Title: The Rough Rider Annual

Date: 1902

More metadata
  THE ROUGH RIDER ANNUAL [image]

Rosa Bonheur

-1889-

1902
 

THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE LIKE THIS

Simply because the world will not permit two suns; therefore

BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST
AND CONGRESS OF ROUGH RIDERS

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Differs from all other exhibitions as night from day. Taken as an amusement enterprise, it stands alone, peculiar to itself, unique, because its chief, BUFFALO BILL, is an individual whose counterpart has never been discovered; hence his Wild West can never be duplicated. It is not "a circus" in any sense of the word. It differs from everything commonly known as a "show". Its tents are different. Its programme is different. Its people are different. Its plan and scope is different. Its very announcements are different, and the whole ensemble is totally dissimilar from anything the ingenuity of man has heretofore conceived or devised. It is the one only, the solitary, exception in the great sea of amusement that relies on its originality, realism and worth for its power to please. It is in fact and feature a grand example of genuine merit, and therein lies its lusty, virile strength. [drawing] It is a living page torn from the world's history, where everything is just what it is represented to be. The native tribes, nomads, and noble specimens of mankind are "true color" and perfect to the core. There is nothing about the Wild West that is not real. Even the horses used are born, bred and branded with the stamp of nativity. Every part, parcel and combination of the equipment bears the hall-mark of perfection. These facts stand the test of closest scrutiny, and defy contradiction; therefore its popularity is easily understood, and its welcome most royal in every community. In point of magnitude, it has more men, more horses, more novelties and a greater seating capacity than any other exhibition extant.

  THE ROUGH RIDER [drawing]

COPYRIGHT 1899
by
The Courier Co.
BUFFALO, N.Y.

VOL-IV. 5TH EDITION. SEASON OF 1902. CIRCULATION, 500,000. [images] [image]

THE LATE PRESIDENT Wm McKINLEY FROM A RECENT PHOTO.

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PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT FROM LONDON "PUNCH."

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The Courier Co. BUFFALO, NY

COPYRIGHT 1901 BY WILLIAM H. RAU.

COL. W.F. CODY (BUFFALO BILL) ON THE FAMOUS WAR HORSE "DUKE."

TYPICAL AMERICANS AT HOME IN THE SADDLE.

BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST WILL EXHIBIT AT DULUTH, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
 

THE ROUGH RIDER
AN ILLUSTRATED PERIODICAL, PUBLISHED BY
CODY & SALSBURY.
SEASON OF 1902.


GUARANTEED CIRCULATION, 500,000
For advertising space apply to J. & H. Mayer, Room 506 Townsend Building, 1123 Broadway, New York City.


Printed by THE COURIER COMPANY, Buffalo, N.Y.
FROM WHOM SAMPLE COPIES MAY BE OBTAINED.


THE MAN,

The Epitome of His Time.

OF the admiring multitudes who witness the brilliant and exciting performances in the Wild West arena, comparatively few, in all probability, realize that the thrilling episodes so vividly presented there not only exemplify the strenuous life of the frontier but actually are closely and accurately illustrative of phases in an individual career. It is but natural that one whose ideas take form and color from the tame environment and conventional influences of the effete East, or the bloodless pseudo-civilization of the Old World, should find it difficult to believe that the life of one man could really be so full of perilous vicissitudes, hazardous toils and romantic adventures.

Nothing, however, is more true than the affirmation that every episode in the Wild West program illustrative of characteristically Western American life, in peace and war, represents an incident in the life of Buffalo Bill. To a certain extent those episodes represent common experiences among all who have shared the privations and dangers of the border, but Buffalo Bill managed to have a plenitude of them because his was the uneasy and adventurous sort of nature that goes looking for trouble, seeking its wisdom by the rough road of actual experience. So, while each old plainsman, scout, cowboy or pioneer may see his past reflected in portions of the Wild West's episodic reproductions, Buffalo Bill has been through the originals of all, and few live who can veraciously rival that claim.

Buffalo Bill (Col. W. F. Cody) was raised near Fort Leavenworth when it was a frontier station. The lessons he learned in boyhood were self-reliance, indomitable courage, fidelity to any trust, loyalty to every friend, regard for justice and respect for all human rights.

When only nine years old he became one of the Russel, Wardell & Major's messengers. That firm in those days employed twenty thousand oxen and six thousand horses in the transportation of freight on various Western routes and it was the custom to send out a messenger to meet each incoming, slow-moving train three days journey away from its destination, and bring in its way-bill with whatever other intelligence should be expedited.

Doubtless the lessons of experience received in those employments were the foundation for the extraordinary ability that made Buffalo Bill famous as a scout and Indian fighter a little later. Bronco breaking was incidental to his other occupations at this time, and in it, as in everything else he undertook, he distinguished himself. Skill in "roping" cattle and ponies was [image] COL. W. F. CODY (BUFFALO BILL) AS HE IS TODAY.
A FAVORITE POSITION WHILE DIRECTING THE GREAT WILD WEST EXHIBITION AND "WAITING FOR HIS TURN".
of course an essential qualification for the young plainsman, and extraordinary ability as a marksman with both rifle and revolver was practically a necessity of his existence, almost from the time he was big enough to handle either weapon.

After he became a scout in U. S. Army service his life was even more full of heroic endeavor, thrilling adventure, hairbreadth escapes and gallant achievements than in the most stirring periods in his by no means placid past. Seeking in it subject matter for arenic presentation, one finds an embarasse de richesse.

It was during the first winter campaign against the Indians, conducted by General Sheridan, in 1868, that W. F. Cody's opportunity came for demonstrating the inestimable value of his long and arduous mental and physical training in the wild life of the plains. Gen. Sheridan in his Autobiography states that his first winter Indian campaign was made practicable through the services of "Buffalo Bill"—as Cody was already know by reason of his great success in killing buffaloes to supply with fresh meat the men engaged in building the Kansas Pacific Railway. He was a scout who always dared to traverse the Indian country, and whose wonderful capacity for endurance enabled him to ride, carrying dispatches, in the fiercest winter weather, in a country swarming with cunning and merciless foes. In the first effort "he rode three hundred and fifty miles in less than sixty hours." In recognition of that wonderful achievement, General Sheridan made him "Chief of Scouts", and he was practically in the service thereafter until the close of General Miles' campaign in 1890, absenting himself upon his own affairs in time of peace but always rejoining the army when war threatened—as in the Custer campaign.

The Indians dreaded Buffalo Bill. In plain and mountain lore they knew him as at least their equal. He could not be surprised, entrapped, betrayed or evaded; no red man could bear better than he the extremes of cold, heat, fatigue, hunger and thirst; some of their bravest and best had fallen by his hand in personal conflict, man to man.

So, in the Wild West's war scenes, no less than in those of peace, their subject matter is still found in Buffalo Bill's exploits and experiences, each episode being a reproduction of a chapter in his life.

The scenes presented in its arena are lifelike in their realism because the participants in them are simply doing again what they at one time did daily in the ordinary routine of life, whether it was roping steers, breaking broncos, making camp, fighting Indians, or what not else. It is not to be denied that an exhibition constituted as is the Wild West labors under the one serious disadvantage that its continuance is limited by the practicability of obtaining men wo were actually plainsmen, pioneers, scouts, and Indian fighters. When the supply of that material is exhausted, which naturally cannot be put off to a very distant future, the Wild West will have to stop. However, until that time comes, it will continue to be, as it has been up to the present time, the largest, most original, exciting, effective, brilliant and magnificent entertainment inviting the interest of the public.

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COPYRIGHT 1902 BY The Courier Co. BUFFALO N.Y.

PERILS OF THE COWBOY

ROOSEVELT'S ROUGH RIDERS.

UNIQUE, superb and possessing an elan peculiarly their own, the Roosevelt Rough Riders really belong to the twentieth century. Recruited from all ranks of society, every avocation in American life, these Rough Riders combine the solidity of the trained cavalryman and the wild, headlong dash of the cattle-herders of the Western plains. Amenable to military discipline they were accustomed to act as individuals while in action. Ready to advance in line of battle on command, the men who served so gallantly under Leonard Wood and Theodore Roosevelt manifested a personal bravery only equaled by the Ironsides of Cromwell, the Cavaliers of King Charles, or the steel-clad horsemen of the great Gustavus of Sweden. Cowboys and plainsmen, college graduates and football heroes, they climbed the slopes of San Juan Hill and showed what Americans could accomplish when led by fearless commanders. The Rough Riders who appear in the Wild West Exhibition are recruited from the ranks of President Roosevelt's famous regiment, and all were present and fought from Siboney to Santiago. No finer body of horsemen could be found than these heroes of the Spanish-American war.

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MR. NATE SALSBURY, MANAGER AND DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE WILD WEST EXHIBITION.

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A GROUP OF ROOSEVELT'S ROUGH RIDERS, WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE BATTLE OF SAN JUAN HILL.

DAILY DALLIANCE WITH DEATH.

