. Y. & P. 108
14 Wed. Hornellsville. " Erie 63
15 Thurs. Bradford Penn. Erie 86
16 Fri. DuBois " B., R. & P. 87
17 Sat. Warren " Penna 82
18 Sun. ... ... ... ...
19 Mon. Buffalo N. Y. W. N. Y. & P. 132
20 Tues. " "
21 Wed. Dunkirk " Erie 39
22 Thurs. Jamestown " Erie 37
23 Fri. Meadeville Penn Erie 68
24 Sat. Erie " P., C. & St. L. & Nic. Pl. 61
25 Sun. ... ... ... ...
26 Mon. Cleveland Ohio. Nickel Plate 95
27 Tues. Youngstown. " Penna 67
28 Wed. Akron " Penna 55
29 Thurs. Canton " Penna 24
30 Fri. E. Liverpool. " Penna 66
31 Sat. Wheeling W. Va Penna 47
 

SEPTEMBER.

DATE. PLACE. State. RAILROAD. Mls
 1 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 2 Mon. Pittsburg Pa. Baltimore & Ohio 71
 3 Tues. " "
 4 Wed. McKeesport. " Baltimore & Ohio 15
 5 Thurs. Connellsville. " Baltimore & Ohio 43
 6 Fri. Johnstown " Penna 72
 7 Sat. Altoona " Penna 38
 8 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 9 Mon. Lancaster " Penna 169
10 Tues. York " Penna 25
11 Wed. Harrisburg " Penna 28
12 Thurs. Williamsport. " Penna 93
13 Fri. Elmira N. Y. Penna 78
14 Sat. Ithaca " Elmira, Cort. & Nor.. 50
15 Sun. ... ... ... ...
16 Mon. Cortland " Elmira, Cort. & Nor.. 20
17 Tues. Norwich " Del., Lack. & West 62
18 Wed. Binghamton. " Del., Lack. & West 42
19 Thurs. Port Jervis " Erie 127
20 Fri. Middletown.. " Erie 21
21 Sat. Newburg " Erie 32
22 Sun. ... ... ... ...
23 Mon. Paterson N. J. Erie 46
24 Tues. Orange " Del., Lack. & West 27
25 Wed. Newark " Del , Lack. & West 4
26 Thurs. " "
27 Fri. Trenton " Penna 48
28 Sat. Wilmington.. Del. Penna 56
29 Sun. ... ... ... ...
30 Mon. Baltimore Md. Penna 69

OCTOBER.

DATE. PLACE. State. RAILROAD. Mls
 1 Tues. Baltimore Md. Penna 69
 2 Wed. Washington.. D. C. Penna 42
 3 Thurs. " "
 4 Fri. Richmond Va. Penna. and R. F. & P. 116
 5 Sat. Norfolk " A. C. L. and N. & W.. 104
 6 Sun. ... ... ... ...
 7 Mon. Wilmington N. C. N. & W. and A. C. L.. 244
 8 Tues. Goldsboro " A. C L. 84
 9 Wed. Raleigh " A. C. L. 48
10 Thurs. Greensboro.. " Southern 82
11 Fri. Salisbury " Southern (1 show) 50
12 Sat. Asheville " Southern 142
13 Sun. ... ... ... ...
14 Mon. Charlotte " Southern 160
15 Tues. Columbia S. C. Southern 168
16 Wed. Charleston " A. C. L. 137
17 Thurs. Savannah Ga. C. & S. 115
18 Fri. Augusta " Central of Ga. 132
19 Sat. Macon " Ga. R'y 125
20 Sun. ... ... ... ...
21. Mon. Columbus... " Central of Ga. 100
22. Tues. Montgomery. Ala. Central of Ga. 94
23 Wed. Birmingham. " L. & N. 96
24 Thurs. New Decatur " L. & N. (1 show) 85
25 Fri. Nashville Tenn. L. & N. 123
26. Sat. Chattanooga. " N., C. & St. L. 151
27. Sun. ... ... ... ...
28. Mon. to Nov. 3 Atlanta Ga. Western & Atlantic 138
 

WHERE DO SHOWMEN GO?

The question has been often asked, and it's one I would like to know,
Is where do showmen come from, and where do showmen go?
I have asked old men this question, men who have been at it all their lives;
They will scratch their heads awhile and look a little wise.

As the season gets close to the end, a way long in the fall,
The boys will get their things together— the bundle is always small.
Each one of them picks up his own things, that is all of them he knows;
The reason why the bundle is small is because he has no clothes.

When the last day comes and we are all packed up and done,
They pick up their little bundle and go out one by one;
They never stop to say "Good-by," or "We have had a pleasant year"—
Just pick up their little bundle and quietly disappear.

When you are through yourself and ready to take the train for home,
You look around for company and find they all have gone;
And so they start off quietly—they always go alone,
You can't tell where they have gone for they never had a home.

 

One or two go South—they do this every fall—
Some stay right in the town and never leave at all;
And so the boys get scattered—get scattered here and there—
No one seems to know where, and no one seems to care.

The season soon rolls around again and there is lots of work to do,
Wagons washed and painted, for things must look like new;
Before the show goes out again the work must all be done,
It is now the boys show up again—they drop in one by one.

And as they drop in day by day you are glad to see them all,
They have got their little bundles, the ones they had last fall.
Where they have been and what they have done no one seems to know,
I think they are like the ground-hog, with the season come and go.

I have traveled with a show myself for many a weary year,
And this is one of the things I never knew or never will I fear.
I wish some prophet would rise up, for some one ought to know,
It is where do showmen come from, and where do showmen go?

 

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[back cover]

Title: Buffalo Bill's Wild West Route Diary

Publisher: Charles R. Hutchinson

Source: McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West , MS6.1995

Date: 1896

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

Editorial Statement | Conditions of Use

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