Title: Souvenir Album of the visit of Her Majesty Queen Victoria to the American Exhibition

Date: 1887

More metadata
 

SOUVENIR ALBUM
of the visit of
HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA
to the
AMERICAN EXHIBITION.

London, 1887.

COL. HENRY S. RUSSELL.

 

Buffalo Bill Museum
CODY, WYOMING

Donated to Buffalo Bill Museum By Alfred C. Irving 314 Randolph ave Milton Mass

X mas 1931

In memory of my Dear friend W F. Cody (Buffalo Bill)

As fine a specimen of manhood as ever lived. A Gentleman a Scholar and a Fearless Scout of The Plains

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

CONGRATULATIONS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA, ON THE OCCASION
OF HER MAJESTY'S JUBILEE, JUNE 20TH, 1887.


THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION.

The Executive Council, the Executive Officers, and the Exhibitors of the American Exhibition, now being held in London—the first exclusively American Exhibition ever held beyond the limits of the National Territory—desire to respectfully tender their earnest and sincere congratulations to Her Majesty Queen Victoria, whose glorious and beneficent reign of fifty years is unique in the history of the world, and to pray that Her Majesty may long be spared to Her people, and to this great country, which Americans consider, and will ever consider, as the one nearest and dearest to them, after their own native land.

ON BEHALF OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL,
THE EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND THE EXHIBITORS,

JOHN R. WHITLEY,
Director-General.

"Sir Henry Ponsonby is commanded by The Queen to thank the Executive Council, the Executive Officers, and the Exhibitors of the American Exhibition for their kind congratulations."

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[border]figure with 11 images of British royalty

1887

WATERLOW & SONS LIMITED, LONDON WALL, LONDON.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photo]

PRESIDENT CLEVELAND.

[photo]

MRS. CLEVELAND.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

"When was ever such an Exhibition held in a foreign country without government assistance by any other nation in the whole annals of the world?"

THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, June, 1887.  

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION,
-LONDON, 1887.-


EXECUTIVE OFFICERS.

DIRECTOR IN THE UNITED STATES BURNET LANDRETH.
SECRETARY OF THE EXHIBITION JNO. GILMER SPEED.
SECRETARY OF THE ASSOCIATION VINCENT A. APPLIN.
CHIEF OF GENERAL STAFF FREDc. C. PENFIELD.
CHIEF OF INSTALLATION RUFUS M. SMITH.
CHIEF OF FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT JOHN SARTAIN.
ARCHITECT AND SURVEYOR JOHN GIBSON.
CHIEF OF MACHINERY DEPARTMENT ALFRED PICKARD.
CHIEF OF HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT WM. GOLDRING.
ACCOUNTANT ALFRED JOHNSON.
TREASURER CHARLES MILLS.
CHIEF CORRESPONDENT JOHN T. DONNOLLY.
CHIEF OF TICKET DEPARTMENT WM. J. ROWE.
PRESS REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND PERCY.
MEDICAL DIRECTOR J. B. W. BIDLACK.
CHIEF OF JANITORS L. H. SKINNER.
SUPERINTENDENT OF ENTRANCES GEORGE GRAINGER.
CONSULTING ENGINEER FLORENCE O'DRISCOLL.
 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION,
LONDON, 1887.


COMMISSIONERS APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNORS TO REPRESENT THEIR RESPECTIVE STATES.

CALIFORNIA A. ANDREWS, of San Francisco.
COLORADO NOEL MAY, of Denver.
GEORGIA THOMAS P. STOVALL, of Atlanta.
IDAHO P. J. KINNEY, of Boise City.
KANSAS FREDERICK COLLINS.
LOUISIANA SAMUEL P. BLANC, of New Orleans.
   "    JAMES T. GRIFFIN, of London, England.
MAINE J. B. HAM, of Lewiston.
MARYLAND J. THOMAS SCARF, of Baltimore.
MICHIGAN F. W. NOBLE, of Detroit.
MINNESOTA W. D. WASHBURN.
MONTANA JOHN E. KENNEDY, of Blatchford.
NEBRASKA W. F. CODY, of North Platte.
NEVADA W. M. HAVENER, of Reno.
NEW JERSEY WM. S. TAYLOR, of Burlington.
NEW MEXICO W. B. SLOAN, of Santa Fé.
NORTH CAROLINA P. M. WILSON, of Raleigh.
OREGON E. W. ALLEN, of Portland.
PENNSYLVANIA J. G. DITMAN, of Philadelphia.
RHODE ISLAND MARK H. WOOD, of Barrington Centre.
SOUTH CAROLINA A. P. BUTLER, of Columbia.
TENNESSEE L. B. McWHIRTER, of Nashville.
TEXAS S. J. T. JOHNSON, of Corsicana.
VERMONT JOHN B. MEAD, of Randolph.
VIRGINIA E. B. MOON, of Richmond.
 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photo]

F. C. HUGHES-HALLETT

[photo]

RONALD GOWER

[photo]

VINCENT A. APPLIN

[photo]

MISS APPLIN

[photo]