IT is an error to suppose the soldier's trade any more dangerous than certain avocations of peace. The chances are a thousand to one that the soldier going into battle will not be killed, an hundred to one that he will not even be hurt; but there is hardly one chance in a thousand that the cowboy, mixed up in a stampede herd of cattle on a dark night, will escape with his life, and certainly not one in ten thousand that he will live a minute if his pony falls with him there. There cannot be any call for duty in itself more terrifying than the cattle stampede. Thousands of powerful beasts, maddened by panic, suddenly start galloping at full speed in a straight course away from some imaginary danger. Their eyes blaze with frenzy, their long, sharp horns tossed aloft rattle like machinery, their labored breathing and panting is like the noise of many engines, and they move at an astonishing pace. The weaker among them, as they become exhausted, fall and are trampled to a bloody mire in a few seconds. If they come to a precipice, they go over it en masse. If a river crosses their path they plunge into it, drowning many. And all that usually happens at night and in storms.

To save the herd from self-destruction, the cowboys must get ahead of it and by yells, shots and blows turn the beasts away from a straight line, get them to moving in a circle—"milling"—if possible. The illustration shows what that involves. The man whose horse goes down in that fierce rush is doomed. The only hope of the men ahead of the herd is that they may gradually work their way to the edge of the current, and get outside its sweep when the circular swing is started. But before the cowboy can do that, his pony may be thrown off his feet by a frantic steer charging under him, or he may put a foot into a prairie-dog hole and the penalty for either is instant death. A number of years ago, Col. W. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Gen. E. A. Carr, U. S. A., on a buffalo hunt, became entangled in a panic-stricken herd of buffaloes and only saved their lives by working their way gradually to the thinnest side of the galloping mass and going with it down a bluff, over forty feet high, on the north fork of the Republican River.

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AN ACTUAL SCENE—SHOWING THE CANVAS, OPEN AIR PLAN AND CONSTRUCTION OF THE WILD WEST EXHIBITION—SEATS FOR 20,000 PEOPLE.

IN THE OPEN.

Health-Giving Recreation Under the Blue Dome of Heaven.

NOTE today the discussion of the learned sanitarians on the various methods to add to mankind's physical ability to avoid the "ills that flesh is heir to". Materia medica can prescribe, like the cobbler, matter for mending only, not for shielding. What are now the medicine man's injunctions? Light, air, outdoor amusement, outdoor exercise! From the baby carriage through school-day games to the tent in sickness; to the walk to the office; to ripe old age's carriage ride, the constant command is air, fresh air! It is a legal maxim that "ignorance of the law is no excuse against a penalty". It is the same with Nature's law. Among the first amusement enterprises to combine health with recreation was BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST, with its outdoor necessities; its spaciously grand open arena, where the play-ground of its rugged nomads was the earth's grassy sward, their only covering heaven's azure-tinted canopy. Differing in arrangement and manner of construction from all other methods used to accommodate multitudes of people, there is naturally an avoidance of the many ills attendant on contact with confined, stuffy, stifled, tainted atmosphere. With its unpoled acres of arenic space, it minimizes the dangers of sudden atmospheric disturbances and meets the requirements of the hygienic savants. The quadratic seating arrangement, with comfortable capacity for 20,000 persons, gives perfect view, and being covered by taut water-proof canvas, impossible of sagging, assures immunity from drenching in the heaviest rainstorms; and while protecting the spectator from the sun's fiercest rays, gives a physical gratification associated with a breeze-engendering colossal summer marquee. Thus can one enjoy this soul-stirring exhibition of the World's Wondrous Horsemen, and at the same time have a holiday that is really an outing. The accompanying picture is a photographic bird's-eye view taken at the Buffalo Pan-American Exhibition, and illustrates the detailed plan of construction as only can the camera; an instrument whose accuracy is assured, and presents an idea of the magnitude of the tented city and arena necessary for Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World.


LULLABIES ON THE PLAINS.

THE cowboy must be a vocalist, not merely enough of a singer to aggravate a choral disturbance, but able to give a solo performance.

A big, long-horned steer doesn't look nervous any more than a steam-engine, but he is timid as a bird and nervous as an old maid with a mouse in the room. He is liable to take fright at a fluttering leaf or scare himself into a panic by a dream. And the panic of one spreads with almost lightning-like rapidity to all the rest of the herd and sets them off in a wild stampede that may end in the death of scores of them and perhaps the killing of one or two cowboys. A thousand cattle lying down together to sleep on the plain are like a thousand boilers with badly banked fires under them, each liable, at any minute, to have its pressure suddenly rise to explosion point. Only one thing is likely to reassure and keep them quiet. All night long the cowboy herding them must ride slowly around them, singing continuously. He must not attempt any fancy vocalism, or anything lively and inspiriting. Operatic music, college songs, and sprightly rag-time melodies would be distinctly dangerous; and he doesn't want variety in either words or music. The old "Battle of the Nile", which has one hundred and forty-four verses, each like all the rest, would probably please him, if it were sung slowly. Here is one of the songs the cowboys sing:

"Lie quiet now, cattle,
Don't make any rattle.
But quietly rest till the morn',
For if you skedaddle,
We'll sure give you battle,
And head you as sure as you're born".

Often the weary cowboy, who may have been in the saddle many hours, sets his mouth going on the old song and pays no further attention to it until his time is up, and it is affirmed that some have been capable of sleeping soundly while riding about and singing. The cowboys in the Wild West do not claim such proficiency. They are wide-awake when anything is to be done, as the public will perceive.

 

THE LIFE-SAVING SERVICE.

THE world knows, by this time, that the title of the Wild West exhibition, is simply a trade-mark for a huge, thoroughly original and distinctively American institution, covering an infinitely wider field than its thrilling realistic presentation of the most stirring phases of Western life. All doughty deeds done by earnest, strong, virile men, individually or in association with others, for advancement, honor, patriotism or altruistic purpose, are within its province. Life, purposeful, vigorous human life, on the plains and [image] [inset] "PLACING APPARATUS" [inset] "RAISING THE CROTCH" [inset] "MAN THE BEACH CART" [inset] APPLYING HAWSER CUTTER. [inset] "HAUL OFF" [inset] "HAUL ASHORE" [inset] "HAULING OFF HAWSER" [inset] BREECHES BUOY The Enquirer Job Printing Co. Cin. O. THE U. S. LIFE-SAVING SERVICE—HEROES IN OIL SKINS. "MEN WHO WITHOUT THE CALL OF BUGLE, WITHOUT ANY OF THE FLASHING PARAPHERNALIA OF WAR, BRAVELY PLACE THEIR OWN LIVES IN THE BALANCE TO SAVE OTHERS". in the mountains, following the warpath and upon the battlefield, has been and ever will be its inexhaustible and infinitely diversified theme. That the energies of American life are most conspicuous in its illustrations is true to nature, for leadership is an inherency of Americans, but a fair showing is also given to the emulative efforts of all other peoples, whether in the arts of peace or in the stern discipline of war. Thus, year by year, the Wild West has grown greater, stronger in interest and richer in educational value.

This season it is enabled to present, as one of its intensely interesting, instructive and picturesque features, never before exhibited to the public, a display of the

Actual Work of the U.S. Life-Saving Service.

An entire crew selected from the model life-saving stations at Sandy Hook, Seabright, Monmouth Beach and Barnegat, with all their apparatus and appliances used in this service, have been engaged to give, in the Wild West, a realistic demonstration of the manner in which their heroic work is done under the most adverse conditions. Every man in this crew has a record.

The extraordinary interest belonging to such an exhibition as this will be better realized, when it is remembered that not one in ten thousand ever has an opportunity, in the ordinary course of events, to see the Life-Saving Service in action and that all the general public knows of it is from the meagre and inadequate newspaper reports chronicling the rescue of some ship-wrecked mariners. Even those who have been rescued are little likely to know much about what has been done to save them. Their recollections will be hardly more than a sort of confused waking nightmare of suffering, anxiety, horror and overwhelming joy at final rescue, in which objective consciousness has little part.

The life-savers' work is done on remote, tempest-swept beaches, generally in the most inclement season and certainly amid such a war of the elements as inhibits the most venturesome of sight-seers. In darkness and storm, each in turn plods weary miles up and down the beach, the patrol from each station meeting that from the one adjoining, so that the length of a dangerous coast is covered, all intently watching the tempestuous sea for a signal from some vessel in distress. Perchance a momentary lull in the gale allows the report of a gun to be heard, or the gleam of a rocket pierces the murky clouds, but often the first intimation of a vessel's imminent danger is the sight of her, by the lightning's glare or in the lurid light of a stormy dawn, on her beam-ends upon the sands, swept by the waves, with all on board who yet live clinging to the rigging, exhausted, helpless, dying.

The occasions are exceptional when a wreck can be reached from the shore, during a storm, by a life-boat and instant aid is imperatively necessary to save life. In this contingency the methods adopted are in every detail those that are to be seen in operation in the Wild West show, are indeed those which the men here illustrating them have repeatedly employed successfully in effecting rescues.

