Title: Inaugural Invitation Exhibition of Buffalo Bill's Wild West

Date: December 17, 1887

More metadata
 

Inaugural Invitation Exhibition
OF
BUFFALO BILL'S
(Hon. W. F. CODY)
WILD WEST

A DEPICTION OF
AMERICAN PIONEER HISTORY,

Under the Patronage and Presence of
HIS WORSHIP THE MAYOR OF SALFORD
(ALBERT L. DICKENS, Esq.),

Assisted by the Mayors of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and the Dignitaries
and Corporations of MANCHESTER and SALFORD, on
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DEC. 17th, 1887, at 2-30
IN THE
New Colossal Building at the Manchester Race Track,
Especially erected to introduce this PAGE of PASSING HISTORY to the
Citizens of Lancashire, Cheshire, and Yorkshire.


MANAGERS { WILLIAM CALDER
RICHARD MANSELL
Architects Messrs.MANGNALL & LITTLEWOODS
Builders Messrs.ROBT. NEILL & SONS
Electric Light THE BRUSH ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANY
Upholstery Mr. SAM INGARITY & CO.
Emblematic Decorations Mr. R. MANSELL (of Queen's Theatre)
Steam Heating Messrs. R. DAWSON & Co.
Gas and Water Fittings Messrs. HARRISON & SONS
Steam Power for Electric Lighting and Warming Messrs. HORNSBY & Co.
Painting and Decorations Messrs. J. WILLIAMS & Co.
Roof Covering and Wall Decorations Mr. THOS. BRIGGS
Tornado Effects BLACKMAN AIR PROPELLER CO.
Novel Pyro Flames Effects Mr. T. S. HAMILTON
Stage Carpenter Mr. J. B. BENNETT
Master Properties COURTLAND MASON
Proscenium WM. McCULLOUCH and CHARLES PARKER

The Grand Natural Scenic Effects:
MR. MATT MORGAN, OF NEW YORK.

GUARDIAN Printing Works, Manchester.

 

BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST CO.

OFFICIAL STAFF.

COL. W. F. CODY (Buffalo Billl), President. NATE SALSBURY, Vice-President.

JOHN M. BURKE General Manager
JULE KEEN Treasurer
ALBERT E. SHEIBLE Business Representative
CARTER COUTOURIER Advertising Agent
HARRY A. LEE Excursion Agent
FRANK RICHMOND Orator
NATE SALSBURY Director

Descriptive Programme of BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST AMERICA'S NATIONAL ENTERTAINMENT.


NOTE.—It is the aim of the management of Buffalo Bill's Wild West to do more than present an exacting and realistic entertainment for public amusement. Their object is to PICTURE TO THE EYE, by the aid of historical characters and living animals, a series of animated scenes and episodes, which had their existence in fact, of the wonderful pioneer and frontier life of the Wild West of America.

Beginning with the Primeval Forest, peopled by the Indian and Wild Beasts only, the story of the gradual civilisation of a vast continent is depicted. The hardships, daring, and frontier skill of the participants being a guarantee of the faithful reproduction of scenes and incidents in which they have had actual experience.

The central figure in these pictures is that of THE HON. W. F. CODY (Buffalo Bill), to whose sagacity, skill, energy, and courage, as a Scout, Guide, Frontiersman, and Indian Fighter, the settlers of the West owe so much for the reclamation of the prairie from the savage Indian and wild animals, who so long opposed the march of civilisation.

Attention to the Orator will materially assist the spectator in his grasp of the leading episodes.


Synopsis.

Frank Richmond Orator
Lewis Parker Contracting Agent and Stage Manager

Scenery by Mr. Matt Morgan, of New York.

OVERTURE.

Wild West Cowboy Band Mr. Wm. Sweeny, Director

Explanatory by Orator Frank Richmond.

Introduction of Individuals and Celebrities of the Wild West.


FIRST EPISODE.

The Primeval Forest of America before its discovery by the white man—Midnight—Wild animals in their native lairs—Dawn—The Indian as he was before the discovery—Sunrise—The friendly dance of two Indian tribes—The Indian courier who tells in the wonderful sign-language of the approach of a hostile tribe—The Attack—The Battle.

 

SECOND EPISODE.

TABLEAU: Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers of "Old England" from the Mayflower on Plymouth Rock—First settlers of "New England."


THIRD EPISODE.