MRS. JOHN R. WHITLEY

[photo]

FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION. LONDON, 1887.
JOHN R. WHITLEY

[photo]

ARTHUR WHITLEY

[photo]

W. D. GUTHRIE

[photo]

MRS. A. PICKARD

[photo]

BLANCHE WHITLEY

[photo]

ALFRED PICKARD

[photo]

J. S. JEANS

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photo]

BURNET LANDRETH

[photo]

MRS. LANDRETH

[photo]

W. L. THORNTON

[photo]

JOHN PRIESTMAN

[photo]

MRS. H. S. RUSSELL

[photo]

PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
HENRY S. RUSSELL

[photo]

HOWLAND S. RUSSELL

[photo]

J. T. GRIFFIN

[photo]

E. A. BUCK

[photo]

JNO. GILMER SPEED

[photo]

MRS. J. G. SPEED

[photo]

MRS. J. PRIESTMAN

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photo]

WM. GOLDRING

[photo]

J. F. TANNER

[photo]

JOHN GIBSON

[photo]

FLORENCE O'DRISCOLL

[photo]

R. M. SMITH

[photo]

F. C. PENFIELD

[photo]

JOHN SARTAIN

[photo]

ALBERT BIERSTADT

[photo]

A. BARTHOLDI

[photo]

ALFRED JOHNSON

[photo]

M. L. LEE

[photo]

J. T. DONNOLLY

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[drawing]

BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF
THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION,
LONDON, 1887.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

EXTRACT FROM THE OFFICIAL CATALOGUE OF THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION, LONDON, 1887.

ABOUT three years ago Mr. John R. Whitley, of London, being on a tour round the world, reached New York on his homeward journey. He read in the New York Herald a paragraph to the effect that it was intended to hold an American Exhibition in London early in the following year. This interested him so much that he resolved to engage his energies in the undertaking, which, whilst it promised congenial employment for his activity, seemed to him to be exceedingly attractive, and likely to become most popular, and also of vast benefit to the commerce of the United States. He had before him the example, in London, of the International Fisheries Exhibition, which had been so eminently successful, financially and otherwise, and he felt sure that an Exhibition, organised upon a first-class administrative and business-like plan, stood a fair chance of success. Fully aware of the progress made by America in manufactures and commerce within the past thirty years, he felt persuaded that an Exhibition, which should illustrate this progress in a practical manner was thoroughly calculated to extend commercial relations with Europe, and also with the British Colonies. He foresaw what an excellent opportunity such an Exhibition afforded Americans for making what might be termed an official débût in the biggest market of the Old World, and it is an unquestioned fact that the United States produce a great number of raw articles, as well as of manufactured goods, which were and are still unknown in England, and it is equally certain that the only means of placing them advantageously before the British public was by means of a public Exhibition, at which people could judge for themselves of their value and utility.

Mr. Whitley placed himself immediately in communication with the American who had originated this idea. It then transpired that it was this gentleman's purpose to hold an International Exhibition in London in 1885, and the Exhibition was to be called American, because the idea of it was conceived in America. Mr. Whitley was of opinion, however, that it would be wiser to defer opening the Exhibition until 1886, and that it should be confined entirely to exhibits from the United States; for he knew, from considerable experience acquired as an exhibitor at great International Exhibitions, how exhibitors have felt the utter impossibility of showing themselves at their best when their space was cut down to an insufficient minimum. In considering this matter, it seemed to Mr. Whitley that it was time to initiate a thoroughly new departure in Exhibitions, and he conceived the notion that no nation could better inaugurate such a departure than the American. His proposition was accepted, and practical work begun by consulting some of the most prominent men in Great Britain as to how such an undertaking would be received by the English public, which, of course, would contribute by far the larger number of visitors to see this practical evidence of the progress made by Americans in arts and industries. The result was that a number of gentlemen, representing almost every class of society in England, declared that they thought such an Exhibition as the one proposed would be not only of the greatest possible interest and value, but extremely popular with the masses. Representative Americans were next consulted, and the answer from the other   side of the Atlantic was identical with the one received from Englishmen, though much more modest, for Americans desired to know first of all, whether even a peaceful invasion, such as was contemplated, would be really welcome in the Old World. In order the better to prove to the people of America that they would be most cordially received with the truest hospitality and friendship, a Council of Welcome was immediately formed in England, which consists of about a thousand gentlemen distinguished in art, literature, science, manufactures, and commerce. It having been demonstrated, in a general way, that there were no insuperable objections on the part of the British public, it became necessary to determine the best manner of organising and developing the whole undertaking. Hitherto all great Exhibitions had been under the fostering care of one Government or another. It was naturally unbecoming that the United States Government should take the initiative and ask permission of the British Government to hold an official Exhibition in the Metropolis of the United Kingdom, and it was equally absurd to expect that the British Government—as a Government—should invite citizens of the United States to come and exhibit in London evidences of their wealth and progress in civilisation, for, however much such an Exhibition might prove to be interesting to the individual Englishman, it unquestionably could not possibly concern the British Government, as a Government. It therefore devolved upon private individuals to take the initiative, either in an individual or in a corporate capacity. It was of course evident that by adopting this course criticism would be invited from all those who had been in the habit of looking to governmental aid in such undertakings; this prospective criticism, however, only acted as an additional incentive to Mr. Whitley, and the American colleagues whom he had invited to associate themselves with him, to demonstrate what individual effort can accomplish. The plan of organisation was presented in detail to the principal United States Consuls resident in Europe, and, without exception, the enterprise was commended by these gentlemen, who well knew what would be the requirements for a thorough representation of the ever-increasing industries and resources of the New World.