While some of the crew are securely bedding a sand-anchor to hold the hawser by which connection with the ship is to be made, others prepare the gun which is to throw across the vessel a shot carrying a light line, and others make ready the tackle and "whip" by which the breeches-buoy will be controlled on the hawser. The keeper fires the gun with such nice precision of aim that the line is carried to the vessel's mast. Those upon the wreck haul the hawser aboard and make it fast, also the "whip" or line for operating the breeches-buoy. The shore end of the tautened hawser is raised on a crotch, that persons hauled ashore may not be dragged through the waves and drowned. Then the breeches-buoy is made to travel out and back, each time bearing ashore the freightage of a human life. If those on the wreck are so far exhausted as to be incompetent for helping themselves in their part of its operation, one of the life-saving crew goes out to their aid and is last to leave the vessel.

BEWILDERING BEDOUINS.

THE troupe of Bedouin Arabs with Buffalo Bill's Wild West are not only wild and wondrous horsemen, but athletic gymnasts of a strange kind it would repay a journey across the great desert to see. They whirl their long muskets in the air until they look like cart-wheels spoked with a thousand sunbeams. [image] A BAND OF BEDOUIN ARAB HORSEMEN AND ATHLETES. They build of themselves high, living pyramids, with the agility of cats and the supple strength of tigers. They make eccentric rotary flights clear across the great arena that turn one's head to follow, and accomplish many other difficult feats.

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COPYRIGHT 1899 BY
The Courier Co.
BUFFALO, N.Y.

A GROUP OF FULLY EQUIPPED RUSSIAN COSSACKS.

THE RUSSIAN COSSACKS.

ON the wind-swept steppes of Northern Russia, amid the deep and gloomy passes of the Balkan Mountains, on the rock-ribbed sides of the Caucasian ranges, along the borders of Tartary, against the thundering squadrons of Napoleon, before the circling hosts of mounted Turks and opposed to the maddening rush of Tartar horsemen. the Cossacks have cut a deep notch in history, Accustomed from boyhood to the saddle these wild, mounted soldiers who serve the great white Czar seem more like centaurs than men. They fight with spear and saber and carbine. They ride down the enemy by sheer force, using their weapons with celerity and decision. Seated in their peculiar double-peaked saddles they can perform on the battlefield feats unequaled by circus riders. Formidable in encounter, they are simple and peaceful on the march or campaign. Rovers by nature and birth, the Cossack is a beau ideal horseman, a gallant soldier and a loyal subject to the Czar. They are the advance guard which ensures the safety of the Russian frontier. The men who appear with the Wild West Exhibition are veterans of many a hard-fought battle and skirmish.


THE MEXICAN VAQUEROS.

SOMEWHAT akin to the cowboy, the Mexican Vaquero is a herder, a scout or a hunter. Picturesque and often extravagant in his attire, the [image] GENUINE MEXICAN VAQUEROS. rough rider of Mexico betrays the influence of climate. Wild as a hawk and merciless as a cougar, he is the border policeman and the irregular soldier of our sister republic. His large, silver-laced hat, embossed demi-peaked saddle, large spurs and the rows of silver buttons on his close-fitting jacket, give the Vaquero a somewhat theatric air, but it is from the ranks of these men that the Government can, when necessary, draw its cavalry for war or defense. The men now with the Wild West Exhibition came from the Rio Grande, the plains of the Madre Sierras and the wide territory lying south of the City of Mexico.

THE BIG HORN DANCE.

OUT in the wild West, in Basin Big Horn,
The boys gave a dance that lasted 'till morn.
'Twas a "swarie" de hoof, still to memory dear,
Out in that country of horse, sheep and steer.
They had waltzes, quadrilles and two-steps galore
With the gals they had "bunched" in Cody's big store.
Old man Marquette, from above Irma Flat,
With the hair of the horse "ag-i-ta-ted the cat."
Before "first set" had reached their stand,
Softly floated from the Band
The stirring notes of "Dixie Land."
"Look here, Marquette!—do that no more,
Or the 'bunch'," said Gus, "will stampede shore."
As the notes of "Dixie" died away,
Floated out on the dying day,
Old Marquette turned to the fading light,
And in joyful tones floated on the night
"There'll be a Hot Time." Just then he called, "All set!"
And right there the fun began, you bet;
The voice of "Marque" caught rhythm and tone
As on the music it was borne.

"S'lute yer pardners, let 'er go,
Balance all and do-se-so,
Swing yer sweethearts and run away,
Right an' left an' gents sashay;
Back to pardner, turn an' swing,
That's right, folks, now that's the thing;
Ladies to right an' swing or cheat,
Now on to next gent an' repeat.
Here they are, boys, now don't be shy,
Swing yer pardner an' swing her high;
Now bunch the gals an' circle round,
Whack yer hoofs an' make 'em sound,
Form a basket an' all get gay,
Swing an' kiss an' break away.
Now, gents to right an' balance all,
Lift yer hoofs an' let 'em fall;
Swing yer op'sites, swing again,
An' kiss yer "honey" if yer kin;
Now back to pardners, do-se-do,
All join hands an' off yer go;
Now, gents, s'lute yer little sweets,
Hitch an' promenade to seats."

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THE WYOMING BRONCO BALL.

Thus the light, fantastic toe was tripped
'Till the sun up from behind McCullough slipped
And the snow on Cedar Mountain's height
Was tipped with morning's golden light.

Then, after the night's long exercise,
They horses mount 'neath morning skies,
Carrying "Cowboys" bold and their ladies fair,
In the streets the ponies paw the air.
"Old Marque" outside on the store-porch stood,
Playing "Home, Sweet Home," for good.
"A reel! a reel on horseback!" they cry,
While "broncos" prance with flashing eye.
And it was no sooner said
Than, with Gus and Ella at the head,
Two rows of riders fall in line,
While willing hooves on the ground beat time.
Then through the mazes of the reel,
'Mid shouts of laughter, peel on peel,
With steady hands upon the bit
And eyes with pure enjoyment lit,
With many a proud and lovelorn glance
The figures of the stately dance
Are each pranced through in bounding grace,
Each "bronc" held firm in his proper place;
Then home—the girls to sleep like weary birds,
The boys to follow the grazing herds.


SPEAKING of Buffalo Bill's Wild West to its youthful readers, Harper's Young People says: "In a few years, probably before many of the readers of the Young People have grown old, all this will be a reminiscence; the "Border" will be no more; there will be no necessity for a cowboy, little for the army, and the poor Indian will either have been absorbed with his land by the neighboring whites or killed off by diseases and civilization." These are among the very excellent reasons why the children should have a chance to visit Colonel Cody's remarkable, elevating and instructive, historical, ethnologic and enthralling exhibition.

The opportunity is now at hand; embrace it while you may.

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COL. CODY (BUFFALO BILL) IN CAMP.

 

JOHNNY BAKER, THE MARKSMAN.

THAT a youth who grew to manhood in the environment surrounding this most skillful young marksman should be a fine shot is not to be wondered at. The skill of Johnny Baker today is the result of being ever where the rifle was a necessity for safety, and an indispensable instrument with which to secure food.

"Old Lew Baker", the name by which Johnny Baker's father was known to freighters and emigrants who traveled the lonely trail up the Platte River before the days of the railroads, was one of those adventurous men who went into the heart of the country of the Sioux forty years ago, when eternal vigilance, a quick eye, a clear head, a brave heart, a good gun and a knowledge of how to use it, was the only bulwark for the safety and sustenance of himself and family. Out on the Platte, at a lonely road-side ranch, Johnny Baker was born. His first remembrance is of an Indian attack and repulse upon his home.

When the railroads came old man Baker moved to North Platte. Here the sturdy, manly little fellow, with a good eye for a gun, soon attracted the attention of Colonel Cody. He became the protégé of Buffalo Bill, practiced incessantly until today he stands without a rival as a rifle shot.

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MR. "JOHNNY" BAKER, THE CELEBRATED CRACK SHOT.
FOSTER SON AND PUPIL OF "BUFFALO BILL" AND THE ARENIC DIRECTOR OF THE WILD WEST EXHIBITION.

DO NOT MISS THE OPPORTUNITY.

COLONEL CODY has happily named his assemblage of horsemen "A Congress of the Rough Riders of the World". Here we see the war-painted red man, the last of his once formidable race. He rides his bareback mustang stripped to the waist and daubed with ochre, brilliant with beads and feathers. Next we have the American Cowboy, a rapidly diminishing remnant of a class which fought the Sioux, the Cheyennes, the Apache, the Pawnee and other desperate tribes. These plainsmen were the advance guard of the pioneer settlers. Besides watching their herds they rallied to the protection of emigrant trains and established trails over which the railroad tracks now extend. They hunted game for food, fought for territory foot by foot, and derived their generic title of "Cowboy" by herding enormous herds of half-wild cattle. The Vaquero comes from the hot, dusty plains of Mexico; the Gauchos come from the pampas of South America; the Cossack belongs to the steppes of Russia; the German Cuirassiers to the brilliant court of the great war lord of Europe; the United States Cavalry are fresh from barrack and camp; the Artillery from the seaboard posts. There is no deception, no imitation,—everything real, tried and true. This realism it is that makes the Wild West a school for the study of history, of life in many lands during the past and the present. It was a happy thought when Messrs. Cody and Salsbury decided on such an exhibition. In a few years its basic material must vanish, so the opportunity for visiting it now should not be missed, as especially to the young it is most instructive and to the old refreshingly reminiscent.

