Title: "Wild West" Indians at a Police Court

Periodical: Birmingham Daily Post

Date: November 30, 1887

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"WILD WEST" INDIANS AT A POLICE COURT.


Two Sioux Indians, named "Black Bird" and "Choice," connected with Buffalo Bill's Wild West, were brought up at the Aston Police Court, yesterday—before Messrs. Hill, Cooper, and Weiss—charged with being drunk in the Lichfield Road on the previous evening. "Black Bird" was further charged with doing damage to the extent of 16s. to the uniform of Police-sergeant Parker at the same time and place. The noble savages, who were enveloped in their blankets during the progress of the proceedings, did not appear to be impressed with the dignity of an English court of justice judging by the frequency with which they smiled and nodded at the magistrates’ clerk (Mr. E. Rowlands). Neither of the defendants were able to speak English, and the services of Broncho Bill were consequently requisitioned as interpreter between the Court and the prisoners. The fact that two of the Indians were in custody caused a large crowd of persons to assemble in the vicinity of the court, while every available seat inside the court was filled.—Mr. E. Rowlands having sworn Broncho Bill, ordered him to ask "Black Bird" whether he was guilty of being drunk in the Lichfield Road? and prisoner replied that he was guilty.—Mr. Rowlands: Will you next tell him that he is charged with doing damage to Police sergeant Parker's clothing? Broncho Bill, after speaking to "Black Bird," said, "He says he don’t know anything at all about it. He knows he was brought here, and that is all he does know."—Mr. Rowlands: Then he admits having had some fire-water? Broncho Bill: He admits he was drunk—had some whisky; but he says he knows nothing about damaging the officer’s uniform.—Mr. Rowlands: Now, what about "Choice?" Broncho Bill: Oh, he says he was drunk.—Police-constable Lowe stated that he was on duty in the Lichfield Road when, from information he received, he took a cab and went to the Reservoir Tavern, and on going inside he found "Black Bird" behaving in an indecent manner, foaming at the mouth, and very drunk. He was nearly naked, having divested himself of his blanket and other clothing. With the assistance of five or six other men witness succeeded in handcuffing prisoner, and putting him into a handcart.—Mr. Rowlands: Was he too drunk to walk, then? —Witness: Yes, sir.—Mr. Rowlands (to Broncho Bill): Do you wish to ask the witness any question?—Broncho Bill: Oh, no; he says he was drunk.—Police-sergeant Parker said that about a quarter to six he met the last witness conveying "Black Bird" to the lock-up in a handcart. Whilst getting him into the police station prisoner was so violent that witness was thrown to the ground, and the knee of his trousers and the sleeve of is coat were torn.—Broncho Bill: We admit the damage.—Police-constable Parker said he subsequently went to the Crown Inn, Church Lane, and there found "Choice" sitting on a bench asleep. Witness aroused him and found that he was helplessly drunk, and they had to carry him to the lock-up.—Mr. Rowlands: Was he very drunk, then?—Parker: He could not walk at all.—Mr. Hill said the Bench would dismiss the charge of drunkenness on the payment of the costs; but "Black Bird," for damaging Parker’s uniform, would be find 1s. and costs, and have to pay the damage, 16s. The total of the fine and costs amounted to £2. 5s. 5d.

Title: "Wild West" Indians at a Police Court

Periodical: Birmingham Daily Post

Date: November 30, 1887

Topic: European Tours

Keywords: American Indians Drinking of alcoholic beverages Police charges Police stations Police Pounds, British Sioux Nation

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