Of course, the national Government could not be asked to give any pecuniary assistance; to have asked for this would have been to abandon the fundamental principle of the organisation ; but the originators hoped that so complete an Exhibition of the products and resources of the States and Territories could be made that any capitalist seeking an investment in the United States, or any discriminating man desirous of fixing his home there, would, after several visits to the proposed Exhibition, be in a position to arrive at a reliable conclusion as to what it would be best for him to do, and that in this way the Exhibition would become, as it has, a national undertaking in the broadest and best sense of the term.

In the early part of 1886 the opening of the Exhibition was postponed from May of that   year till May of 1887. Since that time the executive officers have been hard at work; with what result the visitor can now judge for himself.

The main building is constructed of iron and glass, and in the simplest but most substantial manner. The length of the principle gallery is 1,140 ft., and its width throughout 120 ft. Annexed is a refreshment saloon, 90 ft. wide by 240 ft. long; and close to it is the Fine Arts building, consisting of seven rooms, which, owing to the immense value of the works they contain, is built of brick, and is perfectly fireproof. Each room is admirably lighted from the roof.

Six of these rooms are filled with works by American artists. The front central room is known as "the Queen's Room," the two principle works being oil portraits of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, painted by Thomas Sully, the American artist, in 1837. The larger of the two portraits has been loaned as a Jubilee offering to the Executive Council of the American Exhibition by the St. George's Society, of Philadelphia, in whose important and historic building the painting is looked upon as the most valuable in the Society's collection, and occupies the place of honour. The smaller portrait of Her Majesty the Queen has been loaned by the Marquis of Ormonde, and brought for the purpose from Kilkenny Castle, Ireland, where it also occupies the place of honour; and one large room is devoted to a display of American hunting trophies, collected by Mr. E. North Buxton and contributed by a number of English sportsmen, who have hunted in America. An imposing covered bridge, the Washington Bridge, connects the Exhibition proper with the Grand Stand, which has been erected in the Arena of the "Wild West," whence no less than 25,000 spectators can witness the "Sports of the Wild West." Seven other bridges have been constructed, so as to facilitate the passage of the visitors from one part of the Exhibition to another, and over the different railways which intersect the grounds. Round the grand stand is a refreshment bar about 700 ft. in length, and there are four other bars in other parts of the main building and grounds. In addition to these are a band stand in the western gardens, two electric light sheds, one 120 ft. long by 60 ft. in width, whilst the second measures 70 ft. by 35 ft. The Soda-water Pavilion in the main building is 20 ft. by 20 ft. Finally, there are no less than seven entrances, an English Clubhouse, provided by the Council of Welcome, a Diorama of the Harbour of New York, with a replica in miniature (contributed by M. Bartholdi, the sculptor) of the statue of "Liberty enlightening the World," a tobogganing slide, a switch-back railway, a number of Exhibitors' kiosques and pavilions, lager beer saloons, stables for 200 horses, sheds for goods, and several excellent waterproof stores for empty packing-cases, &c. Although economy has been used throughout, still the general appearance of the buildings, which are constructed of wrought iron tie-rods, old railway rails, with a roof of galvanised iron, and glazed skylights, is imposing and elegant.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

THE GARDENS.


THE Gardens, occupying an area of about twelve acres, are approached from the north end of the building, from West Kensington Station, and from the North End Road entrance.

They are divided into two distinct portions, the intervening railway being spanned by two bridges, and from these a view of the whole grounds is obtained. The gardens have been designed and laid out by Mr. William Goldring, the landscape gardener, with the view of embracing as much variety as possible, and also to make the most effective display.

The Central Garden, or that immediately contiguous to the Exhibition building, is laid out in a rigidly formal style, which tends to heighten the effect of the north façade of the building, while the arrangement of broad and straight walks allows ample space for the free circulation of large masses of people.

The West Garden, on the other hand, is designed in a more natural style, the walks traversing the whole garden being graceful. Curving at one point, they wind through a picturesque grove of old trees, while others lead to the principal points of attraction. The old trees near the bandstand happily existed previous to the formation of the present garden, and the visitor may see how charmingly they harmonise with the surroundings.