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WILD WEST GIRLS IN SPIRITED RACES AND FEATS OF HORSEMANSHIP.


THE TITLE PAGE.

NOTHING could be more indicative of the Wild West's connection with the artistic, picturesque and historic in American life than the title page of this year's ROUGH RIDER. In the foreground we have Col. Cody (Buffalo Bill) mounted on the famous war-horse "Duke", formerly owned and ridden by and presented to Col. Cody by General Miles, with the good-natured remark, "He is too much for me. You take him, Bill, and see if you can wear him out".

The Wild West's advent years ago and its touring of America and Europe gave to thousands of artists a vast studio of men, animals, costumes, action, customs, pose, single and in groups, most opportune, familiarizing a subject of intense interest to devotees of the brush, the pencil and the chisel. The knowledge of the West and its Rough Rider is strikingly exemplified in the republished cartoon from Punch of that model of Americanism, President Theodore Roosevelt, himself identified as one most experienced in the adventurous atmosphere of the early Northwest locators, and in which this foreign artist shows an accuracy in minuteness of detail that leave no doubt of the Wild West's valuable tuition. It might be well to note here, as showing how time flies, that President Roosevelt saw the Wild West Exhibition before camping as a ranchman and hunter among the foot-hills of the Rockies.

The lamented and ever-to-be-revered President McKinley was from its first presentation an enthusiastic patron of the Wild West (at Canton, Washington and Chicago), seeking relaxation from his arduous duties in the recreation it afforded. The snap-shot photograph on the title page is of interest from the fact that it is probably the only equestrian picture of the great soldier-statesman that is extant. Taken at the moment of mounting the spirited animal, it is preservative of his desire, even while heavily weighted with the executive duties of a vast expanding empire, to enjoy the exhilarating exercise of a canter in the capitol's suburbs. The Spanish-American war, creating an exhaustive demand on his time, preventing the further use of the white Kentucky charger (which belonged to General Miles), it was presented to Colonel Cody by his old commander. This horse is now with the organization, one of the few which fortunately escaped injury in last season's terrible railroad wreck, and is highly valued for its hallowed associations.

The picture of Colonel Cody is the very latest taken of him and is a splendid result of the photographic art.

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BUFFALO BILL AND SAN JUAN HILL

THE BATTLE OF SAN JUAN HILL.

Re-enacted in the Open Field.

THE presentation by Messrs. Cody and Salsbury of the great realistic arenic drama of the capture of San Juan Hill proved the greatest sensation in amusement history.

Coming as it did as a finale to the great program which introduced the world's soldiers and the Indian fighters, it was a fitting climax and one which stirred every drop of blood in the veins of each spectator.

From its first presentation in New York until the close of the season, so enthusiastic were the audiences and so numerous the people (running far into the thousands) who were turned away at every performance, that Messrs. Cody and Salsbury have, in deference to the universal demand, retained it as a leading feature of this year's entertainment.

The facilities that this enterprise gives for such a realistic exhibition far exceeds those of any other extant, as in its stupendous arena the makers of history have anticipated and surpassed its chroniclers, with living, exact, reproductive illustrations of the most daring and sensational episodes in the closing scenes of the grand martial drama of American civilization, introducing as lighter adjuncts the mounted rivalries and odd, picturesque and sturdy pastimes of the very palefaces and redskins who met face to face and fought hand to hand under Miles, Merritt, Sitting Bull, Red Cloud and other great captains and savage chiefs, and a Congress of Rough Riders of the World, whose magnificent feats of diversant horsemanship form the most electrifying and extraordinary exhibition of the kind ever compassed, or that will ever be presented in one assemblage. Furthermore, possessed of physical material which cannot be duplicated, because the emergencies of border warfare and pioneer progress which called it into being are forever past; of over a thousand men and horses, of contributions of regular troops, batteries of field guns, and arms and equipments from foreign powers and its own government; with a field of action more ample than that of a score of circuses, or a hundred theatres, it has been enabled to first introduce, upon a scale of commensurate magnitude and genuine composition, warlike reviews, spectacles and tableaux, and even tremendously grand and effective scenes of important battles, reaching such overwhelming, heroic heights of realism incarnate that all preceding stage military displays were by comparison forever relegated to the lowest level of the most puerile travesty. Among these chivalric triumphs may be casually mentioned its conspicuously powerful and splendid reproduction of General Custer's Last Battle; an achievement so entirely surpassing all previous attempts of the kind that it may truthfully be said to have established a new standard and epoch in military exploitation, which the quotation
"The morn, the marshaling in arms,—the day,
Battle's magnificently stern array!"
may be appropriately applied to.

In the Wild West arena again this season that marvelous apotheosis of the lamented Custer, which swept vast audiences everywhere to the pinnacle of excitement and enthusiasm, is to be superseded by the spectacular celebration of a more recent event; of a heroic feat of arms, the news of which caused the great heart of the Nation to swell and pulsate with pride and joy and thankfulness; of a charge more desperate and successful than that of the Old Guard at Waterloo, magnificently participated in by a regiment
Immortalizing the Name "Rough Riders",
coined by Colonel Cody for his exhibition, and borrowed therefrom by the public to appropriately rechristen the First Regiment of Volunteer Cavalry, which was mainly made up of the class of scouts and trappers with which Buffalo Bill's Wild West has made the civilized world familiar; many of whom went from its arena to the larger one of the war in Cuba, and have again returned to it, bringing large accessions of their intrepid comrades and scores of their broncos, to give additional interest and verisimilitude to the introduction of an extraordinarily lifelike, effective and vivid facsimile of the crowning and conclusive incident in
The Famous Fight of San Juan where, to the utter amazement of the military world, and in valiant reversal of all accepted tactical authorities, a thin line of infantry, unsupported by artillery, charged upon and routed a superior force, strongly intrenched on a difficult eminence behind artillery protected breastworks and armed with the dreaded Mauser and smokeless powder. It was an incredible achievement, performed by the bravest of the brave, who made a sport of death in its accomplishment. The realistic re-enactment of such a fearless charge and [image] Scene I.—THE BIVOUAC THE NIGHT BEFORE THE BATTLE OF SAN JUAN HILL. desperate struggle is calculated to arouse public curiosity and enthusiasm to the white heat of patriotic fervor, and the introduction of military incidents preceding it, upon the broadest and most accurate lines of army movements, discipline and life, and by the very heroes who were a part of what they portray, will present to the eyes of peace.

A Battle Lesson, Illustration and Revelation
to be vividly remembered for a lifetime, unprecedented in even the Wild West's previous unparalleled productions, and utterly impossible to [image] Scene II.—THE ROUGH RIDERS' HEROIC CHARGE AT SAN JUAN HILL. AS REPRODUCED IN BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST. any other organization and management. An important factor, too, in its successful presentation is the fact that both Colonel Cody and Mr. Nate Salsbury are war veterans, thoroughly familiar, through severe experience, with war in its sternest practical features, and fully competent to command and manage the hundreds of men and horses required and utilized.

The task confronting the management has been a herculean one, involving an expense, infinity of detail, labor of comparison and investigation, procuring of genuine material, arrangement of scenery, relation of circumstances and effective utilization of the space at command and indispensable to the maneuvers of so many men, horses and guns, that it is a matter for mutual congratulations the grand results attained so fully and faithfully harmonize with the facts of history and the details and actual environments of an army on the march, in camp, and on the field of battle.

A Scenario of the Spectacle.
The events associated with the battle of San Juan will be presented in two scenes, in the first of which the bivouac of the troops on the road to San Juan, the night before the battle will be shown.

The Invading American Forces,
composed of the artillery representing Grimes's Battery, the mule pack train carrying ammunition, the U.S. Regulars, Roosevelt's Rough Riders, the 71st Infantry, the Cuban scouts and guides, is seen at sunset, at the conclusion of a desperately hard day's march over rough and jungle-choked trails, under the blistering rays of a tropical sun, moving into the encampment selected for a resting place, on the night preceding the morrow's grim work. The various commands take up the positions assigned them, and to the spectator the bivouac presents a most warlike and novel scene of disciplined bustle and preparation. The sentries are posted, the tired animals unloaded, unharnessed and picketed, the weary soldier boys gladly obey the order to stack arms, and relieved of their haversacks and cumbersome accouterments loll and lie around in groups, while the campfires are lighted and preparations for the evening meal quickly made. The hard-tack and coffee disposed of and the stern hand of discipline temporarily relaxed, they indulge in an al fresco "smoker" and forget their toils and dangers in story, song and jest; the familiar songs and patriotic anthems of home, as chorused in melodious and stentorian tones from hundreds of throats, wafted toward doomed Santiago on the balmy wings of the night winds, and sounding singular and solemn on that vast natural stage, heretofore a stranger to the uxultant notes of Freedom's sons. Night creeps on more stealthily than a Spanish guerrilla through the dense encircling foliage, until taps give warning that the hour for sleep and silence has struck. Soon the entire command, with the exception of the watchful outposts, reclining on mother earth's broad bosom, and canopied by the starry heavens, is wrapped in merciful oblivion, or beguiled by dreams of distant loved ones. And, alas! many a noble fellow slumbering so peacefully there will, ere another sun has set, fall fighting into that sleep that knows no awakening, after recording in his own life-blood his name upon the scroll of his country's heroes. At length [image] COL. THEODORE B. (NOW PRESIDENT) ROOSEVELT WHO LED THE "ROUGH RIDERS" IN THE FAMOUS CHARGE AT SAN JUAN, '98. "Night wanes; the vapors, 'round the mountain curled,
Melt into morn and light awakes the world,"
the sharp rattle of the reveille arouses the camp to preparation for the onward march, and the scene closes with the advance of the army toward the stronghold of San Juan.

