Title: The Wild West

Periodical: Morning Advertiser

Date: July 26, 1892

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THE WILD WEST.

Two new features were introduced yesterday afternoon into Buffalo Bill's already highly interesting entertainment at the Horticultural Exhibition, Earl's-court. The first of these additions was an illustration of the prairie emigrant train crossing the plains. The train consists of two waggons, the same as were used thirty-five years ago, drawn by four horses, and accompanied by three or four men and a woman. The camp is pitched, and the evening meal is about to be prepared, when a band of some twenty or thirty Indians, who might previously have been observed creeping towards and surrounding the camp, rushes upon the unsuspecting emigrants. A struggle ensues. Two men and a girl are taken prisoners by the Indians. The fiendish delight with which savages torture their victims is then illustrated. The younger of the two men is compelled to run the gauntlet between two rows of Indian braves, while the old man is tied to a stake surrounded with straw, which is ignited. Here is introduced the scalp dance, the triumphant Indians dancing and yelling hideously around their victim at the stake. Their savage amusement is, however, cut short by the appearance of Buffalo Bill and his band of cowboys, who, after a sharp struggle, put the Indians to rout and rescue both men. The girl, who makes her appearance at the close of the rescue, causes some amusement by mounting stride-saddle behind Buffalo Bill, and accompanying him out of the arena. The second feature is a description of the administration of justice by Judge Lynch. A deserter from the United States army is making his way on foot across the plain when he sees a cowboy sleeping, with his horse tethered beside him. Slowly the deserter approaches the sleeping man, and, having untied the horse, mounts quickly upon his back, and gallops away. The cowboy on awaking missed his horse, and with the idea of making the best of a bad job notes the way the horse has gone, and then proceeds on foot to find his companions. These he meets, and they at once start in pursuit of the thief. An interesting race ensues, but the thief is ultimately brought to the ground by means of the lasso. He is immediately bound hand and foot and hauled to the nearest tree, on which he is hanged. Having administered the law, the cowboys each have a shot at the dead body of the thief and gallop off. Two soldiers and a guide, evidently in search of the deserter, then enter the arena and carry the body away with them. Both additions are exceedingly interesting and well executed, and add much to the attractiveness of the entertainment. The exhibition was very well attended, and judging from the number of our country cousins there yesterday afternoon its fame has been spread far and wide.

Title: The Wild West

Periodical: Morning Advertiser

Source: McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody Collection, MS6, MS6.3778.091.02-T (1892 London)

Date: July 26, 1892

Keywords: American Indians Cowboys Emigrants Exhibitions Frontier and pioneer life Historical reenactments Horse stealing Indians of North America Lynching Scrapbooks Traveling exhibitions Wagon trains

Places: Earl's Court (London, England) London (England)

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

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