Title: The Wild West

Periodical: Salford Chronicle

Date: August 1, 1891

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THE WILD WEST.


Last week attention was called in our columns to the fact that what is known as Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show was again paying us a visit. In our previous notice the history and composition of the remarkable combination presided over by the Hon. W. F. Cody was dealt with, but the details of the romantic encampment at Brooks's Bar proved so varied and interesting that brief space was left to fully describe the particular items forming the programme, and it is to these we now propose to return. Though many of the incidents and pictures portrayed are almost identical with those given in the huge building on the Racecourse in 1887, the difference in the surroundings lends a surprising amount of novelty to the proceedings. When at Salford the show was of a more theatric character, scenic effects being attempted only possible in a covered place, and very beautiful were the illustrations of American frontier history and prairie life that were shown. To our mind, however, excellent as was the exhibition then it is far more effective now held in the open air, and certainly more convincing. It is more natural, and the braves, the cowboys, and even the gallant little horses seem to rejoice in their additional freedom, while the actual buffaloes display an energy that was never attained in the atmosphere provided by the royal borough. We are not much of a success in this part of the world in the cloudless sky business, rain being more in our line than shine, but given even tolerable weather we like our Wild West as a field sport, and this opinion is one that is generally endorsed, judging by the splendid attendances given on the part of the public up to date. On the afternoon of revisiting the ground we hazarded a guess that ten thousand persons were present, and it was afterwards announced that at the two performances that day the numbers totted up to twenty-five thousand. Now to the many merits of the performers and performances. Reference need not be made to the past exploits of General W. F. Cody or Major Burke, for their names are household words to us, and now the added fame of their recent action in the late revolt of the Redskins render them more than ever persons to admire and wonder at. As on the former   visit the entertainment opens with an explanatery speech by a gentleman gifted with a voice of such power that sure the like of which was never before heard in Moss Side. The orator in question is Mr. H. M. Clifford, an actor well known to local playgoers, and one who has gained much popularity in byegone pantomimes, but few of his admirers would recognise him in his present role. He makes himself heard wonderfully well, and as master of the ceremonies introduces the specialities in their due order. The cowboy band, it should be mentioned, provide suitable music throughout the proceedings, the overture being specially good. The band is still under the leadership of Mr. Wm. Sweeney, and it is much improved since four years ago. A general gathering of the tribes, the cowboys, and the whole of the happy family, including their celebrated ruler, Buffalo Bill, is the first announcement from the rostrum, and a very striking assemblage it is. Colonel Cody has got a nice lot of new Indians this time, many of whom participated in the recent disturbances. From reading the very interesting book that can be obtained from the attendants, and from what is remembered of newspaper reports of the ghost dances at the Pine Ridge Reservation, the poor Injuns were rather badly used. Starved and swindled and having no work as hunters, the progress of civilization having placed them, as it were, out of the hunt, is it little wonder that bother should ensue? Fortunately, tact was to an extent applied to take the place of extermination, with happy results. The review over, a race between a cowboy, a Mexican, and an Indian, on Spanish-Mexican horses, takes place, in which the three competitors appear really to compete—indeed, a great charm of all the doings is that those concerned appear so very much in earnest and as a rule, seem to be enjoying themselves. Miss Annie Oakley next claims attention. Her dexterity in the use of firearms is a revelation. She is certainly the champion lady shootist of the world. Mr. Johnny Baker, who formerly was known as the Cowboy Kid, but who now is a well-favoured young man, also proves himself a tip-top marksman; while Colonel Cody's feats with the rifle, firing while mounted, are, as far as we know, unequalled. The revolver shooting by Mr. Claude L. Daly is another perfect exhibition of skill.

Title: The Wild West

Periodical: Salford Chronicle

Source: McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, MS6.3681.115.02 (Oakley scrapbook)

Date: August 1, 1891

Topic: European Tours

Keywords: American bison American frontier American Indians Band directors Bands (Music) Cowboys Firearms Frontier and pioneer life Horses Hunting Indians of North America Mexicans Orators Pistol shooting Rifles Sharpshooters Shooting Western horses

People: Baker, Lewis H., 1869-1931 Burke, John M., -1917 Oakley, Annie, 1860-1926 Sweeney, William, 1856-1916

Places: Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (S.D.) Salford (Greater Manchester, England)

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

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