The Rough Riders' Immortal Charge.
The second scene reveals the regiments already named, massed in the forks of the trail at the foot of San Juan Hill, a most exact and effective representation and reproduction of which is introduced, showing the blockhouse, the breastworks, the rifle pits, and the natural and apparently insurmountable difficulties our soldiers were obliged to encounter and overcome in their final and victorious assault. From the fancied impregnability of their position, the superior Spanish force is seen pouring an incessant torrent of shrapnel and Mauser bullets into our exposed ranks, which choke up the narrow trail beyond the hope of extrication, and apparently beyond the possibility of escape. It is an hour of supreme trial and agony, in a veritable hell-pit and snare. The situation renders division and brigade commanders powerless and maneuvering impossible. Retreat they cannot; to remain is destruction, and to advance, according to all precedent and estimation, but speedier annihilation. But, casting theories, dictums and doubts to the winds, contemptuously fearless of conspicuous exposure, with splendid intrepidity, assuming and divining that what must be done can be done, Colonel Theodore B. Roosevelt of the Rough Riders, on horseback, presses to the foot of the death-swept hill and calling upon the men to follow him, rides straight up and at the fortressed foe. There is a frantic yell of admiration and approval as the soldiers—white, red and black—spring from their cowering position of utter helplessness and follow him and the flag. The Spaniards cannot believe that so small a force would dare an assault so forlorn of all hope. They erroneously infer that an army is charging close behind it, and as it breathlessly comes closely on for a hand-to-hand death grapple, they pale, they flinch, and at last they turn and fly in panic. Their gold and crimson emblem of ruthless oppression is torn from the ramparts and Old Glory streams on the breeze, triumphant in its place—their defenses are turned against themselves, and Santiago is doomed.


Buffalo Bill's Wild West exhibitions are given in the largest entertainment arena in the world, with a seating capacity for 20,000 people, who will be sheltered amply from the rain or sun, although there are no tents for the winds to dangerously sport with.

 

EARTH'S FAVORED FARM-YARD.

Mineralists' Magic Mecca—Humanity's Health Haven.
A New Railroad Rattles the Rockies.

OMAHA, Neb., Nov. 12, 1901.—The Burlington Railroad ran its first train into the "Metropolis of the Big Horn Basin", the town of Cody, Wyo., at 10 A.M. today. The train was crowded with prominent business men of Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska, among them Senator Clark, Col. W. F. Cody, state and railroad officials. Hundreds greeted the arrival of this, the first train in the Valley of the Shoshone, and celebrated the occasion with a grand barbecue and speech-making during the day and with fireworks and a grand ball at night. This branch of the great Burlington system taps a new and almost unknown territory as large as the State of Massachusetts, and halts at the foot-hills of the Rocky Mountains, forty miles from the southeast corner of the Yellowstone National Park.

[map]

CONSULT THIS OFFICIAL MAP OF THE "GREAT BURLINGTON ROUTE"
DEFINING THE EXACT LOCATION OF THE BIG HORN COUNTRY AND TOWN OF CODY, WYOMING.

The Big Horn "Basin" is really a valley, or the bed of an ancient lake, named such because entrance to the same was possible only over four mountain walls, or quadrilateral branches of the great Rocky Mountain Range. These inclose an area as large as the State of Massachusetts, the Snowy Range or Pryor Mountains protecting it on the north from the frigid zephyrs of the arctic; on the east the Big Horn Mountains; on the south the Shoshone Mountains, and on the west that portion of the rugged Rockies which includes the world's wonderland, the Yellowstone National Park and the massive Teton Range. This singular architectural construction by Nature, with perpetual snow-capped peaks, with virgin forests surrounding it on all sides, produces a climatic condition not duplicated anywhere else on earth.

To these impregnable, eternally unchangeable, colossal protective guardians can be attributed the influence that goes to make it in many ways the most peculiar of all the mountain-locked vales known to man, and contributes to it a combination of commercial, agricultural, pastoral, mineral, and hygienic virtues inestimable. These cloud-topped towers thus modify in winter the frigid intensity associated with other locations in northern latitudes, accumulate the snows and absorb the rain-clouds to eventually distribute in various directions the aqueous fluid via the many mountain streams that ripple down their precipitous sides to the valley below—a valley rich beyond comparison with all others in depth of alluvial soil formed by the silt of ages that was once the seabed but now, like a nutritious "extract", available in producing miraculous results for the husbandman and capable of furnishing productive homes (80 acres apiece) for 65,000 families. The snow-fed streams, the Big Horn, the Kirby, the Nowood, the Shell, Owl, Greybull, Wood River, the Clark Forks, and the Shoshone River, with a crystal purity filtered in the struggle from their mountain sources, rushing for centuries through this pound-cake soil, have cut down to the bed rock, rendering necessary artificial raising to the surface to utilize their value through that most perfect of all methods for agricultural results—irrigation; the Shoshone River alone furnishes more water for the artificial canals without perceptibly diminishing its volume than is used in all Eastern Colorado. The mountain forests, being protected as Government Timber Reserves, form a natural reservoir (lacking the expense and danger of an artificial one) assuring a water supply throughout the year, accentuated in summer when most needed, fed from the great springs which gush from a thousand cliffs and by the melting snows from the perpetual drifts among the craggy peaks, giving an illimitable supply that is eternal; in fact, of sufficiency beyond the demands of irrigation, leaving an ample surplus of water power for mills and factories in the future, to add varied industries to this much-favored spot—the Shoshone having a fall of thirty-one feet to the mile for seventy-five miles. Think and ponder what possibilities!

Irrigation, from the time of the ancients, has been recognized as the only sure method of certain agricultural results, but this valley excels all other propositions of the kind from the fact that its limited rainfall prevents any chance of overwatering, which sometimes occurs where rain is uncertain and at times superabundant.

Col. W. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Mr. Nate Salsbury are among the leaders in the Shoshone Irrigation Company, having canals and ditches already in operation from the mountain headwaters to the growing town of Cody. These canals are now working with amazing effect, proving that every cereal grown in the temperate zones will yield prodigiously. The varied elevations of the valley, mesas and benches make the possibilities of husbandry illimitable and such that the products of many climes and countries may be successfully cultivated.

Stock raising of cattle, horses, sheep and swine have great possible advantages, as the hills and mountain-sides furnish free ranges clothed with nutritious grasses the year 'round, and stock can roam unsheltered the entire winter and be fat and marketable in the Spring.

As to minerals, imagination only can speculate and energy alone develop the future possibilities, as its location in the center of an already developed mineral Golconda, and the indications advanced by present-known deposits of coal, marble, saltpetre, sulphur, iron, gypsum, asphalt, lead, copper, silver, gold, etc., give promise of it being a great future mining center.

The annual wool crop at present is nearly four million pounds, which emphasizes the fact that Cody is even now a great trading center and bound to become a large manufacturing and distributing point for freight caravans from it for many years to come.

Several new bridges over rivers are in course of construction and the material is now easily transported by the railroad facilities. A new wagon and stage road, assisted by a liberal appropriation from the Unites States Congress, is being built which will reach through the Yellowstone National Park from the City of Cody to the lower end of the Park Lake, where boats can be taken to the magnificent hotels located in this most picturesque of Nature's scenic marvels. This gives, for the first time, a southern outlet into or out of the Park, which has hitherto been accessible only from the north via Livingstone, thus affording the lover of nature a grander and more magnificent tour in his home country than is furnished by the Alps or famed Switzerland.

As for big game, this is the last of the hunters' paradises rendered famous by President Roosevelt, while the pictures of Remington and other great artists have made it the dreamland of the Nimrod; because of the nearness of the Yellowstone Park, and for the reason that game is protected all the year from hunters in the Park. As a result Big Horn sheep, antelope, deer, elk, grizzly bear, and mountain lions are increasing in all the region contiguous to the Park. Hunters will find competent guides at Cody who will not fail to show them such game as they desire to hunt.