The Diorama by A. Bartholdi and B. Lavastre presents a view of the Harbour of New York, and of the colossal monument of "Liberty enlightening the World." The view is taken from the deck cabin of a Hudson River steamer. The spectator sees the Statue of Liberty on Bedloe's Island, the Hudson River and the East River, the cities of New York, Brooklyn, and Jersey City, and the celebrated Brooklyn Bridge. The deck of the ship under the eyes of the spectators is filled with personages of which a great number are portraits, such as Mr. Laboulaye, President of the Committee of the Works; Count Sérurier, Vice-President; Mr. Evarts, President of the American Committee; M. Bartholdi, sculptor; M. Gaget, by whom the work was executed in bronze; M. Eiffel, and others. In the annexes of the diorama are shown an Ear of the statue, a model of the real size of the colossal statue, and a collection of photographs, showing the nature of the works and the different phases of the undertaking during the preparation and erection of the "Statue of Liberty."

In the gardens the visitor finds himself surrounded by the native trees, shrubs, and flowers of North America, for no others have been planted. They give an idea, however slight it may be, of the beauty and variety of North American vegetation. Many a tree, shrub, and flower will be recognised as familiar in English gardens, for it is a singular fact that for the last three centuries the   gardens of England have been enriched from the flora of the great Western Continent, which is richer and more varied than that of any country in the world, containing, as it does, no fewer than 10,000 distinct species of plants. One of the chief reasons for planting the gardens exclusively with American plants has been to show how singularly American all English gardens are, as it is an interesting fact that fully two-thirds of the open air trees and flowers in England are natives of North America. The forest of Virginia and of the Eastern States have been drawn upon ever since gardening became a fine art in England, and the oldest, best-known, and most loved trees of English parks and gardens originally came from the United States, chiefly during the early part of the last century. The bulk of what are called modern trees—the prim Conifers, which one may see in every villa garden about London—have come from the boundless forests of the great North-West. The Spruces, the Firs, the Pines of modern gardens, have come from the Pacific coast within the past fifty years. California, the flowery paradise of the far west, has contributed more to make English gardens what they are to-day than any other country of the world. The wealth of annual plants—those that spring up, flower, seed, and die in a year, are alone capable of making a garden glow with brilliant colours, of every shade, from one year's end to the other; in fact, the majority of annuals which are now familiar to every cottager in Britain, are from California, and some idea of the beauty of these may be gleaned from the California annual garden, skirting the walk at the north end of the Exhibition building.

The Californian flora have been largely laid under contribution for the adornment of these gardens, for besides annual plants there are a host of trees and shrubs representing the juvenile stage of the gigantic trees of the forests, the Mammoth tree, the Redwood, the Pines, the Cypresses, all of which and many others may be found in the plantations throughout the grounds. Nor must the lilies be forgotten, for half the lilies in British gardens have their origin in America. A few come from the Eastern States, but most of them are natives of the mountains, cañons, and forests of the region west of the Rocky Mountains. A full collection of these are planted in the West Garden, one group being kindly presented by Mr. G. F. Wilson, of Weybridge, who is well known all over the world as the king of lily growers. He has devoted nearly his whole life to the study and culture of lilies. He has been the pioneer of lily-culture in England for twenty years, and his gardens on the Surrey hills contain the most complete collection of lilies in existence. There is every promise that during July and August the tall wand-like stems of the Panther lily, Washington lily, Californian lily, and many others, will wave their stately heads of bloom in these gardens.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

The bulk of the plants in the garden are what are called hardy perennial plants that are at home in the English climate, and of these the collection is very rich. They have been contributed by Mr. Ware, of Tottenham, near London, who possesses the most extensive nursery of hardy plants in the world. The aim has been not to make a full collection of hardy American plants, as the temporary nature of the Exhibition Gardens forbade it, but a representative garden of native plants from the mountains, plains, prairies, swamps, and woods of North American, and Mr. Goldring has endeavored to create a perennial glow of colour throughout the whole period of the Exhibition, and he has also grouped the plants so as to produce either a pleasing harmony of colour or a decided contrast.

For instance, in one part is a large mass of yellow-flowered plants of the sunflower tribe, intermingled with the glowing scarlets of the Bee Balm (Monarda didyma), and the Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), of , the south-western States. In another part is a mass of the gorgeous Tiger flower of Mexico (Tigridia pavonia), whose large, showy flowers, though they last but a day, are succeeded by others which maintain a display of bloom for weeks during the height of summer. The little rockery near the band stand is planted with swamp-loving plants, such as the Mocasson flower of the swamps of the Eastern States, the Trilliums from the shady pine woods, the cowslip of Virginia (Mertensia Virginica), and the American cowslip (Dodecatheon), which by the way is one of the earliest flowering of American plants. The opposite rockery teems with a variety of mountain plants, phloxes, poppies, gentians, and others. Near these is a mass of the Camassa esculenta, the Quamash of the North American Indians, by whom its bulbous roots are used as an article of food. The edible qualities of the quamash are not appreciated in this country, though the plant happens to be among the showiest border flowers. Many other prairie flowers may be found about the grounds, but those who have seen them in their native habitats will hardly recognise them in the improved state to which they have been brought by cultivation.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Fine Arts Galleries.

(The Queen's Room.)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

(Southern Façade.)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Northern Façade of Main Building.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Hall of the American Hunting Trophies.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Hall of the American Hunting Trophies.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

(Looking South.)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

(Machinery Department.)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

(Machinery Department.)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Main Exhibition Building.

