Title: Miss Annie Oakley

Periodical: Evening Express

Date: September 26, 1891

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MISS ANNIE OAKLEY.

"Little Sure Shot," as the famous Sioux chief "Sitting Bull" christened her, is a typical American maiden, as sprightly and charmingly vivacious as she is agile and skilful. Twenty-three years of age, Miss Oakley shoots as naturally as she walks. Her memory fails to carry her back to the period when she could not shoot. "I don't know how I acquired the skill," was her laughing reply to a question put, "but I suppose I was born with it." A mere toddler, this Diana proved destructive to small game, and when in her teens crowned her triumphs over the deer of North Michigan by killing a bear. She took to fancy shooting almost by accident. Miss Oakley was induced to exhibit her skill at a local fair. This led to a friendly match with a recognised gentleman "shot," and step by step led to the adoption of shooting as a profession. But her heart is with the game still, and a week's sport at Shrewsbury later on is anticipated with pleasure. The winner of 41 medals and trophies by shooting feats, Miss Oakley is also an actress, with a play of her own, and her treasures include a collection of magnificent guns, worth between five and six hundred pounds. In connection with the latter the fair owner made a statement—endorsed by a number of experts present—peculiarly gratifying to us who are continually being told that the old country is lagging in the race for commerce. "The stocks are of various makes," she said, "but the barrels are all of British manufacture. No country can produce gun barrels equal to English—no, not even America. Invited to describe the impressions produced upon her mind by contact with various Europeans races Miss Oakley said: "I like Paris very much, and also the better class of Parisians. But the lower class I don't like at all; they seem so rude and forward. Austria I liked, but Germany and Berlin only indifferently. I cannot say why, because we were kindly treated, but there it is, all the same. Italy was agreeable, and Milan and Florence, but Rome—oh, the people were like heathens there." "And England—?" "There is no place like England. It was as if we had come home. There is not much difference between the English and the Americans in matters of dress and manner, but, of course, the language, as spoken, differs considerably. As for Cardiff, we are all delighted with it. The people appear to be very intelligent—much more so than the people of the North of England—and their behaviour is wonderfully good. Another reason, perhaps, for liking Cardiff is the business done—the best of all the towns." With this grateful testimony to the merits of Cardiff and Wales and the sweeping censure of the inhabitants of the Eternal City, my chat with Miss Oakley ended.

Title: Miss Annie Oakley

Periodical: Evening Express

Source: McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West , MS6.3681.121.03 (Oakley scrapbook)

Date: September 26, 1891

Topic: European Tours

Keywords: Bears Deer Hunting Sharpshooters Shooting contests Shooting

People: Oakley, Annie, 1860-1926 Sitting Bull, 1831-1890

Places: Austria Berlin (Germany) Cardiff (Wales) Florence (Italy) Michigan Milan (Italy) Paris (France) Rome (Italy) Shrewsbury (England)? Wales

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

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