HEALTH.—All this concentrated wealth of resources is but a by-product when compared to the extraordinary health-giving properties of its climate, and its various mineral springs. Hot, sulphur, soda and iron springs pervade the valley, which make it a natural medicinal laboratory, supplying as it were the phenomena for which the Yellowstone National Park is famous, it being in reality the basic supply for the geysers and wonderful springs of the Park. Here the curative ingredients are intensified in strength beyond all that of any known springs in either Europe or America. The most noted are the springs two miles from the town of Cody, known as the De Maris Springs, but which have now been taken over for improvement by the Burlington Company and will be hereafter known as the Shoshone Springs. The Company are now erecting the proper bath-houses and hotels. Some of these springs are hot, some cold, clear as crystal, sparkling as the finest champagne; surcharged with gases heavier than any manufactured waters; tickling to the taste, and most agreeably palatable. They are so strongly impregnated with soda, magnesia, iron, potassium iodide, sulphur, etc., that the river for a long distance below them shows the effects of the minerals in the beautiful colors deposited on the rocks. The waters as a beverage and for bathing purposes are most popular where known. The cures of blood, skin and stomach disorders effected by their use are almost miraculous.

Thousands of acres in this valley are now for sale under the United States Government Geary Act, and for information regarding same communications should be addressed to Geo. T. Beck, Cody, Wyo. For information as to Cody, business lots, etc., address C. H. Morrill, President Lincoln Land Co., Lincoln, Neb.

For information regarding the springs, trips to the Park, hunting, etc., address John H. Martin, Cody, Wyo.

The advent of the Burlington Railroad gives the home, wealth and health seeker facilities to visit, view and verify.

 

BUFFALO BILL'S RETREAT.

THE photographic views on this page illustrate the central camp and expedition of one of the latest hunting trips in the Rocky Mountains, being taken last December, 1901, at the top of the Great Divide. The central picture is a splendid scene in the natural park just [photo] [photo] BIG GAME IN THE BIG HORN BASIN—AN ACTUAL HUNTING SCENE. twenty miles south of the line of the Great Yellowstone National Park and about fifty miles from the growing town of Cody. The Great Divide derives its name from the fact [photo] COL. CODY AT THE FOOT OF "PAHASKA BUTTE". that at this point the waters that bubble within a few feet of each other ripple down different sides of the mountains in all directions and are doomed to contribute to more distant rivers, seas and shores than Nature's aqueous flow from any other location. From within a few feet water runs eastward eventually to the Yellowstone, Missouri, Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico, to the Atlantic and through the Gulf Stream to bathe the shores of Denmark, England, Norway, Sweden and Russia; and westward to the Columbia River, the Pacific, to the shores of India; to the southward to the Colorado, the Gulf of California, the shores of South America and the frozen Antarctic; and northward through various channels [photo] INDIAN CHIEFS IRON TAIL AND BLACK FOX, THE GUESTS OF COL. CODY (BUFFALO BILL). to the Red River Country, to Hudson's Bay to form icebergs at the North Pole. To this section Colonel Cody retreats when the season finishes to seek recreation and the health-restoring qualities to be found here. A view of the camp renders no further excuse for his actions necessary. Accompanied by some old scouts from the Indian Territory and a delegation of Ogallalla Sioux Indians, Colonel Cody spent a delightful time and secured some magnificent specimens of deer, bear, elk, and small game. This locality is the last of the natural big game preserves and has been made famous to readers of American history by President Roosevelt in his many writings on this subject, as it was the theater of his early training as a hunter.

It is here that all kinds of big game, such as elk, deer, bear, mountain sheep and other rare specimens, abound.

[photo]

CAUGHT IN THE ACT—A KODAK SNAP SHOT.

 

THE LIVELY LOOP.

THE one thing readily learned and never forgotten by even the worst of the bad broncos is the unwisdom of fighting against the rope. The instant in which the snaky coil of a lariat—or lasso—settles about his neck or tautens on one of his legs, the brute stops and behaves himself until it is cast off. Against man, saddle and bridle he will fight madly, even risking his neck and limbs in savage fury, but he knows what the rope can do to him and fears it. Cattle, too, there is good reason to believe, not only learn by experience a wholesome respect for the rope but actually spread their knowledge among their fellows, so that a cowboy whirling his lariat about his head may start a panic in a lot of steers, not one of [photo] COPYRIGHTED 1901 BY WILLIAM H. RAU SEÑOR VINCENTE OREPEZO. THE WORLD'S GREATEST LARIAT THROWER. which has ever been roped except perhaps when it was a calf.

The lariat comes to us from Mexico, but is used today as effectively by our American cowboys as it ever was by vaqueros in real work. The Mexicans perhaps excel in fancy use of it, and Señor Vincente Orepezo, who is one of the Wild West features, shows the limit of their accomplishments. It is truly marvelous how, in his magical manipulation, the loop of the hempen line widens and contracts at his will, soars in a great floating ring high overhead, glides serpent-like near the ground, rises and falls about him, and finally, darting away, loops itself unerringly upon the passing man or beast at whom it may be directed.

Herding cattle upon the great Western and Southwestern plains without the aid of the lariat would be [image] impossible unless some substitute were adopted, such as the bolas of the South American guachos, which are much more cruel. But the lariat may be so used as to throw running animals with great violence, and this occasionally results in the breaking of a horn or leg of a steer in the competitive roping trials frequent among the cowboys of Arizona and Texas. Of course such occurrences are carefully guarded against in the Wild West arena, but are not to be wondered at where efforts are being made to lower the "roping and tying" record by a few seconds.

[photo]

WILD MUSTANGS

Joe Bassett, the champion cowboy and bronco buster of Arizona, recently threw and tied two steers, one in 33-1/2 and the other in 43 seconds, in a public contest, giving each one thirty yards start. In such hurried work there is no time for gentleness and the steers are liable to be slammed down very hard, especially if they are vigorous and wild. The sport is one that demands quick brain, agile muscles and steady nerves more than any other, even bull-fighting. Horse and rider must work together or failure is the inevitable result, and failure at times means death if a savage steer gets to his feet before the tie is made.

Although the lariat ordinarily used is only forty feet long and the roping is done within easy reach, exceptionally strong and skillful men are occasionally found whose ropes are double that length and who throw their loops successfully forty or fifty feet. It would seem to admit of no question that such long ropes would be particularly desirable in lassoing bears, a sport much appreciated by adventurous cowboys. Two working together are pretty certain to capture a brown or black bear, and one may do so, but now and then the mistake is made of attempting to rope a grizzly, when "Ephraim" is likely to sit down on his haunches and hauling on the rope hand over hand, while he licks his chops in anticipation, pulls the pony and its rider within his reach—provided the man doesn't cut loose.


COWBOYS AND "OUTLAW" BRONCOS.

THE cowboy finds it neither unexpected, unreasonable nor disagreeable when he is called upon to do hard and dangerous things. He philosophically considers that they "all go in the day's work", and belongs to a type of men to whom the consciousness of conquering is as wine in the blood. There is nothing more elastic than a cowboy's "day's work". It commences at any time when he can be waked up and ends when there is nothing more to do. Not infrequently, after being in the saddle all day, tiring out half a dozen or more tough broncos in succession, and "riding herd" a couple of hours in the evening, he may be roused out of his first doze to mount and gallop after the cattle that have been stampeded by a storm.

Each cowboy in the "outfit" must have a "string" of six to ten remounts ready for service at all moments. Accidents happen to them, making vacancies in the "string" and there must be other steeds competent to take up the broncos' burden on call. The breaking or "busting" of a bronco is one thing; his education another.

It occasionally happens that a bronco has been repeatedly roped and ridden just enough to demonstrate that he could be handled if required but has never been [photo] COWBOYS FUN actually "broken"—i.e., made to recognize man as his master at will—and for some reason has been passed over in each draft for service. There are also, in almost every herd of broncos, some deservedly distinguished as "outlaws", animals that have altogether escaped men's hands until they are too old to be broken without very great difficulty. They fight with maniac frenzy, often with furious determination, to kill the men who attempt riding them, or to effect their own destruction rather than submit to subjugation. The more savage they become the more amusing they are to the cowboys, so instead of being shot for their hides—the best economic use that could be made of them—they are kept "to have fun with" when there is leisure for sport. Of course the acme of enjoyment in their use is when a "tenderfoot" can be induced to mount one of them, but that is a rare delight. Ordinarily the fun consists in competitive tests in roping, bridling, saddling and riding the vicious beasts, exactly as it is shown in the arena of Cody and Salsbury's Wild West.

 

CUBAN PATRIOTS.

[photo]

ESTRADA PALMA, PRESIDENT OF CUBA.

CUBA Libre—Free Cuba! Independent, with Uncle Sam as a fraternal protector close at hand, with natural resources and climatic beauties making it the richest spot on earth, what a future, what wealth, what happiness awaits any man's conservative wisdom in its management—to create an earthly paradise, a terrestrial Garden of Eden! Much therefore depends on the leading political steersmen that are to handle the helm—control the tiller; [image] much also depends on the crew, the masses, to conduct the ship to the safe harbor of plentiful, peaceful repose.

In the Hon. Estrada Palma, the sterling Cuban patriot, long schooled in the political conservatism of the United States, knowing the wants politically and economic of the island, a navigator has been secured whose influence and intelligence should bring about results long prayed for in the "Queen of the Antilles". Without doubt Estrada Palma, head of the Cuban Junta, was as strong a factor in the ending of Spanish rule as even the most heroic of Cuba's many dashing soldiers.