TABLEAU: The saving of the life of Captain John Smith by the Indian Princess Pochahontas, who afterwards married Capt. Jno. Rolfe of Sussex, at Westminster Abbey, and was received by good Queen "Bess." The first of her race to visit ALBION'S SHORES, and whose grave may be seen at Gravesend.


Representation of Indian manners, customs, and dances by the different bands of genuine Indian warriors under the command of RED SHIRT, who were recently conquered by the United States Government, and by whose permission they are allowed to make this tour.


INTERVAL OF FIVE MINUTES, AND SELECTION BY THE COWBOY BAND.


FOURTH EPISODE.

The Prairie in the scorching noonday sun—An oasis in the desert, and the drinking pool—The buffalo and the famous hunter, Buffalo Bill, in pursuit of his native game—"Oh, what a good drink. Pass it arround"—The emigrant train—Twilight—The camp—The Virginia horseback reel—Jule Keen—Buffalo Bill's Dutchman—The sweet sleep of tired folk—The Prairie Fire—The Stampede—The Horror.


Exhibition of skill with firearms: Master Johnny Baker, "the Cowboy Kid." THE COWBOYS' FUN —Picking objects from the ground—Throwing the lasso, and riding BUCKING HORSES—AMERICA'S ROUGH RIDERS: Buck Taylor, "King of the Cowboys;" Jim Mitchell, Billie Bullock, Tony Esquival, Jim Kid, Tom Webb, Broncho Bill, Dick Johnson, Billy Pugh, Cherokee Bill, Tom Duffy, Frank Wheeling, John Hancock, Johnny Baker, and Mexican Vaqueros.


INTERVAL OF FIVE MINUTES, AND SELECTION BY THE COWBOY BAND.


FIFTH EPISODE.

THE CATTLE RANCH—The new home in the Wild West—The Pioneer Farmer—Arrival of Western Girls—Miss EMMA HICOCK, "America's Queen of the side saddle"—The Indian attack—The massacre—The fight—THE RESCUE.


An exhibition of Fancy Rifle Shooting by MISS LILLIAN SMITH, "the California Girl."


SIXTH EPISODE.

The Military Post on the Frontier. Scene 1st: Stockade—A Scout arrives announcing the discovery of a village of hostile Indians—"Boots and Saddles"—Departure of the Troops. Scene 2nd: The Camp of Sitting Bull and his Warriors, on the Little Big Horn River—The Attack—The Charge—The Ambush— The Fall of brave General Custer and his entire command, not one living to tell the tale. The reddest page of savage history was written in THE CUSTER MASSACRE


INTERVAL OF FIVE MINUTES, AND SELECTION BY THE COWBOY BAND.


Colonel W. F. CODY (BUFFALO BILL)

Late Chief of Scouts, U.S. Army, the greatest practical all-round prairie man in the world, will SHOOT on HORSEBACK and on FOOT, and will CRACK the BULL WHIP.


SEVENTH EPISODE.

The Mining Camp—Deadwood City, in the Black Hills—The "Wild West Tavern"—"Keno and Groceries sold here"—The Holiday— Arrival of the Pony Express — Shooting Match between Lillian Smith and Johnny Baker —The Duel—"Another Man for Breakfast"—Justice Defeated—Running the Gauntlet—Departure of the Stage Coach. 2nd Scene: The Canyon— Attack on the Deadwood Stage Coach by Indians, and repulse by Buffalo Bill, Scouts, and Cowboys. 3rd Scene: The Mountain Village again—The Cyclone or Tornado. Legitimate wind effects by the Blackman Air Propeller.

FINALE.

 

A RECORD—TWO CONTINENTS.


To Whom it may concern—

Mr. WILLIAM F. CODY was employed as chief of scouts under Generals Sheridan, Custer, Crook, Miles, Carr, and others, in their campaigns against hostile Indians on our frontier, and as such rendered very valuable and distinguished service.

S. W. DRUM,
Adjutant-General.

[COPY.]

HON. WM. F. CODY,

London, England.

DEAR CODY,— . . . . . . . . . . In common with all your countrymen, I want to let you know that I am not ony gratified, but proud of your management and general behaviour; so far as I can make out you have been modest, graceful, and dignified in all you have done to illustrate the history of civilisation on this Continent during the past century.

I am especially pleased with the graceful and pretty compliment paid you by the Princess of Wales, who rode with you in the Deadwood Coach while it was attacked by the Indians, and rescued by the cowboys. Such things did occur in our days, and may never again.