(The Wheelock Engine)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

The Main Exhibition Building.

(Alimentary Products)

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

Band Stand in Western Garden.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

[photograph]

The "Welcome" Club.

 

[border]border, four sides, with figures

QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
E PLURIBUS UNUM
THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

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Diorama of New York Harbour.

(and Bartholdi's Statue of "Liberty enlightening the World.")

 

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QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
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THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

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Northern Garden and Toboggan Slide.

 

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QUEEN VICTORIA 1837.
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THE "WELCOME" CLUB AMERICAN EXHIBITION.
"WHEELOCK" ENGINE
NEW YORK HARBOUR
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAIN BUILDING

THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION,
SOUTH KENSINGTON.


BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST

From the Plains of America.

DESIGNED TO ILLUSTRATE THE LIFE OF THE FRONTIERSMAN AND
THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN.


THE WILD WEST EXHIBIT IS LOCATED ON THE EASTERN SECTION
OF THE GROUNDS, COVERING ABOUT SEVEN ACRES OF LAND.

 

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COURT CIRCULAR.


The Queen, accompanied by their Royal Highnesses Prince and Princess Henry of Battenberg, attended by the Dowager Duchess of Athole, General the Right Hon. Sir Henry Ponsonby, K.C.B., General Lynedoch Gardiner, and Colonel Sir Henry Ewart, K.C.B., drove to the American Exhibition in South Kensington, yesterday afternoon, and witnessed the performances of the "Wild West" Exhibition.

The Queen witnessed the various performances on horseback of the Hunters and Indians of the Prairies, as well as feats of shooting by the men and by Miss Annie Oakley and Miss Lilian Smith. A war dance was also executed by the Indians, and the squaws brought their papooses to salute her Majesty.

Her Majesty was received by Colonel Russell, President of the Exhibition; Mr. John R. Whitley, Director-General of the Exhibition; Lord Ronald Gower, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes-Hallett, M.P.

After the performance, Colonel the Hon. W. F. Cody had the honour of being presented to the Queen by the Marquis of Lorne. Two of the Indian chiefs were also presented to the Queen.

Her Majesty, with their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess Henry of Battenberg, and attended by the Ladies and Gentlemen of the Household, was escorted to Paddington by a travelling escort of the 2nd Life Guards, and arrived at Windsor Castle at 7:30.

PROGRAMME OF EXHIBITION BEFORE THE QUEEN.


Names of those persons connected with the "WILD WEST" who were presented to the QUEEN—COL. W. F. CODY, Mr. NATE SALSBURY (Director), Mr. FRANK RICHMOND, "RED SHIRT" (Sioux Chief), Miss ANNIE OAKLEY, Miss LILIAN SMITH, BRONCHO BILL (Interpreter), ELLA IRVING (Half-breed Woman) and Child, LIZZIE, UNPA-TO-HA (Indian Woman) and Child, HA-PE-AH (Indian Woman) and Child.

 

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HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA AT THE "WILD WEST" EXHIBITION.

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BENNIE IRVING

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RED SHIRT

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"BUFFALO BILL"

COLONEL W. F. CODY

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MRS. NATE SALSBURY

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ALBERT E. SCHEIBLE

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JOHN M. BURKE

 

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BUFFALO BILL'S "WILD WEST"

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LILIAN SMITH.

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BUCK TAYLOR.

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SERGT BATES.

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ANNIE OAKLEY.

 

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BUFFALO BILL'S "WILD WEST"

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MOUNTING A BUCKING HORSE.

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THE DEADWOOD STAGE COACH.

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RIDING A BUCKING HORSE.

 

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HUNTING WILD BUFFALOES.

 

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THE DEADWOOD STAGE COACH.

 

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BUFFALO BILL'S "WILD WEST,"

FROM THE PLAINS OF AMERICA.

NO Exhibition of "America in miniature" would be complete without a faithful representation of the conditions of life in the Far West.

The Wild West Exhibit is located on the eastern section of the grounds, covering about seven acres of land, and is accessible by Washington Bridge, which connects it with the main building, by a covered way from Earl's Court Station, and two gateways, one in the Warwick Road and the other in the Lillie Road directly opposite the West Brompton Station.

The Wild West is designed to illustrate the life of the frontiers-man and the North American Indian, and to graphically pourtray the methods by which the United States have been civilised, from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast. It must be distinctly borne in mind that this representation is given by the real people, who have been brought five thousand miles from their prairie homes, and by Indians taken from their reservations by permission of the United States Government.

The grounds are triangular in shape. The Grand Stand faces the east, and is the largest structure of the kind ever erected in England. It is entirely covered and crescent-shaped. It will hold about 20,000 people. Under the Grand Stand are refreshment bars.

The arena in front of this stand is about one-third of a mile in circumference. The scenery which surrounds this is painted on canvas and extends to a great height, shutting out the neighbouring houses. It is merged at the bottom into rocks, trees, and shrubbery, giving a realistic representation of a rocky pass in the mountains through which the scouts and Indians defile upon the plains represented by the arena.