Ably seconded by the indefatigable Señor Gonzales Quesada, resident representative at Washington, results were accomplished which will make them historic characters for all future time. General Palma will be President and Señor Quesada, probably, Secretary of State. How different from a few years ago—in the dark days just before the late war!

To assist the Cuban cause Messrs. Cody and Salsbury secured a detachment of wounded patriots from the Cuban army and attached them to the Wild West Exhibition. Their presence created great enthusiasm and their exploitation accomplished invaluable good.

Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, then Consul-General (on a visit to Washington), General Palma, Señors Quesada, Albertine, General Nunez, this group of insurgents, a group of U.S. Cavalry, surrounding Colonel Cody, the Starry Flag and Cuban Ensign entwined, were photographed— [photo] SEÑOR CEPERO, A CUBAN PATRIOT. a picture of pantomimic patriotic prayer, that was soon answered. In the next year the Wild West gave the public the climax in a representation of the successful battle of San Juan Hill. Grateful for the Wild West's influence a detachment of wounded Cuban patriots have been delegated to tour with the Wild West, to give that genuine atmosphere so identified with Buffalo Bill's historic pictures. A squad lends interest this season to the great battle scene of the charge up San Juan Hill, the diorama having added interest by the presence of participating Roosevelt Rough Riders. We present photos of General Palma, Señor Quesada and a specimen of the heroic men who charged with Garcia, Marti, Gomez and Maceo behind the drapeau of Cuba Libre and assisted, materially, in bringing about the very amicable relations which we now enjoy.

WARM FRIENDS.

"THE judiciary reception is the most dignified social event at the White House. The reception was, in fact, like a wheel within a wheel. The Chief Justice and his colleagues on the illustrious bench, when they had been received by the President, proceeded to the East Room, and there they held receptions of their own. Col. WM. F. CODY, "Buffalo Bill", of Wild West fame, was among the guests, and when he reached the receiving party the President gave him a heartier welcome than he had extended to any guest during the evening. The President seized both his hands and shook them vigorously, all the while voicing his delight at seeing the famous Westerner once again."—Post, Washington, January 15, 1902.

[photo]

"CUBA LIBRE"—SAN JUAN HILL.

CONCERNING ROUGH RIDERS.

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT says it was never intended that the regiment raised by him and in which he served with such distinction in the Spanish-American war of 1898, should be called the "Rough Riders". It was formally officially christened the "First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry". Possibly there was just a little to be proud of in the fact that it was the "First", but the men of that command were recognized by the country at large as individually and [photo] SEÑOR QUESADA, DIPLOMAT. collectively "first" in various ways much more important than mere numerical order. They were "first" as athletes, horsemen, sharp-shooters, scouts and all-around fighters, and "Teddy" was "first" among them.

Of course the regiment had to have a distinctive title, something familiar and appropriate—a sort of pet name. Somebody had the happy idea of giving to it the name already popularized all over this country and Europe by Col. W. F. Cody as descriptive of the highest type of horsemen—those [photo] U. S CAVALRY PRACTICE DRILL. daring, vigorous and skillful riders whom he has brought together from all quarters of the globe and introduces to the public as his "Congress of Rough Riders of the World" in the Wild West Show. The title was an inspiration. People and press adopted it at once. Everybody talked of "Roosevelt's Rough Riders" and almost anybody would have had to think twice before answering any question about the "First U. S. Volunteer Cavalry". In vain Roosevelt protested, remonstrated and corrected people. When finally the War Department got to addressing official orders to the "Rough Riders", having adopted the popular title, he gave up his contest against fate and thenceforth accepted the name uncomplainingly.

The Standard Dictionary, unquestionably good authority, gives due credit to Colonel Cody for the application and popularization of the appellation as follows:

"Rough Rider; U. S.—One skilled in the roughest style of horsemanship; one accustomed to perilous feats of horseback riding, as in the breaking of broncos, or the horseback athletics of the Cossacks.

"The name became familiar through Col. Wm. F. Cody's (Buffalo Bill) 'Congress of the Rough Riders of the World' and afterwards through 'Roosevelt's Rough Riders',—the popular designation of the 1st U. S. Volunteer Cavalry in the Spanish American war of 1898".


[image]

"THE great feature of the Wild West is its men—the splendid, manly, plucky, men. One cannot help loving every sunburned, dusty one of them. As for the Wild West, it is enough to say that its glory is undimmed. It is a show of men and a show containing more sand, grit and pluck to the square inch than any other combination that ever came over the road. 'An' this goes,' as they say in the cow camp".—E. Hough, Author of "The Story of the Cowboy".


AT the night exhibitions of Buffalo Bill's Wild West the arena is lighted most brilliantly by an electric plant of two hundred and fifty thousand candle power, the largest portable apparatus of the kind ever manufactured.

[image]

HUNTING BUFFALO. THE LAST OF THE BUFFALO. THE ONLY LIVING HERD.

 

THE UNITED STATES CAVALRYMEN.

THE years of employment of the cavalry arm of the service of the United States troops on the frontier in Indian warfare has developed a body of men not excelled in the world as light cavalrymen. To the discipline and training of the army he has been compelled to add the accomplishments of the scout and cowboy, and the combination is a complete success. His uniform is not of the showy and eye-pleasing character but it is serviceable and exactly suited to the needs of the wearer.

[photo]

THE ARRIVAL OF THE EXHIBITION TRAINS.

THE COSSACK.

THE world has never produced a more aptly named horseman than the Cossack—meaning Free Lance—originally a native of the borderland between Europe and Asia, leading a roving life, his courage and skill as a horseman and fighter led to his alliance with the Russian Czar to fight his hereditary foe, the Turk, and quickly his fearlessness and loyalty to the throne earned him the title of "the life of the Tsar". Riding the peculiar saddles of their country, they seem equally at ease riding, standing, swinging from or seated in their saddles; using rifle, pistol or sword with equal and marvelous rapidity and effectiveness, they are formidable enemies to encounter.

ROOSEVELT'S ROUGH RIDERS.

ARE veterans of the most extraordinary military organization of modern times. Resigning his position as an Assistant Secretary of War, Colonel Roosevelt quickly gathered around him a band of cowboys, scouts and plainsmen, and led them, as no one but a born leader could have led such apparently discordant elements, to the capture of San Juan Hill.

The mingled elements recruited from the West, supplemented by the football players of the great colleges, made a record which will last as long as the history of the Spanish war is told in song or story.

[photo]

THE BUFFALOES ON THE WAY TO THE LOT.

THE COWBOY

IS absolutely a law unto himself. While he shares many of his virtues in common with other men, particularly those who live on the borders of civilization, yet he has many admirable qualities which are wholly his own. He lives his life largely alone; his bovine charges for his only companions, except his horse. He risks his life daily in the discharge of his duties with a nonchalance born of familiarity with danger which has all the force of habit. He is generous with the generosity of a sailor, accumulating money by hardship, and receiving it at the threshold of opportunity for its disbursement.

AMERICAN INDIANS.

THE Rough Riders, collected from all the continents of the world, vary widely in their styles of riding and their accouterments, but the North American Indian, the terror of our forefathers, and of all the pioneers who pushed the borders of civilization Westward to the Pacific Ocean, is pre-eminently the rough rider of the world, for he rides the wild horse of the plains bareback, without either saddle or bit.

A halter of the horse's hair, and his own hide are all the paraphernalia he needs. He rides on top or on one side or both; he walks or runs beside his horse, on the off side or the near, and when he [photo] BUFFALO BILL GETS A CINDER IN HIS EYE. lists he walks behind and holds his tail to steer. His wealth he measured in horseflesh, which was his principle circulatiug medium, and one from which he sometimes separated an original owner, while at gaming, or mayhap while he slept and slumbered.

MEXICAN RURALIES.

THE sister republic, which adjoins our territory on the south, contributes to the world's roughest riders her quota of Ruralies, who occupy the same relation to her government as the Mounted Police do to the Canadian people.

The product of a country with a civilization lost in the mists of antiquity they typify all the picturesque and brilliant features of life below the Rio Grande.

The sugar-loaf hat, silver-trimmed, as are the spurs and high-pommelled saddle, velvet embroidered and bespangled jacket, his superb horsemanship, like that of the cowboy, and his matchless skill in [photo] COLONEL CODY (BUFFALO BILL), DIRECTING THE PERFORMANCE. throwing the lasso, a necessary accomplishment practiced from childhood, all contribute to make him one of the most picturesque figures the world can produce.

GERMAN CUIRASSIERS.

THE famous Garde Cuirassíers, familiarly and affectionately known as the "White Guard of the Kaiser", and in whom "the war lord of Europe" delights more than in any other of the countless regiments which make up the vast standing army of "der Vaterland", are adequately represented in the aggregation of the world's soldiers presented by the Wild West. These men are selected from the various cavalry regiments of the German army and their brilliant trappings and athletic appearance account for the affectionate regard in which they are held by the whole people, as well as by the Kaiser.

UNITED STATES ARTILLERY.