As near as I can estimate there were in 1865 about nine and a half millions of buffaloes on the plains between the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains, all are now gone—killed for their meat, their skins, and bones.

This seems like desecration, cruelty, and murder, yet they have been replaced by twice as many neat cattle. At that date there were about 165,000 Pawnees, Sioux, Cheyennes, Kiowas, and Araphahoes, who depended on these buffaloes for their yearly food. They, too, are gone, and have been replaced by twice or thrice as many white men and women, who have made the earth to blossom as the rose, and who can be counted, taxed, and governed by the laws of nature and civilisation. This change has been salutary, and will go on to the end. You have caught one epoch of the world's history, have illustrated it in the very heart of the modern world—London, and I want you to feel that on this side the water we appreciate it.

This drama must end; days, years, and centuries follow fast, even the drama of civilisation must have an end.

All I aim to accomplish on this sheet of paper is to assure you that I fully recognise your work, and that the presence of the Queen, the beautiful Princess of Wales, the Prince, the British public, are marks of favour which reflect back on America sparks of light which illuminate many a house and cabin in the land where once you guided me honestly and faithfully in 1865-6 from Fort Riley to Kearney in Kansas and Nebraska.

Sincerely your friend,

W. T. SHERMAN.


Mr. William F. Cody was a scout, and served in my command on the Western frontier for many years. He was always ready for duty, and was a cool, brave man, with unimpeachable character. I take pleasure in commending him for the many services he has rendered to the Army, whose respect he enjoys, for his manly qualities.

P. H. SHERIDAN, Lieutenant-General.


"HE IS KING OF THEM ALL."

MAJOR JOHN M. BURKE: DEAR SIR,—I take pleasure in saying that in an experience of about thirty years on the plains and in the mountains, I have seen a great many guides, scouts, trailers, and hunters, and Buffalo Bill (W. F. Cody) is king of them all. He has been with me in seven Indian fights, and his services have been invaluable.

Very repectfully yours,

EUGENE A. CARR,
Brevet Major-General, U.S.A.


LEADING EDITORIAL, LONDON TIMES, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST, 1887.

[EXTRACT.]

BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST EXHIBITION, which has attracted all the town to West Brompton for the last few months, was brought yesterday to an appropriate and dignified close. A meeting of representative Englishmen and Americans was held, under the presidence of Lord LORNE, in support of the movement for establishing a Court of Arbitration for the settlement of disputes between this country and the United States. At first sight it might seem to be a far cry from the Wild West to an International Court. Yet the connection is not really very remote. They are the effects of increased and increasing intercourse between the two countries, and tend to promote a still more intimate understanding. The Wild West was irresistible. Those who went to be amused often stayed to be instructed. Colonel CODY, much to the astonishment of some of his more superfine compatriots, suddenly found himself the hero of the London season. Notwithstanding his daily engagements and his puntual fulfilment of them, he found time to go everywhere, to see everything, and to be seen by all the world. All London contributed to his triumph, and now the close of his Show is selected as the occasion for promoting a great international movement, with Mr. BRIGHT, Lord GRANVILLE, Lord WOLSELEY, and Lord LORNE for its sponsors. This association of the cause of internatonal arbitration with the fortunes of the Wild West Show has a serious import. After all, the Americans and the English are one stock. Nothing that is American comes altogether amiss to an Englishman. Hence it is no paradox to say that Colonel CODY has done his part in bringing America and England nearer together. The nearer they are brought together the less likely they are to quarrel. Disputes and differences there must occasionally be; but if both parties to a dispute are quite determined not to quarrel over it, it can never become very serious. A serious quarrel between England and the United States would be almost worse than a civil war. Such being the sentiment on both sides, there ought to be no insuperable difficulty in setting up a Court of Arbitration. Colonel CODY can achieve no greater triumph, even if he some day realises the design attributed to him of running the Wild West Show within the classic precincts of the Colosseum at Rome. Civilisation itself consents to march onward in the train of Buffalo Bill.

Title: Inaugural Invitation Exhibition of Buffalo Bill's Wild West

Publisher: Guardian Printing Works

Source: McCracken Research Library, William F. Cody Collection, MS6.2983

Date: December 17, 1887

Topic: European Tours

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

Editorial Statement | Conditions of Use

TEI encoded XML: View wfc.mem00017.xml

Back to top