Concealed by this rocky gorge, and adjoining the entrance from the Warwick Road, will be found the "Corral," an enclosure for the safe keeping of animals. In this are contained a herd of buffaloes, a herd of elk, and a few specimens of the "Washoe Canary," or mountain burro, a species of donkey used in transporting ores from the mountain mines to the plains below. Some specimens of the small black-tailed deer also find a temporary home in this corral.

The stables are ranged on each side of the roadway leading from Warwick Road to the camp. They contain 166 bronco horses and Indian ponies. These are fine specimens of the wild horses of the plains, which are the progeny of the Berber horses which escaped from the Spanish invaders, and whose descendants overspread the prairies of the West.

The word "bronco" is of Spanish origin, and is used on the plains irrespectively to mean rough or unbroken as regards either horses or ground. They are small animals, averaging about thirteen hands in height, and weighing 500lbs. or 600lbs., but are remarkable for their endurance and fleetness. Many of them are parti-coloured, and these are called by the Indians "Cyuse" and by the Cowboys "Pintos." They are also generically known as "mustangs."

 

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Among then are some incorrigible "buckers," or wild horses, so called from their peculiar manner of "buck-jumping" with the object of unseating their riders. Among the horses in the stables is a dark bay gelding named Charlie, now nineteen years old, and which has been ridden by Buffalo Bill (Col. W. F. Cody) for over fourteen years. "Charlie" has been with Col. Cody in many campaigns in the Indian country, notably in that of 1876, when "Buffalo Bill" killed chief "Yellow Hand," and on one occasion he performed the feat of carrying Col. Cody one hundred miles over a prairie country in nine hours and forty-five minutes, rider and trappings weighing 243lbs.

The stable-yard contains the historic Deadwood stage coach, which was repeatedly attacked by Indians and road-agents (highwaymen), in the same condition that it was in when last attacked.

In the rear of the Grand Stand and extending towards Lillie Road will be found the encampment of Indians, Cowboys, Mexicans, etc.

This encampment gives an exact idea of the life in camp of Indian fighters on the one hand, and of that of their enemies on the other. Entering the enclosure from Washington Bridge, leading from the main building, the Indian camp will be found on the right. Here a band of Indians of the Sioux, Cheyennes, Ogallallas, Arapahoes, Shoshones, and other tribes. They are living in their high conical tents (decorated with rude drawings, symbols of the sign language), which are called "tepees," They are accompanied by their "squaws" and "pappooses," or wives and children.

The entire band is under the command of "Red Shirt," a distinguished Indian chief and warrior, who has intelligently accepted the situation, since being conquered. There are here also specimens of half-breed interpreters and "squaw men," or white men who have married squaws and joined the Indians.

On the left are the quarters of the daughters of pioneers and frontiersmen, who, from the circumstances and stern necessities of their early life, have become accomplished rifle shots, and bold and daring horsewomen.

Farther down on the right of this pathway, will be found a rude cabin used to cook the rations, and to the right and left the mess tents.

Turning up the Avenue are found the tents of the Cowboys, the Mexicans, and the Cowboy Band.

The word "Cowboy" is used to describe the most expert and accomplished herder of cattle. A cowboy passes through the various grades of range-worker, cow-puncher, brander, herder, road worker, and trail-guide, until he is competent to command a large body of assistants, and safely care for and pilot thousands of head of cattle any distance or to any place. More than this, he is an accomplished Indian fighter and rifle shot, and necessarily a superb horseman.

The cowboy is not unfrequently a college-bred man, who has adopted this strange calling from pure love of adventure, and many of the cattle kings of America have risen from cowboys, among them the Marquis de Mores, son of the Duke of Vallambrosa.

 

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The Cowboy band has been organised from those Cowboys who have cultivated a natural talent for music to while away the idle hours of camp life. On the left are the staff tents and the quarters of Sergeant Bates, who carried the American Flag throughout the Civil War, and afterwards throughout the Southern States and Great Britain.

On the brow of a small hill facing the entire encampment is pitched the Official Headquarter tent of the Wild West Company. It is occupied by Mr. N. Salsbury, who is business manager and vice-president of the Company. To Mr. Salsbury's skill as a manager is due, in a great measure, the financial success of the enterprise.

In the centre of the camp, at the foot of the bluff, is the headquarter tent of Col. William F. Cody, known all over the world as "Buffalo Bill," a sobriquet applied to him after his unparalleled feat of killing 4,862 buffaloes in one year, besides deer and antelope, to supply meat to the labourers engaged in building the Kansas Pacific Railway.

Born in Iowa, his parents removed to Kansas while he was a mere child, and his father was killed in the "Border War" whilst Col. Cody was yet a boy. Thrown on his own resources at an early age, his life from that time to this has been a record of the most marvellous adventures. Colonel Cody has been despatch bearer, pony express or mail carrier, wagon-train guide, wagon-train master, train master, hunter, trapper, trailer, guide, scout, stage driver, Indian fighter, and in short has passed through every phase of border life until he reached the position of "Chief of Scouts of the United States Army," and in that capacity he has been the trusted comrade and friend of the most famous generals and Indian fighters of the United States.