IN flying light artillery, with which the enemy can be pursued almost as rapidly as by cavalry, the commanding general of an army possesses today an advantage not dreamed of in the long ago. The skill with which these fieldpieces are driven constitutes one of the most fascinating and exciting incidents of the Wild West Exhibition. The guns are brought into the arena, and the drill of harnessing and unharnessing the horses, limbering and unlimbering the guns is illustrated, and then they are driven around as they would be if in pursuit of a flying enemy. To convey an object lesson as to the skill of the drivers and their absolute control over their horses and guns, they are driven at full speed between loosely set willow wands, with only a leeway of a few inches in which to pass, and never disturb a single barrier.

THE ARABS,

SOUTH American Gauchos and other horsemen, heretofore identified with the Wild West, will fill out and complete the Roster of the horsemen of the world, and all will be under the leadership of the famous hunter, guide and scout, whose peerless horsemanship and distinguished personality are household words in two continents—COL. W. F. CODY (BUFFALO BILL), assisted in the picturesque presentation and alignment by that civil war veteran and widely experienced and gifted manager, MR. NATE SALSBURY, Director of the Wild West.

[photo]

COLONEL CODY (BUFFALO BILL) AT LUNCH "IN CAMP".

 

JUST A BEGINNING.

THE WILD WEST is the only organization in the world to which would be at all possible such an opening scene as it presents at each performance. This is not simply because it alone has the material for such a presentation, but for the reason that anything even approximating such [image] COL. W. F. CODY (BUFFALO BILL) REVIEWING HIS ROUGH RIDERS. extraordinary force, originality and spectacular effectiveness would be a crushing anteclimax in any other show, dwarfing by comparison all that might follow it. Here it simply lifts the spectator, through surprise, interest, excitement and enthusiasm, to another plane of perception and appreciation, in which the vivid, rapidly succeeding episodes of the most vehement life this continent has known, fascinate, thrill and convince by their intense realism, carrying the beholder along with a strange sense of personal participation and concern.

Suddenly, through the rift in the plains scenery at the back of the arena, a score of mounted Indian warriors dart out and gallop in single file once around the great inclosure, ending by falling into line and stopping all motion. Their chief follows, riding very swiftly, is greeted by them with the short, sharp yelps that seem to be their salute of honor, and stops in his place with a suddenness that probably jars his back teeth. Twenty or more such bands, each the following [image] THE INDIAN WAR DANCE AS IT IS. of a certain chief and representative of one of the numerous divisions of the great Sioux tribe, in the same fashion come out into the arena and, after a short, swift gallop, put themselves in their appointed places, until a great solid square of Indian warriors is formed.

The looker-on is hardly conscious of the magnetic influence of the scene, until suddenly a realizing sense of the strangeness, bigness and force of it all seems to burst upon him when that formation is complete. Until then his interest has been progressive, from amused and curious interest when the red men began to appear, growing in depth and serious earnest as the bands, one by one, swept into place, until finally it has climaxed in thrilling excitement. The air pulsates with the vigorous life and movement of the savages and their horses, a vibrant impulse that stirs the consciousness more than the senses. But there is more. The nervous stamping of the horses standing in line and the rapid hoof-beats of those coming to join them, make a dull, underlying bass rumble, upon which rise sharply the yelps of salute. And what infinite diversity in costume and amazing riot of color bewilders the sight!

The young "bucks" are anything but red men. They are of all other colors. One, dressed in a breechclout, a feather and a complete suit of green paint, looks like a huge bifurcated pea-pod. Another has made his right half a bright chrome yellow and his left half a brilliant purple. A patient artist has decorated himself tastefully with large white polka dots on a deep blue ground and his fellow has striped and barred himself in exaggeration of the color scheme of a zebra. All use paint, but numbers of the elder warriors and the chiefs confine themselves to modest and conservative facial decoration, such as great patches of bright carmine on the cheeks, dabs of yellow on the forehead or black streaks somewhere. It is known in a general sort of way that some of these markings are tribal and family signs, while others denote membership in the various secret societies to which all warriors belong; but definite information on the subject is difficult of attainment, owing to the reticence of the red men. Beyond these, each individual works his own sweet will in wearing much or little of either paint or clothing.

Following the Indians, come detachments, squads and bands of "Rough Riders": German cuirassiers, English lancers, French light horse, Cossack irregulars, American cavalry, Bedouin Arabs, Mexican vaqueros, South American gauchos and the irrepressible, versatile and vivacious Cowboys from the Western plains. Each band, representative of a nationality or a class, rides in to its own appropriate music, flying its own flag, and is the recipient of the plaudits of the now excited and enthusiastic spectators, in proportion to its individual popularity. Very surely the public makes itself heard, loud and long, in welcome of the American Sixth Cavalrymen, the Cowboys, the Star-Spangled Banner and Colonel Cody, who rides in last of all to formally introduce his "Congress of the Rough Riders of the World".

Then he gives a signal and the hundreds of horsemen put themselves in motion. They ride rapidly, in intricate evolutions, wheeling, circling, dodging, galloping in long lines that coil and uncoil, double upon themselves, meet in pairs and part, one moment seemingly inextricably tangled and the next free, forming new puzzling combinations. The gaudy hues of the Indians, their bright blankets and flaunting feather head-dresses; the showy uniforms and gleaming weapons of the soldiers; the fluttering white burnous of the Arabs; and over all the waving flags and pennants carried by the standard-bearers, together make such a kaleidoscopic, shifting, blending, mingling and contrasting play of colors as dazzles and charms the sight. All the while the feet of the horses make a noise like muttering thunder, accouterments rattle, weapons clash and the air is full of the rush and sway of many heavy bodies moving with energy, swiftly. And from this beginning there is no falling off of interest in this splendid apotheosis of virile manhood.

WHEN General Sherman first saw "Buffalo Bill's Wild West," the grim old warrior, turning to his trusted scout with tears in his eyes, said: "Billy, for my children and grandchildren, who can never see these things as we saw them, I thank you".

 

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"AU REVOIR, BUT NOT GOOD-BYE".
THE GREAT WILD WEST WILL POSITIVELY SAIL FOR EUROPE THIS FALL
THIS YEAR IT WILL TOUR THE AMERICAN CONTINENT
FROM OCEAN TO OCEAN
VISITING THE PRINCIPAL CITIES AND GREATER RAILWAY CENTERS ONLY AS A
PARTING SALUTE TO THE GREAT NATION WHICH GAVE IT BIRTH.
BUFFALO BILL'S
WILD WEST
. . . AND . . .
CONGRESS
. . . OF . . .
ROUGH RIDERS
OF THE WORLD.

AN EXHIBITION THAT TEACHES BUT DOES NOT IMITATE. AND THESE ARE THE MEN WHO DO AND DARE

[drawing]

The Courier Co.

NOW IN THE ZENITH OF ITS OVERWHELMING . . . AND . . .TRIUMPHANT SUCCESS PRESENTING A PROGRAMME OF MARVELOUS MERIT AND INTRODUCING THE
World's Mounted Warriors
SUCH AS
INDIANS, SOLDIERS OF THE AMERICAN, ENGLISH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN AND CUBAN ARMIES,
FULLY EQUIPPED AND READY FOR WAR.

AND THESE ARE THE EVENTS IN THE ACTION:

A Grand Review of All Nations. A Race of Races in which Cowboys, Cossacks, Mexicans, Gauchos and American Indians participate. Artillery Drill by Veterans. A "Round Up" on the Plains with all of its incidental events. Pony Express Riding. Groups of Mexican Horsemen and Lasso Experts. Celebrated Crack Shots and Noted Marksmen. Real Arabian Horsemen and Athletes. Life-Saving Drills by Veteran Members of the U. S. Life-Saving Service, with records for skill and daring. Genuine Cossacks from the Caucasus of Russia. Indian Boys in favorite pastimes. Cowboy Fun with the Bucking Broncos. U.S. Cavalry Drills and Military Exercises. The Famous Deadwood Stage Coach and Indian attack, repulse and victory. Moments with the Bolas Throwers, Rough Riders and Native Gauchos. BUFFALO BILL (Col. W. F. Cody) himself in Feats of Marksmanship. A Buffalo Hunt as it was in the Far West. A Herd of real Buffalo, the last of their race. Grand Military Maneuvers. Episodes of Camp Life with all of its humor and hardships. The Bivouac at night. Assembly of the Allied Armies, incidental drill and action. Realistic scenes "on the firing line". Heroic charges and all the exciting elements of actual warfare and battle, in which
"OLD GLORY" ALWAYS WAVES TRIUMPHANT.

SEE IT WHILE YOU MAY. ENJOY IT WHILE YOU CAN.

  [image]

BUFFALO BILL REVIEWING
THE ROUGH RIDERS OF THE WORLD

COPYRIGHT 1902 BY THE COURIER CO. LITH., BUFFALO, N.Y.

Title: The Rough Rider Annual

Publisher: Cody & Salsbury

Source: McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, MS327.OS1.12

Date: 1902

Topic: European Tours

Printer: The Courier Company

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

Editorial Statement | Conditions of Use

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