In 1876 he accompanied Gen. E. A. Carr, U.S.A., on the Black Hills Expedition, to avenge the massacre of Gen. Custer, and, on coming up with the Indians, he rode out in front of the two opposing forces, drawn up in line of battle, and killed Chief "Yellow Hand" in single combat before the general engagement began.

Col. Cody is a perfect horseman, an unerring shot, and of magnificent presence and physique. Gen. Carr, in his report, says of him: "His personal strength and activity are very great. His eyesight is better than a good field-glass; he is the best trailer I ever heard of, and he is a most extraordinary hunter."

He owns a large ranche on the North Platte River, in Nebraska, has been a member of the State Legislature, and is now colonel and aide-de-camp on the staff of the Governor of that State.

The exhibition is given in the arena twice daily, at 3 and 8.30 p.m., and the camp and grounds are open to inspection at all times from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.

 

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BUFFALO BILL'S "WILD WEST" CAMP.


STAFF.

W. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill). Wm. C. Gayler. Frank Whelan. Tom Duffy.
Nate Salsbury. W. O. Snyder. Tom Webb. Maror Beardsly.
Jno. M. Burke. Lew Parker. Broncho Bill. Kit Buell.
Albert E. Sheible. J. S. Cannon. Billy Pugh. Tony Esquivel.
Jules Keen. Robt. Morris. Jno. Hancock. W. Langon.
Carter Couturier. Buck Taylor. Billy Bullock. Chas. Smith.
Thos. J. Cash. Cherokee Bill. Jim Kid. Thos. Mahoney.
Harry A. Lee. Jim Mitchell. Broncho Bill. H. Hunstine.
Frank Richmond. Dick Johnson. Johnny Baker. Dave Lawrence.
 

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STAFF—continued.

Robt. Taylor. D. F. Esquivel. Jno. Boyer. Fred. Lavigne.
Joe Artman. José Romay. J. Ferguson. J. K. Whaley.
Cal. Mullen. Serapio Rivera. Jno. Nelson. James Brown.
Chas Bumback. Ben Galindo. Frank White. Jno. Dunn.
Dave Wilson. Andreas. A. Jalbert. Wm. Hunt.
Henry Lounge. Pedro Esquivel. E. Lehfelt. Jno. Hayday.
Louis Hatch. Emilio Guiterrez. J. Small. Arn. Robinson.
Wm. Lansfield. Carlo Martinez. E. Y. Snyder. Knocker Ring.
Wm. M'Cune. Sancho Hernandez. G. W. Turner. Tom Cupping.
Court Mason. Don Henriques. C. J. Johnson. John Jones.
Frank Wilson. Antonio Pubero. D. J. Merrill. James Bass.
C. A. Bailey. Dovaro Finellio. Frank Smart. J. W. Herbert.
Chas. Davis. Ed. King. C. P. Illman. Geo. White.
John Oakes. Arthur King. Miss Emma Hickock. Jas. Quinn.
A. Marchand. Mustang Jack. " Della Ferrell. Jas. Cutter.
Wm Sweeny. Capt. Fred. Matthews. " Poncha Aguero. Jno. Gaines.
Chas. Sturm. Henry Melmer. " Annie Oakley. Swift Jackson.
W. H. Cox. Tom Williams. " Lilian Smith. Henry Martin.
D. W. Shoemaker. Sergt. Bates. " Georgie Duffy. Andrew Wood.
Chris Schetting. Fred. Bowman. " Bessie Ferrel. Samuel Arthur.
H. Kniep. Barney Comrie. " Fannie Woodward. Wm H. Harrison.
Jno. Link. Eddie Goodman. " Lizzie Stanton. Frank P. Nicoll.
Andrew Link. Bob Williams. Mrs. Margaret Whitaker. James Kitchen.
Thos. Murphy. S. Canfield. " Annie Ferrell. Edward M'Pherson.
S. K. Thomes. C. D. Maxwell. " A. Esquivel. Oliver Stevens.
Leon Joret. Burt Fuller. Antonio Provost. Morris Kerns.
Juan Bille. Jesse Hinds. John Higby. Jas. Mulroy.
Timeteo Caber. Eugene Overton.
 

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The following North American Indians are included in the "Outfit" of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Exhibition.

Indian Names English Equivalent.

Chief of the Sioux Nation.

Ogila-sa Red Shirt.

Cut off Band of Sioux.

Wan-Kan-Ki-yan Flies Above, chief.
Pahawanka Medicine Hill.
Tata-Ka-wi-sa Bull Man.
Wable-gle-gra Spotted Eagle.
Wahorpileta Red Nest.
Wi-Keu-Ke-to Blue Rainbow.
Ki-ci-e-cun Wounds one another.
Too-ti Wounded.
Haraka-Wable Eagle Elk.
Wable-canto Eagle Heart.
Wahan-pa-mani Arrow Wound.
Cet-an-ogoiko Swift Hawk.
Tanka-sha-hinka Slow White Bull.
Sunka-ska White Horse.
Sunka-wanaga Dog's Ghost
Iyan-mato Rocky Bear.
Mato-yanni Three Bears.
Zenkaelo-ska White Bird.
Chiyrolo-wapato Cheyenne Butcher.
Teweya-gli Returns from Scout.

Arapahoes.

Tata-ka-ahaga Little Bull, chief.
Wica-rapi-sha White Star.
Okislia-waste Good Boy.
Indian Names. English Equivalent.

Arapahoes (continued).

Sasunka-wakanlo Medicine Horse.
Wable-glasha Spotted Eagle.
Hihan-luta Red Owl.
Wabli-watapho Charging Eagle.
Taeayla-wicoklo Kills close to Lodge.
Wasien-mato American Bear.
Calan-luto Red Hawk.
Wusta-Rago Makes Good.
Mato-iyanko Running Bear.
Icna-Kinze Fights all Alone.
Tusnhu-warahm Broken Thigh.
Wicasa-takla Little Big Man.
Sunka-luta Red Dog.

Cheyennes.

Tolo-kokco Cut Meat, chief.
Okisilo Boy.
Pa-ranreyl Stands on Hill.
Tawska-kinzi Yellow Horse.
Harka-placolo Short Elk.
Harka-sapa Black Elk.
Maya-hanka Piece of Iron.
Jeaga Raised.
Tosunka-cicila Little Horse.
Jangla-hayenha Runs Close.
Se-oka Cut Foot.
Haraka-wakan Medicine Elk.
Cara-sapa Black Kettle.
Indian Names. English Equivalent.

Cheyennes (continued).

Wapaha-sapa Black Bonnet.
Oguha-luta Red Sack.
Paguta-hanska Tall Medicine.
Tohuska-tanka Big Leggings.

Brule Sioux.

Hanpisk-ka Mocassin Top, chief.
Pamin-gila Yellow Hair.
A-caupe Hollows Behind.
Roka Badger.
Mato-wan-kantya High Bear.
Wable-wan-Kanbye High Eagle.
Hape-yape Throws away.
Mato-orouko Rushing Bear.
Maka Ground.
Woelna-gi Stands up.
Wamble-nupa Two Eagles.
Tieu-gla-kati Kills close to Hill.
Okisila Bissonett.
Natinsane-mage Standing Rabbit.
Harake-bloka Doe Elk.
Wiciyala Yankton.
Si-tunka Big Foot.
Nape Hand.

Shoshones.

Sunka-tamaca Poor Dog, chief.
Tataka-mona Walking Bull.
 

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Indian Names. English Equivalent.

Shoshones (continued).

Ticagla-inyanka Runs close to Lodge.
Maga-howaste Iron Good Voice.
Wable-nupa-oksila Two Eagle Boy.
Sunka-Owiesiha Gives away Horses.
Wanni-Yonin-sicola Little Whirlwind.
Ota-Kate Kills Plenty.
Cipe Black.
Sinna-rilisa Torn Blanket.
Wakiya-ska White Lightning.
Harake-magi Standing Elk.
Mawakan Sword.
Indian Names. English Equivalent.

Shoshones (continued).

Mats-wasagse Old Black Bear.
Sila-Ktae Kills Pawnees.

Ogalallas.

Macaci-Kaola Little Chief, chief.
Hupe-ka Picket Pin.
Tasinka-hinsa Sorrel Horse.
Moto-nagi Standing Bear.
To-kikya-kte Kills First.
Cante-sapa Black Heart.
Indian Names. English Equivalent.

Ogalallas (continued).

Itunhala Mouse.
Sha White.
Watan-ya Good Light.
Asampi Milk.
Tanuka-wable Eagle Horse.
Shitoni Spider.
Sunkinto Blue Horse.
Wohn-wiza Two Lance.
Tospi-cici-ja Little Wound.
Sina-san Grey Blanket.
Catuhe tanka Big Ribs.
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NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS AND SQUAWS.

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SERGEANT BATES AND INDIAN CHIEFS.

WATERLOW & SONS LIMITED, LONDON WALL, LONDON

Note: May have been printed by the company Waterlow & Sons Limited, London Wall, London, England. Front cover verso inscription is by Alfred C. Irving: From https://www.lib.rochester.edu/index.cfm?PAGE=3092 "A keen admirer of Buffalo Bill, A. C. Irving of Milton, Massachusetts, sought permission to remove the three Cody children buried in Mount Hope and re-inter them with their parents. New York State law, however, required permission of two surviving grandsons, which was not obtained. Mount Hope, therefore, retains the idealized dreams of a father and is one of the few places of permanence in the life of a legendary, peripatetic showman."

Title: Souvenir Album of the visit of Her Majesty Queen Victoria to the American Exhibition

Source: James Wojtowicz Collection, McCracken Research Library, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, MS327

Date: 1887

Topic: European Tours

Sponsor: This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Geraldine W. & Robert J. Dellenback Foundation.

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